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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

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Old 05-17-06, 11:54 PM   #426
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Any of you guys do triathlons?
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Old 05-18-06, 12:03 AM   #427
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BTW guys I fearlessly got the Dura Ace pedals. wouldn't have been sure without some heavyweight experience, so thanks. Of course the 130 lb guy at the bike shop thinks I should get em. so far so good. out of the saddle climbing I noticed it was very stable compared to the Mt spd's I was using. overall more solid bike/rider interface.
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Old 05-18-06, 07:26 AM   #428
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Well, training for my first century (this Sunday) finally got me under the 300# mark. 60# down and another 80 to go.

I'm 6'1" and of German farmer stock so 210-220 is about as light as I'll ever be.

I ride an alumnium GT Edge Aero I built when I moved to NYC. 36 spoke triple cross non butted mavic wheels with Ultegra hubs -- that is how I ride through NY's cobblestones and potholes without rebuilding the wheels every week.

I average about 150-200 miles per week.
Make that 74# to go. Down 6 more at last night's weigh in.
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Old 05-18-06, 10:57 PM   #429
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clydesdale and then some

I think I have most of you beat 303lb 6'. I exersize daily but am interested in road biking. I have done some mtn biking in the past. What is a good bike(s) for someone my size? Thanks for replying
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Old 05-19-06, 12:18 AM   #430
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well here is my suggestiong for a big guy road bike can't go wrong with chromo steel they are not as hard on you as aluminum

aluminum is stiffer but it transmits road vibration and can be a real pain
a good steel bike can be just as stiff as aluminum but more comfortable because steel doesn't conduct the vibration as easily

heck my old kobe is an old lugged steel japanese frame and I weigh about 225 an when i climb the whole rear end looks like a fish but it won't break or wear out anytime soon guess my weight plus being able to leg press the heavy end of a vw bug is a bit mush but it works for me

I am interested in trying and aluminum out for races but if your just riding at this weight class you won't notice and extra few pounds from a steel frameset

hope this helps
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Old 05-19-06, 11:26 AM   #431
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cohophysh
I think I have most of you beat 303lb 6'. I exersize daily but am interested in road biking. I have done some mtn biking in the past. What is a good bike(s) for someone my size? Thanks for replying
I'm no expert -- I'll get that out there first -- here are my thoughts:
  1. is money an issue?
  2. what is your goal?

If you are just looking to get exercise, then your mountain bike will do it, too. Swap out your knobby tires for slicks, maybe go with a bigger set of chainrings/smaller cassette and enjoy the ride.

If you are looking to spin... to really get some good cardio and cover some miles, then I would suggest (within the constraints of #1) spend extra money on some good wheels. When I built up my bike, the number one thing I did was splurge on the wheels. (Splurge being pretty relative in the bike world.) I was 375#, 6'1" when I started and NYC is not known for good road repair. I needed rock solid wheels.

Keep in mind: when you buy a new bike, you can usually upgrade parts for the difference in price between the part spec'ed to your bike and the price of your upgrades. So, that is the best time to do it.

Also, ride a little on a road bike before you buy. See if you can rent from your local bike shop(s) for a day. And if you can, get different makes/models/sizes. The geometry is different for all of them. You'll get used to the different (mountain -> road) position before you lay out cash. When I went to road from having been on the dirt for years, it took some getting used to. If I had just bought a road bike then, I would probably have gotten the wrong thing.

And buy the bike which is a little more aggressive than you like at the bike shop. After a few weeks you won't notice the difference and you'll ride better for it.

One more thing, get a good seat and shorts. Three hundred and three pounds of pressure is a lot wear and tear on the taint.
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Old 05-21-06, 11:50 PM   #432
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I got back into Bicycling both for the exercise and to save on the gas. I'm 221lbs It's also a good
ALT form of Transportaion as I'm singal and only drive one vehicle.
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Old 05-21-06, 11:55 PM   #433
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Just a quick question for the group. Are there any other Bicycling chat rooms any where on the
net at all? Thanks in Advance.
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Old 05-22-06, 11:07 AM   #434
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I agree with RETEM,my favorite ride is all 4130 and gives a great ride-put some nice cork tape on and you have real comfort and a hard to explain sense of liveliness that I dont get from my aluminum/carbon mix bikes.It has 36 hole sun rims and at deuce&1/4 I feel confident that I wont break anything.
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Old 05-23-06, 07:22 AM   #435
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Heya folks! I'm a long time lurker, and a new poster. Yes, I am a clydesdale. 6'1", 302# (as of yesterday . . . I'm actually down 15# from a month ago, go me). I've started biking to work
(5.5 miles each way, no sweat), and plan on going full car free within the month.

Having not done much road biking in my life (read: never), I'm quite (and possibly a bit foolishly) excited about it all, but I do have some questions. Namely the handlebars. I've never done the whole dropped bars thing (I hope that's what it's called), and I'm not quite confortable yet. I've found that after a few minutes, the area inbetween my thumbs and my hand get massively sore. I am wearing gloves when I ride, and my handlebars are slightly padded (I'm on the '06 Trek 1000, all stock parts). Can anyone direct me to either a post/site/pics of how I should be properly holding the bars? Right now I've got my hands more or less resting above the brakes for easy access to the shifters and the brakes, with the main brake assembly between my thumbs and hands (which seems to be the culprit for the hand pain).

This thread is the best (although at this point, it could be it's own seperate forum . . .)
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Old 05-23-06, 07:45 AM   #436
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JPSmee
Heya folks! I'm a long time lurker, and a new poster. Yes, I am a clydesdale. 6'1", 302# (as of yesterday . . . I'm actually down 15# from a month ago, go me). I've started biking to work
(5.5 miles each way, no sweat), and plan on going full car free within the month.

Having not done much road biking in my life (read: never), I'm quite (and possibly a bit foolishly) excited about it all, but I do have some questions. Namely the handlebars. I've never done the whole dropped bars thing (I hope that's what it's called), and I'm not quite confortable yet. I've found that after a few minutes, the area inbetween my thumbs and my hand get massively sore. I am wearing gloves when I ride, and my handlebars are slightly padded (I'm on the '06 Trek 1000, all stock parts). Can anyone direct me to either a post/site/pics of how I should be properly holding the bars? Right now I've got my hands more or less resting above the brakes for easy access to the shifters and the brakes, with the main brake assembly between my thumbs and hands (which seems to be the culprit for the hand pain).

This thread is the best (although at this point, it could be it's own seperate forum . . .)
Sounds like you are putting a bit too much pressure on your hands. This is one of the issues I had when I first restarted riding. What is your handlebar height vs saddle height? Are they about level, or is the HB lower than the saddle? If lower, you might consider a raise of the handlebars to level with your saddle. This may require a change of stem, but it'll be worth it. You may also try some core exercises (Crunches, crosscrunches, etc) to strangthen the back and abdominals. This will allow you to use the lower body to support some of your body weight, thereby easing the stress on the hands. This will also have the additional benefit of making you stronger and healthier and flatten out the stomach as well. Good for you for resuming a healthier lifestyle and I applaud your efforts. By the way, I am speaking as someone who has lost more weight than you currently weigh (and I'm not kidding).
As your condition gets better, you will find some distinct advantages in drop bars. You can get more aerodynamic against a headwind. You get better power transfer and utilize the abdominal muscles to assist the pedaling more, thereby getting more power in the stroke.
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Old 05-23-06, 10:06 AM   #437
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To the good advice above I would add dont keep your hands in a single position but have 2-3 positions that you alternate.
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Old 05-23-06, 10:22 AM   #438
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Thanks for the tips. I'll check on the height during my lunchbreak. I don't have a multitool with me, but I can get it set up if needbe when I get home this afternoon.

And to Mikeyp.1, thanks for the tip. I'll try to remember to alternate positions.
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Old 05-23-06, 11:08 AM   #439
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To the other observations I would add that there is a bunch of stuff a really good fitting (of you and your bike) can help fix. (Stem length, bar height, seat height, seat fore and aft, even length of cranks, etc.) There is plenty out there to read on this stuff. If you bought at a good local bike shop they may/should be able to help. (I would try and go when it is slow.)

Also, not all gloves are created equal. I just got a pair of Bell gel gloves and they are luxurious. Much less tingle in my hands after a long ride. Also, if you can't get any relief they also make padded inserts you can put under your bar tape. (Some riders double wrap for extra cushion, too.) But give it some more time before you go making any real changes.

Oh and make small changes in your set up and make them one at a time. Trust me.
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Old 05-23-06, 01:22 PM   #440
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Anyone tried one of these?

Searched this thread and was surprised to see no mention of the Co-Motion Mazama - a bike specifically designed for Clydesdales!
http://www.co-motion.com/mazama.html
(disclaimer - I have no connection with them)
Not cheap, almost $3000 for a full build, $1400 for the frame, but it looks like it should last a lifetime.


-Paul
5'10, 220 lbs, usually on my Gunnar Street dog fixie or a Rivendell Rambouillet.
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Old 05-23-06, 02:05 PM   #441
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I agree about the hand positions but I also disagree with lowering you seat if anything raise the stem if possible you always want to be able to fully extend your leg otherwise your knees will pay the price big time


usually I ride on the top flat of the bar when climbing or cruising
I ride the lower flat and verticle of the bar when I am trying to turn tight or draft and I would try getting some goot cork tape like bontrager or cinelli

and welcome to road biking the most efficient man machine interface known

Let me just ad really quick that If you have a hard time getting used to drop bars you can always go for some flat bars or bullhorns
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Old 05-23-06, 04:07 PM   #442
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Retem
I agree about the hand positions but I also disagree with lowering you seat if anything raise the stem if possible you always want to be able to fully extend your leg otherwise your knees will pay the price big time


usually I ride on the top flat of the bar when climbing or cruising
I ride the lower flat and verticle of the bar when I am trying to turn tight or draft and I would try getting some goot cork tape like bontrager or cinelli

and welcome to road biking the most efficient man machine interface known

Let me just ad really quick that If you have a hard time getting used to drop bars you can always go for some flat bars or bullhorns
Who said anything about lowering the saddle? What was suggested was adjustmentrs to the stem height to adjust HB and saddle to a level position.
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Old 05-23-06, 09:15 PM   #443
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sorry to be miss understood .. it has been my experience that people lower their saddle to fix the problem of getting the bars and saddle level or comfortable

sorry to sound like I am repeating myself but althought the trek is a really nice bike it is an al and caron combo / aluminum frame carbon forks

these bikes tend to be really stiff it is a good thing but a little harsh on the rider at first until you get used to riding a road bike

btw nice bike man and welcome to road cycling it is alot faster than a sluggish mtb

most of the guys I know that are recent converts I tell to go with steel first then carbon or al
and alot of cycle trainers will tell you to ride steel if you are older than say 45 because it is easier on your body but it is also all about preference at my size and weight a couple of ounces or pounds aren't really going to kill me

Last edited by Retem; 05-23-06 at 09:22 PM.
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Old 05-23-06, 10:01 PM   #444
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Hosses', any preference between a cyclocross or a road bike...are cyclocrosses a little beefier for us clydes. I am looking at several brands...felt/trek/kona...both cyclo and road. Also should I be concerned about the strength of carbon?????

down from 318 to 303!
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Old 05-23-06, 10:07 PM   #445
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I like road and steel 4130 cromo double or triple butted or if your into old school get a lugged steel frame they are really comfy and don't beat you up like a carbon or al will just depends on if you are concerned about weight and some steel bikes are lighter than al because they can use thinner walled tubing because steel is stronger than al and deals with stress better

I currently ride a
late 70's kobe cobra with sun tour equipment
a early 60 freespirit ted williams by puch townie / ss convert
and a mercier fixie
am actually looking at getting a newer steel road bike with campy
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Old 05-24-06, 04:53 AM   #446
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Retem
sorry to be miss understood .. it has been my experience that people lower their saddle to fix the problem of getting the bars and saddle level or comfortable

sorry to sound like I am repeating myself but althought the trek is a really nice bike it is an al and caron combo / aluminum frame carbon forks

these bikes tend to be really stiff it is a good thing but a little harsh on the rider at first until you get used to riding a road bike

btw nice bike man and welcome to road cycling it is alot faster than a sluggish mtb

most of the guys I know that are recent converts I tell to go with steel first then carbon or al
and alot of cycle trainers will tell you to ride steel if you are older than say 45 because it is easier on your body but it is also all about preference at my size and weight a couple of ounces or pounds aren't really going to kill me
Not a prblm! Personally, I love my 531 alloy frame! I'm very much old school with a late 80's Raleigh w/ Friction shifters. My riding position is HB lower than the saddle, but that's personal choice. I can tuck down into the drops and get fast as hell on a DH and have plenty of pulling power going up. Granted, after 85 or so miles, I need to stretch out some, but what can I say?
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Old 05-24-06, 07:34 AM   #447
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Thanks again for the input folks. As it turns out, the seat and bars are in an ideal spot for me. I did however try shifting my hands a bit, and lemme tell ya, no problems at all! I'm also consciously stopped placing all of my wieght on my hands (I didn't even realize I was 'till looking at the responses), and it's like a whole new ride. I'm thinking that now once I can get my endurance up, I'll be able to survive my LBS's weekly 40 mile ride (my current goal).

Speaking of goals, what would you think are some realistic ones for someone new to road biking? I've mentioned the 40 mile ride bit, and to be honest, I'm all gaga about biking right now, and I can't seem to figure out what's within reach, or just a pipe-dream. Any recommendations on where I should set my sights?
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Old 05-24-06, 10:13 AM   #448
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JPSmee
Thanks again for the input folks. As it turns out, the seat and bars are in an ideal spot for me. I did however try shifting my hands a bit, and lemme tell ya, no problems at all! I'm also consciously stopped placing all of my wieght on my hands (I didn't even realize I was 'till looking at the responses), and it's like a whole new ride. I'm thinking that now once I can get my endurance up, I'll be able to survive my LBS's weekly 40 mile ride (my current goal).

Speaking of goals, what would you think are some realistic ones for someone new to road biking? I've mentioned the 40 mile ride bit, and to be honest, I'm all gaga about biking right now, and I can't seem to figure out what's within reach, or just a pipe-dream. Any recommendations on where I should set my sights?
I was well over three hundred pounds when I signed up for the Montauk Century in February and had not riden a bike in a few years. (I used to mountain bike weekly when I was in college but that was 10 years ago.)

Fortunately for me I can ride to work every day so my training was not a huge inconvenience. (It is actually faster to ride the 13 miles each way than to use NYC's mass transit.) I did a couple of longer rides two and four weeks before the ride to make sure I could do what I was signed up for. (There was a "metric century" option which is 66 miles (100 kilomenters.) in case I got cold feet at ride time.)

I rode the full century this past Sunday. Under 6 hours to complete with an average speed of 17.14 mph. Not a blistering pace for most people but I was psyched and I'm jazzed for doing this again.

(Also, I'm down below 300 for the first time in over a decade now. And have dropped from a snug 48" waist to a comfy 42". The most amazing part is I enjoy it. I've never enjoyed exercising before.)
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Old 05-24-06, 01:18 PM   #449
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JPSmee
Thanks again for the input folks. As it turns out, the seat and bars are in an ideal spot for me. I did however try shifting my hands a bit, and lemme tell ya, no problems at all! I'm also consciously stopped placing all of my wieght on my hands (I didn't even realize I was 'till looking at the responses), and it's like a whole new ride. I'm thinking that now once I can get my endurance up, I'll be able to survive my LBS's weekly 40 mile ride (my current goal).

Speaking of goals, what would you think are some realistic ones for someone new to road biking? I've mentioned the 40 mile ride bit, and to be honest, I'm all gaga about biking right now, and I can't seem to figure out what's within reach, or just a pipe-dream. Any recommendations on where I should set my sights?
JP, Realistically, I can see you doing a century ride by fall, fairly easily. All it will require is saddle time. The sky is the limit! Welcome to the wonderfull world of cycling! If you want motivation, look at my back story. Go to my blogspot blopg and look at the video I have embedded there, called a year in the life: Runaway Train. It's at http://theamazingshrinkingman.blogspot.com
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Old 05-24-06, 01:22 PM   #450
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I don't know what you physical condition is but you should be able to clock an average pace of about 15mph with a good multispeed bike right now on my singlespeed which is a 73.1 gear ratio I can get up to about 20 or so mph

on my multi-speed I am averaging around 35mph
I am also a 23yr old martial artist that can leg press the heavy end of a vw beetle so it all depends on physical condition

and if you really want speed stand up and climb like hell just put all your weight on the bottom bracket true force and muscle is the way all races should be won
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