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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

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Old 10-03-06, 09:44 AM   #1
shog
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Humor: So is my bike going to burst into flames and kill me ?

This is humor/observation I've been reading the posts in this forum and I have to ask how much of what I am reading is pure internet mythology and how much is true ? For example I'm close to 300lb, ride 60-100 miles a week on 23 mm tires on 20 spoke straight laced wheels on a bike with a carbon fork. I have over 1500 miles on the road bike this year on less than ideal roads, my typical cruising speed is around 19mph on crappy chip and seal roads. So far other than an initial truing my wheels have held up fine, the carbon fork has stayed intact, and the tires have not shreaded and disintegrated. Now I will admit I am probably shortening the life of some of my components, but by reading the posts in this forum I probably need to strip a harley frame buildup a crankset with industrial power transmission components and semi tractor trailer tires and rims.

Shog

PS: I guess what I am saying is ride more worry less, parts are going to break, there are no guarantees, all warranttees void, don't pass go, and the odds of dying a 1 to 1 so go ride and do the things you enjoy.
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Old 10-03-06, 10:07 AM   #2
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All I can say to this is... HELL YEAH!!!

Seriously, no doubt. I've known some locals to ride bikes "too small/fragile" for them down from large weights without a problem. A guy I saw on a trail who I initially was making fun of being able to pass, rode his Madone down from 325 to well under 200. I was blown away. He even admits he's not fast, suffering from older legs and joints, but he looks great.

I remember when I first posted. The cookie-cutter answer to what I needed in a bike was "Hoss". You know what? The Hoss is cool and all.. but my Hardrock works just great.

I've put 500 miles (just passed the 500 mile mark last night) on my '07 Hardrock since 8/2. Knock on wood, nothing at all has gone wrong with it. And I beat the snot out of it, riding hard, fast, and over anything in my path (thank you thorn-resistant tubes).

Before that I probably put 500-1000 (no idea, this is a ballpark as I didn't keep track) miles on a old Raleigh M40. I broke a old chain, and a couple spokes, but it withstood my abuse. I'm finishing up a tune-up on it, and hope my brother can ride it.

Anyway, enjoy whatever bike you have. Don't worry about it. You'll break it sometime, even the weight weenies break spokes. If you like it, buy it, and ride the hell out of it.
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Old 10-03-06, 11:49 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shog
Now I will admit I am probably shortening the life of some of my components, but by reading the posts in this forum I probably need to strip a harley frame buildup a crankset with industrial power transmission components and semi tractor trailer tires and rims.
I'm gonna retrofit a Boss Hoss with components welded from Peterbilt and John Deere leftovers, and find a way to put Weld wheels and BFG tires on it to make sure I never break anything!
Seriously though, if your setup is working fine then ride the hell out of it and enjoy. I'm a big fan of building bombproof stuff, but that's my choice. I could get away with some lighter components, but I'm not worried about the weight. I'm paranoid about breaking things, so I build my ride like a tank.
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Old 10-03-06, 07:48 PM   #4
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You canbuild a house out of carboard boxes, but sooner or later you're goingto wish you had opted for wood framing and brick.
I'd rather spend money on components I KNOW are going to last and take the abuse rather than buy something that I'll have to replace often.
But then again, maybe you just have really really good luck.
I had a Trek 1000 for 3 months. Rear rim turned into an egg. Instead of getting a high quality one to replace it I went the cheap route, thrice, and ended up dumping alot of money into a bike that I had started to hate riding.
I sold it and gave up on biking until almost 2 years ago when I got an ATB with strong wheels and good components. Now I bike 700+ miles a month.
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Old 10-05-06, 08:18 AM   #5
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What I am trying to say is that while there is a lot of well intentioned advice on the internet a new rider doesn't need to follow all of fit and some of it isn't necessary. It's just not the advice for clydes either you don't need to adopt the position and bike fit of elite racers either.

You don't have to have a bike built like a peterbuilt truck if you are heavy. Sure going with the best components (especially wheels and avoid the true weight weenie stuff) always a good decision but honestly I would rather see someone out riding than agonizing over the fact they don't p225/70/r16 tires <G> on their bike.


My .02 and change
If you want a road bike buy a road bike, don't be fooled by some of the advice out there and end up with a mountain bike for road riding. Yea some people do this but I tried it and it sucked for me as I don't like the slack head angles and upright position (although on the trails they are great).

Budget for a good set of wheels in the future as I do think the advice on heavy duty wheel sets is a good one. Rant -- I think most of the bike mfg are doing the biking community a disservice in this area, the default wheel on most bikes should be 32 or 36 spoke wheels.

Buy the best components you can afford. There's a big difference in shifting/braking between the low end and high end stuff.

Braking - If you are heavy and doing a lot of hills I would consider something with disk brakes as they work great for hauling you down. However if you are mostly doing flats with small/occaisionaly hills I think rim brakes will work fine they have for me.

Buy a triple unless you just have to have a double. There's nothing wrong with dropping down onto the small ring and spinning up a hill.

Tire wise I've been cruising around on 25mm tires all year without any issues and for road riding I'm not sure I would go above 28mm and I don't think I would drop down to 23mm tires. Watch your tire pressure the skinnier the tire the more important this is.

Stay up on the maintenance of your bike. Check you tire pressures before every ride, keep the chain and driveline clean, keep the bike clean. Do these things and your bike will take care of you.


Most of all worry less and ride more.


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Old 10-05-06, 08:30 AM   #6
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What I am trying to say is that while there is a lot of well intentioned advice on the internet a new rider doesn't need to follow all of fit and some of it isn't necessary. It's just not the advice for clydes either you don't need to adopt the position and bike fit of elite racers either.

You don't have to have a bike built like a peterbuilt truck if you are heavy. Sure going with the best components (especially wheels and avoid the true weight weenie stuff) always a good decision but honestly I would rather see someone out riding than agonizing over the fact they don't p225/70/r16 tires <G> on their bike.


My .02 and change - from a 300lb (+/- 5%) rider

If you want a road bike buy a road bike a clyde doesn't need a mountain bike for road riding. Yea some people do this, I tried it myself and it sucked for me as I don't like the slack head angles and upright position for road riding.

Frame wise I think most mid range frames will hold up fine but consult with the mfg or reputable LBS.

Budget for a good set of wheels in the future as I do think the advice on heavy duty wheel sets is a good one. Rant -- I think most of the bike mfg are doing the biking community a disservice in this area, the default wheel on most bikes should be 32 or 36 spoke wheels. I will comment that my straight laced wheels have held up well but I do take care not to abuse them.

Buy the best components you can afford. There's a big difference in shifting/braking between the low end and high end stuff.

Braking - If you are heavy and doing a lot of hills I would consider something with disk brakes as they work great for hauling you down. However if you are mostly doing flats with small/occaisional hills I think rim brakes will work fine they have for me.

Buy a triple unless you just have to have a double. There's nothing wrong with dropping down onto the small ring and spinning up a hill.

Tire wise I've been cruising around on 25mm tires all year without any issues and for road riding I'm not sure I would go above 28mm and I don't think I would drop down to 23mm tires. Watch your tire pressure the skinnier the tire the more important this is.

Stay up on the maintenance of your bike.
-Check you tire pressures before every ride !!!!! This is the number one killer of rims.
-If a wheel goes out of true get if trued immediately
-Keep the chain and driveline clean
-Keep the bike clean.
-Do these things and your bike will take care of you.


Most of all worry less and ride more.


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Old 10-05-06, 10:38 AM   #7
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I agree 100%. I have been getting upset reading some of the threads in here and I know not to take them personally. I just bought a road bike and I feel a lot of the posts are condesending towards bigger riders with more "You cant's" then "Go for it!".

All of the post seem to steer bigger guys away from road bikes and towards hybrids and mountain bikes. They make it seem its impossible to ride a road bike. Oh you have to have atleast X amount of spokes, Y width tire, and Z frame material because A,B, and C wont cut it.

If you want a roadbike get one and be realistic about what to expect. I just purchased a road bike. I understand I need to keep the tires inflated, I need to true the wheels more often then other people and I plan on upgrading the wheels when I break these, but I can still ride a road bike. Its not an impossible thing to do.

Sometimes I read to much and ride to little. The more I see on this forum the more I feel like I can't do what I am doing because I may not have the best stuff out there. I can't afford DuraAce, Ultegra, or even 105. I dont have a carbon frame, a titanium frame, or a carbon/whatever frame.

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Old 10-05-06, 10:44 AM   #8
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Wow Shog I just put that size tire on mu Honda Element never thought to get an extra set for my bike. Just kidding, good points all, I think the biggest thing for me is gettinga bike that fits you and your happy with the way it handels. I'm 270 6'2" and have been ridding my Gitane Interclub road bike since I bought it new in 73, with no component failure just normal wear and tear. I like your slogan WORRY LESS RIDE MORE! my new motto. drew
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Old 10-05-06, 10:59 AM   #9
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There seem to be a number of people experiencing component failure, and a number who don't. I'm all in favor of a scientific explanation. (after-all if I can figure out how to mitigate component failure, I'd much rather have the nicer lighter components)

so here's a guess. A lot of the supposedly weight-related component failures come not from the actual weight of an individual, but from how that individual rides. I think its possible something as simple as positioning oneself for bumps and getting out of the seat a little more often might be the difference between an intact or a cracked CF seatpost.

like I said, just a guess, an in no way meant as an insult to someone who's experienced such a component failure. It could just be that you got one of murphy's lemons.
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Old 10-05-06, 11:25 AM   #10
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bdinger: A hardrock is a tank of a bike. Heavy as hell too. Thats what i started out riding and it held up real well except for the wheels.

The Hoss and similar bikes are just as tough, but lighter and more agile.
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Old 10-07-06, 02:31 PM   #11
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Shog, you nailed it. I'm three bills and I ride a carbon-fiber frame with Deep-V wheels and I haven't had any problems. Wait, there was one problem...I spent two years riding a hybrid on metric centuries and century rides because all of the "experienced cyclists" told me I was too heavy for a road bike. They were well-intentioned and had a lot of miles under their wheels, but they weren't Clydes. I finally decided if it breaks, it breaks, and bought a road bike. I wish I had done it two years ago. I also agree that a lot has to do with how you ride. I avoid potholes and I don't bunny hop curbs.
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Old 10-07-06, 02:47 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Turboem1
I agree 100%. I have been getting upset reading some of the threads in here and I know not to take them personally. I just bought a road bike and I feel a lot of the posts are condesending towards bigger riders with more "You cant's" then "Go for it!".

All of the post seem to steer bigger guys away from road bikes and towards hybrids and mountain bikes. They make it seem its impossible to ride a road bike. Oh you have to have atleast X amount of spokes, Y width tire, and Z frame material because A,B, and C wont cut it.

If you want a roadbike get one and be realistic about what to expect. I just purchased a road bike. I understand I need to keep the tires inflated, I need to true the wheels more often then other people and I plan on upgrading the wheels when I break these, but I can still ride a road bike. Its not an impossible thing to do.

Sometimes I read to much and ride to little. The more I see on this forum the more I feel like I can't do what I am doing because I may not have the best stuff out there. I can't afford DuraAce, Ultegra, or even 105. I dont have a carbon frame, a titanium frame, or a carbon/whatever frame.
Turboem, I ride a nearly 20 year old road bike. I started with a Mountain bike when I got to the point I could restart riding a bike, before that I rode a semirecumbent trike! As much as possible, I try to steer a new Clyde rider to a '90's geometry rigid mountain bike because those are essentially a heavy duty road bike with 26" wheels. I try as much as possible to keep them in 26" wheels because those are the strongest wheels out there. I generally recommend a road bike for anybody 330 and under weight wise, and for the "Uberclyde" (of which I was one at my peak body weight of 581 pounds!), I recommend the strongest, safest components possible due to the stresses that they put on the wheelsssss, etc. My feeling is that someone should get the best bike they can afford....forget what they say over in the road forum! If a dept store bike is all the $$ they have, then they are at least riding! If I can hook them up with a quality ride for their money, I will! I am most assuredly not elitist!

The reason I try to steer them to the strongest components because a wheel failure when you weigh in the Uberclyde category can kill you! I know what cycling has done for me, and I do what I can to encourage others to ride as well.
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Old 10-07-06, 04:59 PM   #13
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How long your bike frame, wheel and tires last is almost totally up to you.

It depends on if you can miss potholes and big bumps etc. Or if you slow down to go over something when you need to.
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Old 10-09-06, 10:37 AM   #14
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I have to back shog up on that. I started riding at 250+ (now 230) on a Shimano R540 16-spoke wheelset with 23mm tires and carbon fork. I had heard about potential wheel problems but my LBS said not to worry (they didn't sell me the bike). After 1000mi over some pretty crappy roads, the wheels are still true and I'm never even had a flat.

One good side effect was that the "Danger! Danger!" crowd put me onto a steel frame. Best choice I ever made, but not because of its durability.
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Old 10-09-06, 12:05 PM   #15
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It all depends really.

I'm barely a Clydesdale sneaking in at just 200lbs/5'7. But I ride heavy, and probably end up putting components under more pressure than a lot of 300lbs guys.

I tend to break spokes a lot, and I smashed a rim pretty bad hitting a kerb at speed. I probably would have broke my good Mavic rims too, but there's no way I'd have snapped 6 DT Swiss double butted SS spokes with that kinda riding.

If you're a careful rider, the light weight stuff could work just fine. Otherwise it's nice to know you can hop that kerb, carry that extra 50lbs on your rear rack and power through on those cranks in difficult conditions all without hearing a nasty snapping sound. YMMV.
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Old 10-11-06, 09:33 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shog
This is humor/observation I've been reading the posts in this forum...
Bike Forums? Or the Clydes section?

Definately for Clydes there are some considerations but for the most part if you like it ride it!

As a Clyde years ago I tacoed both wheels at once on a cheapie roadbike so yeah, there are some considerations to take into accound when you're 200+. As Tom said - the extra weight takes a toll!
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Old 10-11-06, 12:09 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by krazygluon
There seem to be a number of people experiencing component failure, and a number who don't. I'm all in favor of a scientific explanation. (after-all if I can figure out how to mitigate component failure, I'd much rather have the nicer lighter components)

so here's a guess. A lot of the supposedly weight-related component failures come not from the actual weight of an individual, but from how that individual rides. I think its possible something as simple as positioning oneself for bumps and getting out of the seat a little more often might be the difference between an intact or a cracked CF seatpost.

like I said, just a guess, an in no way meant as an insult to someone who's experienced such a component failure. It could just be that you got one of murphy's lemons.
It is not just how someone rides but also has to do with how the bike/components were assmebled. If the mech that built the bike did not pay attention, rushed it or was just a hack then he/she might have put to much torque on a bolt, damaged a weight bearing section (fork, bars, etc.) or perhaps the bike/component was damaged during delivery to the shop and the damage may have been internal.

I rode a hard tail carbon frame for ten years. I used it for XC, DH and some light freeriding and it never failed and this was a frame I purchased when cf was first starting catch on. Man, you think some folks are fearfull of the stuff these days, imagine how they were back in the early '90s.

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Old 10-16-06, 01:02 PM   #18
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I seem to be pretty hard on bearings - or so my last bill shows. Then again, perhaps not. Our roads are rock with a little sand / mud between. Lots of impacts. I tend to ride on the pegs so I don't feel it as much, especially coming down hill - but the bike does. I suspect if I was lighter the bearings would fair better.

And then again, perhaps not.
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Old 10-16-06, 01:30 PM   #19
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I think a lot depends on your riding style. I'm 6 ', 230#, barely move my upper body when riding. I've been road riding 25 years and can 'read' the road to avoid bumps, potholes, etc. Someone maybe not as big, but a 'jerkier' and/or less observant rider may cause more wear and tear on a bicycle.
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