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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

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Old 10-03-06, 04:05 PM   #1
kf5nd
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Clydesdales, I need help in a hurry

I have the honor of having been invited to address a bariatric support group at the local hospital on the role that cycling can play as form of physical exercise.

But, problem is, I have only one week to build up a PowerPoint presentation on the subject from scratch... unless someone has one in their back pocket that they'd be willing to email to me ?

I need specific equipment recommendations for conventional bikes, recumbents, trikes, and quad cycles. Makes, models, specifications.

And pointers on how these folks should get started, and ideas about training programs, assuming they haven't been on a bike in years. What are reasonable weight loss expectations? Bariatric specific safety advice would be greatly appreciated.

Whatever you think of. A Clydesdale FAQ would be great.

I am going to search this forum and do my own work, but if any of you could give me a head start, that would be great.
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Old 10-03-06, 04:17 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kf5nd
I have the honor of having been invited to address a bariatric support group at the local hospital on the role that cycling can play as form of physical exercise.

But, problem is, I have only one week to build up a PowerPoint presentation on the subject from scratch... unless someone has one in their back pocket that they'd be willing to email to me ?

I need specific equipment recommendations for conventional bikes, recumbents, trikes, and quad cycles. Makes, models, specifications.

And pointers on how these folks should get started, and ideas about training programs, assuming they haven't been on a bike in years. What are reasonable weight loss expectations? Bariatric specific safety advice would be greatly appreciated.

Whatever you think of. A Clydesdale FAQ would be great.

I am going to search this forum and do my own work, but if any of you could give me a head start, that would be great.
Peter, my husbands original blog may be of help. The original URL is http://theamazingshrinkingman.blogspot.com. He is Tom Stormcrowe here on the forums and PM him if you want, he'd likely be happy to help!
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Old 10-03-06, 07:42 PM   #3
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You know, I considered that. But I rejected it in part because extended exercise
burns up so many calories. I don't think you need to know all the makes and models, tell them to go to a bike shop and not Wally World, and then tell them why. Tell them to start easy, and build slowly. Tell them the basics of what we talk about here, helmets, tune ups, hydration, stretching. You don't need to cover everything. Talk for 1/2 to 2/3 of your time, but leave some for questions.
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Old 10-03-06, 09:18 PM   #4
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Low impact, low joint stress, high fun factor, "finding an excercise you like-and will stick with," saves time (if you can commute on a bike), and you get to wear those cool looking bike shorts
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Old 10-03-06, 09:39 PM   #5
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I'm with late and some of the other posters--they don't need a lot of specifics, especially stuff that will bog them down in details or scare them off with prices. Just get them MOVING. I think they're even immune to the usual warnings here about staying away from cheap bikes, because what they really need to do is get off their asses and go.
A used bike from the Salvation Army ($20 to $50 around here) is plenty for that purpose. I've bought two that way, for my wife (a very casual cyclist) and for my daughter to use in college. Often they just need some lube and maybe new tires, and my wife's done several 50-60 mile rides on hers.
I speak from some experience here...I'm a longtime (30 years plus) cyclist, and I was pretty proud of having gained "only" a couple of pounds a year until I realized two years ago that I'd been doing it since the Carter administration. At 6'4", I'd gained 60 pounds from my college weight, to 272. With very modest diet changes (I used BalanceLog, but it was only a help, not a necessity) and six months of burning 4000-10,000 calories a week on the bike, I took off 50 pounds. Soon as I slacked off, in November, it started coming back, and when I focused on it again, it went away. I've had to accept that I don't have the will power to maintain a low-calorie diet, but if I can burn 5000-8000 calories a week through movement, I can eat pretty much anything I want.
One thing I'd stress won't come as a surprise to you, but it's important: You have to find an exercise you enjoy. I used to run, even did several marathons in my 40s, but I got to the point that I just couldn't face one more 10-miler around the same course I'd run for 20 years. Swimming bores me silly, and I started skiing too late to really get good, plus it's a hassle and expense. I've been cycling since I was 45, and after 16 years I'm still getting better and still enjoying it.
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Old 10-03-06, 10:55 PM   #6
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check the clydesdale forum at mtbr as well

http://forums.mtbr.com/forumdisplay.php?f=95
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Old 10-04-06, 09:56 AM   #7
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You can stand in front of a bunch of folks and spew boat loads of technical information about bikes, routes, caloric consumption, etc. but really, are they going to be interested in it? Put yourself in their shoes. Keep it simple and stress that it's a fun activity that is great for their overall fitness and health. Share some of the stories on here if the members don't mind. There's some great ones.
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Old 10-04-06, 10:35 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dewey Oxberger
Low impact, low joint stress, high fun factor, "finding an excercise you like-and will stick with," saves time (if you can commute on a bike), and you get to wear those cool looking bike shorts
Other good selling points = using the bike for errands , shopping and commuting, rolling excercise into daily activities so you are more commited.

You could mock those diet adds: Lose weight, Get Rich, Save Time. Ask Me How!!!
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Old 10-04-06, 12:06 PM   #9
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When I got started (at 324lbs.) I had a lot of problems with the bike falling appart. A bike shop guy clued me into tandem parts (wheels and brakes) and that is probally why I stayed with it. The other thing that really made a difference was staying off the street and using bike paths. Its hard enough to haul your fat ass up a hill without worring about getting run over by a garbage truck.

I lost 70 lbs in 6 months, the down side that cycling is addictive as crack cocaine, it's real tought to live through a Chicago winter without a bike ride. IT's not the cold, its the snow.

Good luck
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Old 10-04-06, 11:00 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by onelung
Cycling is addictive as crack cocaine.
Ain't that the truth!
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Old 06-26-07, 10:43 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by onelung
When I got started (at 324lbs.) I had a lot of problems with the bike falling appart. A bike shop guy clued me into tandem parts (wheels and brakes) and that is probally why I stayed with it.
Good luck

I'm sorry to resurrect this old thread, but this really interested me.

We have a local organization called Sibley Bike Depot which takes old donated bikes and distributes them to people who need them.

I'm thinking of volunteering, so I can learn bike mechanics while doing some good. I picked up an old Schwinn World Sport to rip apart and learn on.

Wouldn't it be a cool thing to build Uber-bikes? Special bikes for Clydes with some of the considerations mentioned here on the board?

I* think it's a great idea. The old steel frames are good for Clydes, right?

Is onelung still here? (I'd love to hear the story behind your handle...) Can someone tell me more about these tandem parts, in beginner language?
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Old 06-27-07, 05:43 AM   #12
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Tandem hubs: wider axle spacing, 48 or more spokes, designed for 500 pounds or better load.
Steel Frame: Far superior for a Clyde.
By the way, there are bikes from Workman that will hold 500+ pounds.

One source is www.supersizedcycles.com which is owned by an Athena! Joan got into it because she's a big gal herself!

I haven't seen Onelung in a while though.
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