Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 10-12-06, 04:09 PM   #1
howsteepisit
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
howsteepisit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Eugene, OR
Bikes: Mecian
Posts: 3,979
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 241 Post(s)
I don't want to be a clydesdale any more

I am tired of being a clyde. I currently weigh in at 220 or thereabouts. I should be 170-175. Exercise alone and I don't lose any wieght. So I have swallowed my pride and am starting weight watchers. Any sucessor failure to report on their program, especially how does it affect you cycling?
howsteepisit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-06, 04:17 PM   #2
kensuf
My idea of fun
 
kensuf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Gainesville, FL
Bikes: '06 Litespeed Tuscany, '02 Kona Lavadome, '07 Giant TCR Advanced, '07 Karate Monkey
Posts: 9,804
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I'm right there with you dude.. I'm at 207 right now and want to drop that last 30, but my experience has always been that dieting tends to wreck my performance and I'm doing two back to back centuries the weekend after this one.

Buttttt, on October 23rd I'll be back on the wagon.

Good luck to you! I'd be curious to find out how WW works out for you.
kensuf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-06, 04:25 PM   #3
Mike_Morrow
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Bikes:
Posts: 76
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I was an UberClyde (400 lbs) when I started my diet (lifestyle change) I was tired and sluggish for a few weeks. Once I got used to the restricted intake, if I was careful about the quality of the food I ate (balanced diet) I was able to be quite active (Usually an 60 to 90 minutes of fairly intense cardio daily)without issue. I would bet you will notice an initial hit but then you should be good to go, Weight Watchers is a solid plan. Good luck!
Mike_Morrow is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-06, 08:10 PM   #4
bikingshearer 
Crawlin' up, flyin' down
 
bikingshearer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Democratic Peoples' Republic of Berkeley
Bikes: 1967 Paramount, 1982-ish Ron Cooper,1986 De Rosa Professional, 1978 Eisentraut "A," 1961 BianchiCompetizione, 1994 Trek 520, 199? Burley Bossa Nova, early-1970s Cinelli Speciale Corsa
Posts: 3,350
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15 Post(s)
I agree that the WeightWatchers plan is a good one. The calculation of how much you should be eating accounts for exercise after the first couple of weeks. You don't get a huge boost in "points" for exercising, but you get some. Indeed, they will encourage you to exercise in addition to restricting weight loss for all the usual reasons.

No need to feel embarassed about joining (this from a two-time drop-out). I, for one, commend you for reaching out for the help. You know what? It just might work.
__________________
"I'm in shape -- round is a shape." Andy Rooney
bikingshearer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-06, 08:15 PM   #5
Landgolier
THIS SPACE FOR RENT
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Bikes:
Posts: 2,849
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Depends how much you ride. 45 min 4 times a week or something, it should be great for you. However, if you're doing 150 miles a week (or more), WW is going to be rough. You just won't be eating enough to fuel your riding. It's a good program, but it's not designed for people burning 8000 calories a week through exercise.
Landgolier is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-06, 06:00 AM   #6
Air
Destroyer of Wheels
 
Air's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Creating some FA-Qs
Bikes: Nishiki Sport, Downtube IXNS, 1950's MMB3 Russian Folding Bike, MTB
Posts: 3,598
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Paging Hambone! He's been on it and is quite active. He could probably pipe in here about his experiences.
__________________
The Almighty Clyde FAQ || Northeast Index
eTrex Vista References || Road Reference


It's the year of the enema!
Air is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-06, 08:27 AM   #7
markm109
Senior Member
 
markm109's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: SE Michigan
Bikes: '03 Litespeed Blue Ridge; '04 Litespeed Solarno; '12 VooDoo Nakasi
Posts: 290
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Landgolier
Depends how much you ride. 45 min 4 times a week or something, it should be great for you. However, if you're doing 150 miles a week (or more), WW is going to be rough. You just won't be eating enough to fuel your riding. It's a good program, but it's not designed for people burning 8000 calories a week through exercise.
+1

The first six months of this year I was on a restricted diet. I lost 30lbs during those 6 months. Nice and slow weight loss and I have not gained anything back since I stopped watching what I eat.

I ran into a problem in May and June where I was expending too many calories doing 120+ miles a week and couldn't stay on the diet because I was hungry all the time. My plan was set up so I would eat 2,800 calories a day which would make me lose 1/2 lb a week and exercise would get me the other 1/2 pound. I had a hard time with the food but stuck with it. Only after the warm weather came and I really got exercising did I stop the program because of hunger.

I've tried WW in the past - and if I remember, you are on about 1,600 calories. You are going to starve at that level. They don't take into account you can burn 1,000 calories an hour biking.

Get a HRM so you can monitor your exercise and adjust your food accordingly. Don't try to loose it too fast and remember your body can only consume 300 calories an hour so don't overeat - spread it out thru the day.

Mark
6'1" - 240 now
markm109 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-06, 09:34 AM   #8
Nightshade
Humvee of bikes =Worksman
 
Nightshade's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Bikes:
Posts: 5,363
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Any good program you take up must include a trip to the doctor
to establish your overall general health to allow you to modify
your program to suit any unknown (or known) health issues.

It's very foolish to simply take off on any plan to lose weight
and stress your heart or other organs just because you think
"I'm OK".

KNOW THAT YOU ARE ,IN FACT, REALLY OK. Then go for it.

Best wishes, mate.
__________________
My preferred bicycle brand is.......WORKSMAN CYCLES
I dislike clipless pedals on any city bike since I feel they are unsafe.

Originally Posted by krazygluon
Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
Aluminum: barely a hundred, which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?
Nightshade is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-06, 10:10 AM   #9
damian_
Arrgghh me hearties!
 
damian_'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Western Australia
Bikes: Thorn Brevet, Felt, Europa, plus a million pieces of bikes
Posts: 98
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I'd caution on a couple of things regarding Weight Watchers while putting in a fair amount of physical activity.

1. Make sure that you consume enough calories per day - there is nothing worse than overtraining and undereating, as it can cause you to become tired, lethargic, sick and lose muscle mass.

2. Weight Watchers doesn't (to my knowledge) differentiate between different types of calories (ie. 100cal of sugar vs. 100cal grains vs. 100cal lean chicken). Be careful to balance your diet by sticking to about equal proportions of lean meats and complex carbohydrates. Eat small amounts of good oils.
damian_ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-06, 10:24 AM   #10
howsteepisit
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
howsteepisit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Eugene, OR
Bikes: Mecian
Posts: 3,979
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 241 Post(s)
Thanks for all your support and good comments. My outside cycling days are winding down for the year, as winter starts early and can be bitter in Montana. I'll get in one maybe two more 50 miles rides, and maybe a few 30ish then thats it. I have been working on an indoor trainer for 60-70 minutes also, will continue through the winter. Part of my decision to start WW now is to try to get to a goal weight before the long distance cycling season starts next May. They now have whats called a core plan, which seems to be a "eat what you need" combination of lowish fat, low GI complex carbs, with lots of vegetable. Its the way I know I should eat anyway, but the structure helps. I'll keep you all posted as to energy levels and such over the winter and how everything goes.

Thanks You for your support
howsteepisit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-06, 10:30 AM   #11
crtreedude 
Third World Layabout
 
crtreedude's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Costa Rica
Bikes: Cannondale F900 and Tandem
Posts: 3,075
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 100 Post(s)
I will agree with the idea that you have to make sure to eat balanced amount of food. Carbs are primarily fuel that is easy to get to. Nice to have them available but you can cut back some on them to get going on weight loss - but be careful cutting back on protein and fat since you are going to need them to rebuild damaged tissue, etc. Or, to increase muscle mass.

There is no magic here - without protein and fat you can't rebuild and don't try to drop too much weight per week. Keep adjusting when you are not getting the results that you want. I have heard that more than 2 lbs per week is not to be expected. But, if you think about that, if you could do that all the time, you would drop 110 lbs a year.
crtreedude is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-06, 12:11 PM   #12
fopianki
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Bikes:
Posts: 129
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Three years ago I was 250...today I'm 164. I finally figured out that dieting was not the answer. My body cannot handle sugar or refined flours...it's called insulin resistance. If you gain a lot of visceral fat (in your belly) chances are you have it also. I eat whole grains, fresh fruits and vegies and lean meats. I also eat 5/6 meals a day...I don't count calories but I eat appropriate amounts. I also work out 5/6 days a week...I'm running the Chicago marathon next week. I also compete in triathlons, duathlons, etc. It was amazing how the weight just dropped off over several years...I averaged 1 lb per week. I now view sugar, refined flours, potatoes and refined rice as a poison to my system...they don't even taste good anymore! regards Frankp
fopianki is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-06, 12:15 PM   #13
howsteepisit
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
howsteepisit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Eugene, OR
Bikes: Mecian
Posts: 3,979
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 241 Post(s)
Frankp,

Both the wife and I are IR, she is really pre-diabetic. I have lost weight with low carb-very low calorie diet i the past (from 230 to 165) but could not maintain the eating program they advised. I think your approach is the best I can find, and that's basically the WW menu. Congratulations on the weight loss and even more the marathon and triathlons. Good luck in the CM.
howsteepisit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-06, 01:23 PM   #14
Nightshade
Humvee of bikes =Worksman
 
Nightshade's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Bikes:
Posts: 5,363
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by howsteepisit
Thanks for all your support and good comments. My outside cycling days are winding down for the year, as winter starts early and can be bitter in Montana. I'll get in one maybe two more 50 miles rides, and maybe a few 30ish then thats it. I have been working on an indoor trainer for 60-70 minutes also, will continue through the winter. Part of my decision to start WW now is to try to get to a goal weight before the long distance cycling season starts next May. They now have whats called a core plan, which seems to be a "eat what you need" combination of lowish fat, low GI complex carbs, with lots of vegetable. Its the way I know I should eat anyway, but the structure helps. I'll keep you all posted as to energy levels and such over the winter and how everything goes.

Thanks You for your support
And you plan to visit your doctor when?? In spite of the office call cost seeing your doctor could wind up
being money well spent so you don't damage your body by eating wrong even on a WW program.

If you don't get a doctor's once over you are truly foolish.
__________________
My preferred bicycle brand is.......WORKSMAN CYCLES
I dislike clipless pedals on any city bike since I feel they are unsafe.

Originally Posted by krazygluon
Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
Aluminum: barely a hundred, which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?
Nightshade is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-06, 02:18 PM   #15
howsteepisit
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
howsteepisit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Eugene, OR
Bikes: Mecian
Posts: 3,979
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 241 Post(s)
Tightwad,

I do in fact have an appointment to see my Dr, but I fail to see the reason for your second post on the topic. However in all honesty, I have never yet in my 50 years consulted a physician who was in the lest bit helpful on losing weight, of did anything substantial to evaluate my ability to exercise. The standard advise is to "eat moderately, lower fats, blah blah blah." So what could I expect from a Dr's visit that could clue me into eating "wrong even on a WW program"?
howsteepisit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-06, 02:23 PM   #16
Phatty
Super Clydesdale
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Ohio
Bikes: Giant OCR 3 Roadbike and Gary Fisher Marlin Mountain Bike
Posts: 5
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
howsteep,

Weight watchers is a good plan and it certainly accounts for long bike rides. When you exercise, you earn activity points that you can use to add to your daily food intake. As long as you take advantage of your activity points, you will certainly get enough fuel for your bike rides. In fact, after a 30+ mile bike ride, you can eat almost anything you want and not go over on your food points! I've been on the plan sice July and have lost almost 40 pounds ... I had already lost over 80 and weight watchers snapped me out of a slump. It will work for you.
Phatty is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-18-06, 01:46 PM   #17
ctoddrun
Back in the game...
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Keller, TX
Bikes: 1985 Trek 400; 1999 Specialized Rock Hopper (rigid, slicks); 2007 Crosscheck
Posts: 302
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I've been doing Weight Watchers with great succes -started at 282, am now at 214. The first 50+ pounds came off really fast, the last 30ish not so much, but the slowdown is due to my inability (lack of motivation) to stick to the program. I've read comments here about good/bad for very active folks.

Here's my take - check in with your meeting leader on a regular basis and review your progress. They SHOULD help you customize the plan based on your activity level and the results you're seeing. More points if you're not losing with activity, etc.If the flex plan (points) seems difficult to follow, don't be afraid to try the core plan - much easier to live with, so long as you can manage the portion-control issue (I'm struggling there...)

The WW "Good Health Guidelines" help you balance the kind of calories you get - they address fruits/veggies, protein, dairy, and healthy fats, along with a couple other non-caloric things. If you get all the daily requirements in you just won't have much allowance left for junky food, though you can eat it if you choose to and are willing to pay the price.

Overall I'm a HUGE (okay, not so huge as I once was believer in the WW plan. It's helped me, several in my family, and a number of other friends as well. Another great thing about it is that it is intended to get you where you want to be and TEACH YOU HOW TO STAY THERE.
ctoddrun is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-18-06, 09:16 PM   #18
guruguhan
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Bikes:
Posts: 272
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Hello fello clydes,

I just wanted to throw in what I've been doing lately, and why I think I had so many problems losing weight in the past. I was around 250, and I've lost 15lbs in the last month and a half.

I think the biggest thing is the mental stuff, at some point something just clicks. Once it does, I think you are halfway there, the rest is just maintaining a good outlook, do what makes you happy, and continue to enjoy good food.

My biggest eating disability was that I would usually only eat once a day, at the end of the day, but I'd eat enough for three people. It would be my form of a night cap and instead of falling asleep, I'd put myself into a semi-comatosed state and pass out. I think we all know what is healthy living, and what is not, but I wouldn't listen then (we all have other things on our minds). Now I'm trying to listen.

After the click happened, I went online (to mens health), and printed out some exercise plans (the abs diet). I also went to the local health food store and got some fat-burning, increase metabolism type stuff, I won't mention brands because I think many of the healthy ones work the same way. One of the things I bought is a meal-replacement shake thing (not slim-fast, but the same principle I think). This is my breakfast. It takes less than 30seconds to make, and it really does taste good (I get chocolate). Eating breakfast (or drinking it I guess) has made a big difference in my activity for the rest of the day. Again, I think we all know this, but it takes something to make us start doing this. In the past, when I would think "Ok, today you're going to have a good breakfast and do stuff." I'd make myself a couple eggs, potatoes, maybe a fried tomato and some toast. After eating, what was supposed to energize me, paralyzed me. The shake is just the right amount, I don't feel full, but I feel content and my brain starts to buzz a minute after drinking it. With this stuff I also take a pill thats supposed to metabolize fat, and then I take some omega3 tablets for the old noggin. For me, feeling good is the most important. If I'm happy, I can stick to it, and I don't feel like I'm working, or sacrficing anything.

So I have the shake at around 9am (this is usually, sometimes on the weekend, I do feel like a traditional breakfast, and I'll eat it - the shake just becomes my dinner - and remember, this is a guy who used to eat enough for three, three guys that is, not girls). At around 11am I'll eat a snack. There are tonnes of healthy snacks, I'll mention one that I love right now....apples and almond butter (this is so yummy). Usually, I dont need a snack by this time, but I eat it anyways, from what I've read the whole trick is to increase your metabolism, you need to eat (in small, but consistent quantities) to improve this. After about an 1hr I take another pill (also intented to increase metabolism). 1/2 hr after this, I eat lunch.

I love carbs (I might be able to say loved now). Good bread, pasta, rice. All the stuff I know people say is bad, I loved. But they were the first to go. They had to be. I just replaced it with protein. Lunch will be my biggest meal of the day usually, but its mostly protein. I like things like spaghetti and meatballs (can make enough meatballs to last for a month and freeze it, or whatever). I make big meatballs. Ummmm, meatballs. Then, instead of them sitting on a king-sized bed of pasta, I'll eat two of the meatballs, and then about 1/5 of the amount of pasta I used to eat. Just a small portion. After eating this, if I'm still hungry (which happened less and less as my stomach began to shrink), I'd eat maybe 10 almonds, some grapes, or other fruit (I've read that you can eat as much fruit as you like, so I do).

At 4pm its snack time again (for someone who only ate once a day, this is a lot of eating in one day). I like Ryvita and some nice old chedder/colby, yogurt, whatever. (I just think about the healthy food that I actually like). At around 7pm I take another metabolism pill, and an hr later, dinner. Dinner is again mostly protein, fruit and veggies, or the shake if I feel I ate a bit too much during the day.

For my late night snack, I'll eat almonds, or my favorite, some shake-and-bake style chicken. I guess eating protein instead of carbs before bed is good because protein increases insulin levels and makes you have a nice sleep. When I'd eat a carb-rich late night dinner, sure I'd go into a comatosed state, but I'd have horrible sleeps. I'm sleeping better now.

And then I wake up, the day begins again. I still get to think about food I like, and get to enjoy eating it. Its only the carbs that I have to watch, but the less I eat carb rich foods, the less I like them. Bread doesn't compare to meatballs!

This is all done at the same time as the exercise routine that I mentioned. Sure, sometimes I only have time to do it for 20-30mins. But I try to do it. there have been days when I said, nope, not today. But I don't beat myself up about it. I'm going for a lifestyle change, not a stint where I'm briefly pumped/pissed. I want to be happy. But even if I'm just sitting in front of the TV, I'll have some free weights sitting there and maybe do some curls, military press or something else (my "weight room" consits of two barbells and an EZ curl bar - since I weigh so much, my body is my primary weight). Instead of sitting on the sofa/chair, I'll lie down on the floor. I can relax when I need to, and if I feel like doing a few situps/pushups, I'm right there.

I couldn't do a sit-up for the life of me two months ago. My shoulders would get less than four inches off the ground I think (thats what it felt like at least). But I did them (the four inch situp), and over time it did work. I can do proper situps now, and more than I thought I'd be able to do. Pushups were the same. When I started, I couldn't do one. So I put down the blinds, and did women's pushups (I dont' know what they are called, and I don't want to offend any women here)...the ones where your knees are touching the floor. I did them for a while, and kept trying to do at least one real pushup before doing the womens pushups. One day I was able to do one. I did that one, and finished with more womens pushups, until I was too tired to do anymore. I can do 12 normal pushups now, and I still do womens pushups after finishing them to make sure I've completely exhausted myself. For me, seeing the development in my upper body (which is initially hard to see under the fat, but it is happening!) has been a source of happiness.

I'm also playing the sports I stopped playing since I was a kid, and I do feel like a kid again. Games are fun. And everyone here knows how fun biking is. As I start to tour (just getting into it), I'll probably start to increase my carb intake a bit to compensate, I'll let my body do the talking.

Anyways, I just wanted to say, be happy. I think its a good thing to find a way to enjoy the things that made you overweight, but in a healthy way. It becomes easier to control your appetite. I don't feel like I'm on a diet, I feel like I'm just eating differently.

Im not where I want to be, but I feel like I can do this, it hasn't been so hard (after the click).

Good luck to all of you.

PS: I know that wasn't WW related, but if it works, why not?!

Last edited by guruguhan; 10-18-06 at 09:28 PM.
guruguhan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-19-06, 10:15 AM   #19
Hambone
Senior Member
 
Hambone's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Bootiful Brooklyn, NY
Bikes: GT Edge for the road/Specialized Hopper (well the frame and the bb, everything else is new) for the dirt
Posts: 2,023
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by fopianki
Three years ago I was 250...today I'm 164. I finally figured out that dieting was not the answer. My body cannot handle sugar or refined flours...it's called insulin resistance. If you gain a lot of visceral fat (in your belly) chances are you have it also. I eat whole grains, fresh fruits and vegies and lean meats. I also eat 5/6 meals a day...I don't count calories but I eat appropriate amounts. I also work out 5/6 days a week...I'm running the Chicago marathon next week. I also compete in triathlons, duathlons, etc. It was amazing how the weight just dropped off over several years...I averaged 1 lb per week. I now view sugar, refined flours, potatoes and refined rice as a poison to my system...they don't even taste good anymore! regards Frankp
You cut sugar and simple carbs out of your life. That is a diet.
Hambone is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-19-06, 10:50 AM   #20
howsteepisit
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
howsteepisit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Eugene, OR
Bikes: Mecian
Posts: 3,979
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 241 Post(s)
Just an update, I am down about 7 pounds, after a 5.5 lb first week. I know that's a bit fast, but I figure the first week loss is primarily water fro reducing the massive amount of carbohydrate I had been eating. I am following the CORE plan, which is a limited carb plan, but likely somewhere in the 150-200 grams of carb a day., lean meats, lots of fruits and vegetables, and some dairy. Feeling good, but overall endurance is down a bit based on my indoor trainer sessions and two outdoor rides (3 hour duration outdoor at15-16 mph). Anyway, my wife and I are very happy with the results so far. Its a pain realizing that I really will not be able to increase my strength and fitness level much while I am losing weight, but its worth it!
howsteepisit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-19-06, 11:02 AM   #21
Hambone
Senior Member
 
Hambone's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Bootiful Brooklyn, NY
Bikes: GT Edge for the road/Specialized Hopper (well the frame and the bb, everything else is new) for the dirt
Posts: 2,023
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I'll post more later, I've been really busy.

I ride about 30 mi/day M-F. I try and get in a long ride on the weekend or some other big activity. Be it a century or a long ride pulling the kids to Coney Island or a hike or whatever.

I've done WW for about a year and lost about 70 pounds of the 150 I have to loose.

It was suggested that WW doesn't tell you what kinds of food to eat. This is between an incorrect and a simplistic view of the program. First, there are some foods it tells you to have at least x amount of each day. Second, the over ridding message of WW is eat good foods in healthy portions. Frequent topics of discussion are healthy alternatives to fattening foods.

Granted, you could stay within your daily point allowance and eat nothing but low-fat ice cream bars all day, but no responsible WW employee and no honest WW participant would suggest that that was what WW saw as a good idea.

Nothing better prepares you for a lifetime of healthy eating and activity than a successful Weight Watchers experience.

Feel free to ask or IM me if you have questions. (I am not affiliated with WW in any way -- other than going to the meetings.)
Hambone is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-19-06, 11:18 AM   #22
Hambone
Senior Member
 
Hambone's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Bootiful Brooklyn, NY
Bikes: GT Edge for the road/Specialized Hopper (well the frame and the bb, everything else is new) for the dirt
Posts: 2,023
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
guruguhan- Heck there's more than one way to skin a cat... (I can think of 7 or 8 without trying.) It sounds like this is working for you so more power to you! And good luck.

One thing though,
Quote:
Originally Posted by guruguhan
I guess eating protein instead of carbs before bed is good because protein increases insulin levels and makes you have a nice sleep.
I think your biophysiology is off here. Insulin is produced as a response to blood sugar (glyogen) levels. (I've got degrees in history and philosophy so if somebody with actual knowledge of this is around they can better answer than I -- like Tom.) Blood sugar levels don't change much from protein.

I would bet that you are noticing thisbeing better sleeping versus your past where you had a lot of carbs (aka sugars) for dinner then went to bed and your body was trying to work out the whole sugar/insulin yo-yo thing.

Either way, sounds like you have it dialed in.

I find if I make my own pasta from scratch, it is muchmore filling and satisfying. And it is a lot easier than you think. -hambone
Hambone is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-19-06, 11:54 AM   #23
kensuf
My idea of fun
 
kensuf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Gainesville, FL
Bikes: '06 Litespeed Tuscany, '02 Kona Lavadome, '07 Giant TCR Advanced, '07 Karate Monkey
Posts: 9,804
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I ate a big juicy 3/4lbs hamburger with blue cheese and bacon on it for lunch today.

It was yummy and a nice send-off before the two centuries I'm doing this weekend.

My diet starts next week.
kensuf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-06, 06:49 PM   #24
runnercyclist
Tires- 2 skinny, one fat
 
runnercyclist's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Bikes:
Posts: 185
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by guruguhan
Hello fello clydes,

I just wanted to throw in what I've been doing lately, and why I think I had so many problems losing weight in the past. I was around 250, and I've lost 15lbs in the last month and a half.

I think the biggest thing is the mental stuff, at some point something just clicks. Once it does, I think you are halfway there, the rest is just maintaining a good outlook, do what makes you happy, and continue to enjoy good food.

My biggest eating disability was that I would usually only eat once a day, at the end of the day, but I'd eat enough for three people. It would be my form of a night cap and instead of falling asleep, I'd put myself into a semi-comatosed state and pass out. I think we all know what is healthy living, and what is not, but I wouldn't listen then (we all have other things on our minds). Now I'm trying to listen.

After the click happened, I went online (to mens health), and printed out some exercise plans (the abs diet). I also went to the local health food store and got some fat-burning, increase metabolism type stuff, I won't mention brands because I think many of the healthy ones work the same way. One of the things I bought is a meal-replacement shake thing (not slim-fast, but the same principle I think). This is my breakfast. It takes less than 30seconds to make, and it really does taste good (I get chocolate). Eating breakfast (or drinking it I guess) has made a big difference in my activity for the rest of the day. Again, I think we all know this, but it takes something to make us start doing this. In the past, when I would think "Ok, today you're going to have a good breakfast and do stuff." I'd make myself a couple eggs, potatoes, maybe a fried tomato and some toast. After eating, what was supposed to energize me, paralyzed me. The shake is just the right amount, I don't feel full, but I feel content and my brain starts to buzz a minute after drinking it. With this stuff I also take a pill thats supposed to metabolize fat, and then I take some omega3 tablets for the old noggin. For me, feeling good is the most important. If I'm happy, I can stick to it, and I don't feel like I'm working, or sacrficing anything.

So I have the shake at around 9am (this is usually, sometimes on the weekend, I do feel like a traditional breakfast, and I'll eat it - the shake just becomes my dinner - and remember, this is a guy who used to eat enough for three, three guys that is, not girls). At around 11am I'll eat a snack. There are tonnes of healthy snacks, I'll mention one that I love right now....apples and almond butter (this is so yummy). Usually, I dont need a snack by this time, but I eat it anyways, from what I've read the whole trick is to increase your metabolism, you need to eat (in small, but consistent quantities) to improve this. After about an 1hr I take another pill (also intented to increase metabolism). 1/2 hr after this, I eat lunch.

I love carbs (I might be able to say loved now). Good bread, pasta, rice. All the stuff I know people say is bad, I loved. But they were the first to go. They had to be. I just replaced it with protein. Lunch will be my biggest meal of the day usually, but its mostly protein. I like things like spaghetti and meatballs (can make enough meatballs to last for a month and freeze it, or whatever). I make big meatballs. Ummmm, meatballs. Then, instead of them sitting on a king-sized bed of pasta, I'll eat two of the meatballs, and then about 1/5 of the amount of pasta I used to eat. Just a small portion. After eating this, if I'm still hungry (which happened less and less as my stomach began to shrink), I'd eat maybe 10 almonds, some grapes, or other fruit (I've read that you can eat as much fruit as you like, so I do).

At 4pm its snack time again (for someone who only ate once a day, this is a lot of eating in one day). I like Ryvita and some nice old chedder/colby, yogurt, whatever. (I just think about the healthy food that I actually like). At around 7pm I take another metabolism pill, and an hr later, dinner. Dinner is again mostly protein, fruit and veggies, or the shake if I feel I ate a bit too much during the day.

For my late night snack, I'll eat almonds, or my favorite, some shake-and-bake style chicken. I guess eating protein instead of carbs before bed is good because protein increases insulin levels and makes you have a nice sleep. When I'd eat a carb-rich late night dinner, sure I'd go into a comatosed state, but I'd have horrible sleeps. I'm sleeping better now.

And then I wake up, the day begins again. I still get to think about food I like, and get to enjoy eating it. Its only the carbs that I have to watch, but the less I eat carb rich foods, the less I like them. Bread doesn't compare to meatballs!

This is all done at the same time as the exercise routine that I mentioned. Sure, sometimes I only have time to do it for 20-30mins. But I try to do it. there have been days when I said, nope, not today. But I don't beat myself up about it. I'm going for a lifestyle change, not a stint where I'm briefly pumped/pissed. I want to be happy. But even if I'm just sitting in front of the TV, I'll have some free weights sitting there and maybe do some curls, military press or something else (my "weight room" consits of two barbells and an EZ curl bar - since I weigh so much, my body is my primary weight). Instead of sitting on the sofa/chair, I'll lie down on the floor. I can relax when I need to, and if I feel like doing a few situps/pushups, I'm right there.

I couldn't do a sit-up for the life of me two months ago. My shoulders would get less than four inches off the ground I think (thats what it felt like at least). But I did them (the four inch situp), and over time it did work. I can do proper situps now, and more than I thought I'd be able to do. Pushups were the same. When I started, I couldn't do one. So I put down the blinds, and did women's pushups (I dont' know what they are called, and I don't want to offend any women here)...the ones where your knees are touching the floor. I did them for a while, and kept trying to do at least one real pushup before doing the womens pushups. One day I was able to do one. I did that one, and finished with more womens pushups, until I was too tired to do anymore. I can do 12 normal pushups now, and I still do womens pushups after finishing them to make sure I've completely exhausted myself. For me, seeing the development in my upper body (which is initially hard to see under the fat, but it is happening!) has been a source of happiness.

I'm also playing the sports I stopped playing since I was a kid, and I do feel like a kid again. Games are fun. And everyone here knows how fun biking is. As I start to tour (just getting into it), I'll probably start to increase my carb intake a bit to compensate, I'll let my body do the talking.

Anyways, I just wanted to say, be happy. I think its a good thing to find a way to enjoy the things that made you overweight, but in a healthy way. It becomes easier to control your appetite. I don't feel like I'm on a diet, I feel like I'm just eating differently.

Im not where I want to be, but I feel like I can do this, it hasn't been so hard (after the click).

Good luck to all of you.

PS: I know that wasn't WW related, but if it works, why not?!
I down with "the click". To me it is will power and determination. Great job. I'm doing very similar stuff.
runnercyclist is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-06, 06:56 PM   #25
runnercyclist
Tires- 2 skinny, one fat
 
runnercyclist's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Bikes:
Posts: 185
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by kensuf
I ate a big juicy 3/4lbs hamburger with blue cheese and bacon on it for lunch today.

It was yummy and a nice send-off before the two centuries I'm doing this weekend.

My diet starts next week.
I'm not sure hamburger is a good protein for me. I am trying to stick to lean meats, lots of vegies, fruit, nuts, whole grain cereals and gallons of water a day.

Daily exercise as well.

We'll see.
runnercyclist is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:04 PM.