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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

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Old 10-29-06, 10:01 PM   #1
shumacher
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Back in the saddle, want to resume trials practice.

Since I'm new here, a little background may be in order. I was pleasantly surprised to find a forum with a focus on people who are not 125lbs! In my teens and early twenties, I was a fairly serious rider. I spent car-type money on a bike instead of my first car, and got around every bit as well, but always with my spare tire. I was skinny at seven, but gained weight soon after, and I've been mostly unable to shake it.

Now I'm thirty, I'm around 265lbs (and trending downward!) and 6'3", and while I can wear my clothes from my freshman year of high school, and got carded yesterday buying an R-rated movie, I'm feeling "non-youthful" for the first time. My blood pressure is on the higher side of normal where it was always very low before and my resting heart rate is on the high side of normal, where it was unusually low before. I didn't keep my promise to keep riding when I finally bought my first car, and while I eat somewhat better than I used to, I'm suffering the ill-effects of eleven-odd years out the saddle.

I have a '94 Specialized Rockhopper Comp (this is a rigid bike) that I used to practice trials techniques on, even though it's sized for normal MTB use. I can't claim much success getting air, though I did develop very good low speed handling skills. I had the bike gone over about nine months ago, but it has been almost unridden since. Fortunately, my niece is starting to learn to ride, thus I feel the bug coming on again.

My first move is to gradually get my muscles back, riding the Rockhopper and my 92 Cirrus Triple around as much as possible. I can work the jiggle back out of my trackstands too, as that's not too hard. Hopefully around the end of the year, I'll have some stamina and balance again, so I can get back to practicing.

I want to avoid brusing the hell out of my legs with the top tube, so I'm considering getting a smaller bike, just for this purpose. I'm looking towards what would be considered a "stock" and not a "mod" trials bike. I'm open to non-competition-legal bikes, as I won't be doing this for anyone but me.

That leads me to my question: for someone who weighs 265lbs, is 6'3", and ultimately wants to pound the hell out of a bike by jumping on and off of various surfaces, are there special considerations for the wheels and frame?
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Old 10-30-06, 05:54 AM   #2
Tom Stormcrowe
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shumacher
Since I'm new here, a little background may be in order. I was pleasantly surprised to find a forum with a focus on people who are not 125lbs! In my teens and early twenties, I was a fairly serious rider. I spent car-type money on a bike instead of my first car, and got around every bit as well, but always with my spare tire. I was skinny at seven, but gained weight soon after, and I've been mostly unable to shake it.

Now I'm thirty, I'm around 265lbs (and trending downward!) and 6'3", and while I can wear my clothes from my freshman year of high school, and got carded yesterday buying an R-rated movie, I'm feeling "non-youthful" for the first time. My blood pressure is on the higher side of normal where it was always very low before and my resting heart rate is on the high side of normal, where it was unusually low before. I didn't keep my promise to keep riding when I finally bought my first car, and while I eat somewhat better than I used to, I'm suffering the ill-effects of eleven-odd years out the saddle.

I have a '94 Specialized Rockhopper Comp (this is a rigid bike) that I used to practice trials techniques on, even though it's sized for normal MTB use. I can't claim much success getting air, though I did develop very good low speed handling skills. I had the bike gone over about nine months ago, but it has been almost unridden since. Fortunately, my niece is starting to learn to ride, thus I feel the bug coming on again.

My first move is to gradually get my muscles back, riding the Rockhopper and my 92 Cirrus Triple around as much as possible. I can work the jiggle back out of my trackstands too, as that's not too hard. Hopefully around the end of the year, I'll have some stamina and balance again, so I can get back to practicing.

I want to avoid brusing the hell out of my legs with the top tube, so I'm considering getting a smaller bike, just for this purpose. I'm looking towards what would be considered a "stock" and not a "mod" trials bike. I'm open to non-competition-legal bikes, as I won't be doing this for anyone but me.

That leads me to my question: for someone who weighs 265lbs, is 6'3", and ultimately wants to pound the hell out of a bike by jumping on and off of various surfaces, are there special considerations for the wheels and frame?
Bombproof wheels, high spoke count! I'd use DH wheelsets or tandem wheels for that purpose. Tandem wheels can run as high as 48 hole spoke count.
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Old 10-30-06, 06:13 AM   #3
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I'd do it on a steel frame. Rather have things bend then snap! Oh and click on my siggie

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Old 10-30-06, 05:12 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by Tom Stormcrowe
Bombproof wheels, high spoke count! I'd use DH wheelsets or tandem wheels for that purpose. Tandem wheels can run as high as 48 hole spoke count.
Tandems! I didn't even think of that. I'll have to have a look at the finished weight of those, but that might just be a great option. I've never had a problem on my old wheels, but with luck, I'll be tougher on the new ones.
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