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-   Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) (http://www.bikeforums.net/clydesdales-athenas-200-lb-91-kg/)
-   -   Bike/Wheel Input (http://www.bikeforums.net/clydesdales-athenas-200-lb-91-kg/257275-bike-wheel-input.html)

DLpuck 01-01-07 06:23 PM

Bike/Wheel Input
 
I'm hoping to return to to riding after a long hiatus (20 yrs) and to eventually lose my status as a Clyde sometime in the next year or so (5-9 - 250 Lbs.). I've been training for the last 3 months on an indoor stationary bike (LifeFitness C9i), ride 4-5 days per week (30-45 minutes per day) with one day a week up to about 90 minutes and 30 miles.
I've been surfing the Clyde forum for some time and would like to ask for some input.
I need to purchase a new road bike to do some daily and weekend riding once the weather here in Michigan is a little better. I also intend on buying an indoor trainer so that I can get used to riding a regular bike as opposed to the stationary bike all the time.
After visiting a number of LBS's in the area, I've settled on one very close to my home. They are recommending that I consider the Trek 1500 (they suggest it is a good bang for the buck) and it is in my price range. I was somewhat concerned with the Bontrager Select wheels (20 spoke pattern, 2 very close together in a 10 pair format). The LBS is assuring me they will be fine for my weight but I was wondering if anyone else has had any experience with these wheels lugging a Clyde's butt around city streets.
Any help will be appreciated.

Mr. Beanz 01-01-07 06:52 PM

I had those same exact wheels on my 05 Lemond. The rear lasted about 4000 miles(8 months), the front about a year and a half(app.8,0000 miles). I've posted pic afer pic over there but guys keep choosing 20 spoke wheels for speed over durability. C'mon man, we're clydes. I don't even bother posting in clyde wheel threads anymore cause they just don't listen, dammit!:D

I bougth the bike expecting the wheels to fail like so many other stock wheels. I built my currnet wheels even before, knowing.

The shop guys figure you won't ride much as a clyde big guy. If you don't, the wheels will last for 5 years if you do 500 miles a year. If you ride 4-7000 per year, you'll be lucky to get 12 months out of them.

Check out the other thread in the SoCal forum. Just came up a few hours ago about a "broken wheel, need sympathy". The rider is a big guy and is very strong. He needs strong wheels. If you're a rider, you'll need better wheels. I say use 'em til they fail then replace with better wheels.

And don't buy a bike for the wheels. That's usually where they skimp to keep prices low.:D

http://www.bikeforums.net/southern-california/257254-broken-wheel-need-sympathy.html

Tom Stormcrowe 01-01-07 10:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DLpuck
I'm hoping to return to to riding after a long hiatus (20 yrs) and to eventually lose my status as a Clyde sometime in the next year or so (5-9 - 250 Lbs.). I've been training for the last 3 months on an indoor stationary bike (LifeFitness C9i), ride 4-5 days per week (30-45 minutes per day) with one day a week up to about 90 minutes and 30 miles.
I've been surfing the Clyde forum for some time and would like to ask for some input.
I need to purchase a new road bike to do some daily and weekend riding once the weather here in Michigan is a little better. I also intend on buying an indoor trainer so that I can get used to riding a regular bike as opposed to the stationary bike all the time.
After visiting a number of LBS's in the area, I've settled on one very close to my home. They are recommending that I consider the Trek 1500 (they suggest it is a good bang for the buck) and it is in my price range. I was somewhat concerned with the Bontrager Select wheels (20 spoke pattern, 2 very close together in a 10 pair format). The LBS is assuring me they will be fine for my weight but I was wondering if anyone else has had any experience with these wheels lugging a Clyde's butt around city streets.
Any help will be appreciated.

Straight up.....I'm running a 40 spoke rear and 36 spoke front on my primary ride.....then again, I ride a touring bike. My Mountain bike also has 40/36 spoke combo. The bike I race with has 36/36 combo. I haven't had a wheel problem yet and do a light truing every couple of years and by the end of summer, I am still true as far as the wheels go.

yeamac 01-01-07 11:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DLpuck
Bontrager Select wheels (20 spoke pattern, 2 very close together in a 10 pair format)

Mavic Cosmos wheels came on my Bianchi Vigorelli purchased in November '06. They have 24 spoke front, 28 rear, spaced evenly. I have read a lot of good things about the Cosmos wheelset, which, in part, swayed my purchase decision toward the bike I have. I'm down to 215 from 230 back in early Nov.

From what I have read, 20 spoke pattern in a 10 pair format is not a good idea for a Clydesdale. I stayed away from bikes with these types of wheels when I was shopping. Sure, they would hold up in the short term, and could possibly last a long time. But the chance of the wheels getting damaged by a heavy rider is a lot greater with the type of spoke pattern you describe.

If I were you I'd look for a wheel with a higher spoke count and evenly spaced.

CliftonGK1 01-01-07 11:55 PM

I roll 32/32 3-cross on my bike, and I still have problems keeping things trued up for more than a month at a time. I'm slimming down and building up to buying a new bike (I've decided that as I hit my interim goals, I can buy more parts) and even with losing weight (I'm 260 now) I'll still be 230 when I reach my goal. I'm looking at putting 40/40 3-cross wheels on my new bike because I have no issues with sacrificing some extra weight to gain the strength and durability.

Sunman 01-02-07 12:40 AM

yeah!

01-02-07 02:56 AM

I've been pulling nipples through rims. I'm told it's because the wheels were cheap factory crap build quality, made by Taiwanese robots and sold by Performance Bike. They didn't stay true and the tensions were low and uneven. These were 32H Mavic Open Pro rims on Shimano Ultegra hubs. My most recent rear wheel lasted maybe 2500 miles because I had a pro re-tension and true it right after I got it.

Saturday I got my new rear wheel, built with a Velocity Deep V rim. Same 32H Ultegra hub, with 14ga DB Wheelsmith spokes and brass nipples, built from the start by the best wheel builder in the Bay Area (Doug at Cupertino Bike). He highly commends the Deep V as the strongest and most rigid out there - it's what he used when he was at Wheelsmith.

I'm looking forward to riding it to work tomorrow. I don't anticipate any more pull-thrus :D

DanteB 01-02-07 12:21 PM

I have my wheels built for me by my LBS. I use 32 hole Mavic Open Pro CD Ceramic wheels, 14 gauge straight black Wheelsmith spokes, brass nipples, 3 cross pattern on Campy Record hubs. I weigh 230, do double and triple centuries and ride 7-8,000 miles a year. I don't have problems with my wheel and have them checked and trued twice a year whether they need it or not. I use the ceramic wheels because they have better stopping power, especially in wet weather.

CliftonGK1 01-02-07 12:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bobsut
I've been pulling nipples through rims. I'm told it's because the wheels were cheap factory crap build quality, made by Taiwanese robots and sold by Performance Bike. They didn't stay true and the tensions were low and uneven.

My current Mavic XC717 on an XT hub was Performance purchase. It stayed true for about 2 rides before I had to bring it to my current wheel guy for a full de/re-tensioning. There were some spokes that were just about hanging on the nipple by 1 or two threads, that's how loose they were.
After the rebuild, it's been fine: No pull throughs, no weird rattle-out loose spokes, and it only needs trued about every 6 weeks (average for me, being 260 pounds and really beating on my wheels.)

DLpuck 01-02-07 07:36 PM

Thanks
 
Thanks for all the input. Much appreciated.

cohophysh 01-02-07 07:49 PM

Quote:

From what I have read, 20 spoke pattern in a 10 pair format is not a good idea for a Clydesdale.
interesting and you are probably right...an LBS I walked into said "no problem" with the wheels on the trek 1500. I went in months later and got the same story...however, when looking at a felt f-75..(different LBS) mentioned that wheel upgrade might be a good idea

BetweenRides 01-05-07 04:25 PM

I'm around 240 and have been riding on Mavic K Elites on two bikes for quite a few years. Much more dependable than any other wheels I've had. Had the first set (rear) rebuilt after 11,000 miles. They very rarely go out of true and combined I've only had two spoke breaks in 18,000 miles.

xlrogue 01-05-07 04:48 PM

When I bought my used Klein Quantum, it came with 24 spoke (wide spaced groups of 3) Gipiemme T Tre 30's, which broke 2 spokes on the rear and required multiple truings in the 3 weeks I rode them (I'm 6'3", 250). I've replaced them with Velocity Deep V's with Velocity hubs (28R, 24F) which are absolutely trouble free after 4 weeks and 500+miles.


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