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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

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Old 01-05-07, 05:15 PM   #1
65notch
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Clyde'able 700c bikes? Giant Cypress LX/SX vs. Kona Dew Dlx

Hey all,

I'm new to the forums and am new to biking in terms of really understanding the technology that is avail nowadays, along with all the specialized bikes out there. When I first started riding a bike, 20 years ago, I was 10 and I went through maybe 3 bmx style/huffy bikes until I was 17. The last bike I had was a 18/19" FS $250 Motiv bike from Costco, what a piece of garbage, I took it back and have not been riding for at least 2 years now.

I'm 6'3" pushin 260 now. I've decided part of my exercise routine and getting back into shape is that I am going to purchase a new bike. I forecast that I will primarily, 85%, be on the street/urban scene. I live in Northeast Los Angeles. The other 15% I hope to be more mountain biking, in the most loose since of the word, i.e. fire roads/trails. But nothing like the downhill racing/rock hopping stuff.

I think I've narrowed down my choices, at least until I read the responses, then I may have to start over again...

I like the idea of the 700c wheels/tires, that have just the slight knobbiness to them but give better traction on paved surface and something with less rolling resistance, but something that can take going up/off a curb, and still be decent on semi-off road/MTB'ing dirt/loose gravel/terrain.

Quite honestly, I've yet to test ride the bikes, which I should probably get to this weekend, but the ones I were eyeing are the:

Giant Cypress SX and

Kona Dew Deluxe

I think I would prefer a front suspension, like the Giant has, but understand I could likely add one to the Kona if I went with it. And I would like the idea of being able to add on some 26 x 1.9 MB tires if I was doing some more serious off road stuff.

My concerns are will the 700c wheels support my weight for what I want to do? And are the bikes generally suited for what I want to do.

Appreciate any opinions/suggestions,
thanks,
dave

Last edited by 65notch; 01-05-07 at 06:30 PM. Reason: spelling
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Old 01-05-07, 05:22 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 65notch
Hey all,

I'm new to the forums and am new to biking in terms of really understanding the technology that is avail nowadays, along with all the speciliased bikes out there. When I first started riding a bike, 20 years ago, I was 10 and I went through maybe 3 bmx style/huffy bikes until I was 17. The last bike I had was a 18/19" FS $250 Motiv bike from Costco, what a piece of garbage, I took it back and have not been riding for at least 2 years now.

I'm 6'3" pushin 260 now. I've decided part of my exercise routine and getting back into shape is that I am going to purchase a new bike. I forecast that I will primarily, 85%, be on the street/urban scene. I live in Northeast Los Angeles. The other 15% I hope to be more montian biking, in the most loose since of the word, i.e. fire roads/trails. But nothing like the downhill racing/rock hopping stuff.

I think I've narrowed down my choices, at least until I read the responses, then I may have to start over again...

I like the idea of the 700c wheels/tires, that have just the slight knobbiness to them but give better traction on paved surface and something with less rolling resistance, but something that can take going up/off a curb, and still be decent on semi-off road/MTB'ing dirt/loose gravel/terrain.

Quite honestly, I've yet to test ride the bikes, which I should probably get to this weekend, but the ones I were eyeing are the:

Giant Cypress SX and

Kona Dew Deluxe

I think I would prefer a front suspension, like the Giant has, but understand I could likely add one to the Kona if I went with it. And I would like the idea of being able to add on some 26 x 1.9 MB tires if I was doing some more serious off road stuff.

My concerns are will the 700c wheels support my weight for what I want to do? And are the bikes generally suited for what I want to do.

Appreciate any opinions/suggestions,
thanks,
dave
If you want the larger wheel size, look at a 29'er, or a Cyclocross bike. Unsuspended, but suspension ain't all it's cracked up to be. I'd go with a high spoke count as well. I run 40 spoke rear and 36 spoke front, but I ride a touring bike w/ 27" wheels. Of course those 27" 40 and 36 spoke wheels are 20 years old!
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Old 01-05-07, 05:32 PM   #3
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What wheels do they come with?

There's a few good wheel discussions in my sig - the wheels are the most important part of the bike. Lot of people like the Mavic Open Pros (except for Far Horizon who was almost killed by them). You're my weight - there's quite a few heavier Clydes who ride 700c wheels without a problem.

Check out some of those wheel threads, ride a few bikes this weekend, and see what the lbs will do to swap out the stock wheels with something a little beefier.

If you're looking to loose weight you want a bike you can spend hours on and get lots of mileage on - for most people that will be on the road. If you look at Cyclocross bikes you can get a separate set of tires, use knobby ones for offroad and slicks for onroad. Built to take a beating.

Suspension is pretty overrated - if you really want to have suspension make sure you can 'lock it out' to turn it into an unsuspended bike. Especially things like hills the suspension just eats up the energy you put out.
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Old 01-05-07, 07:01 PM   #4
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What wheels do they come with?
Spokes 15g front and 14g rear stainless DT
Tires Continental Country RIDE 700x37c
Rims Sun MZ 14


Any thoughts about the specs? Other than just the wheels?

Here are the complete specs...

Frame sizes C49cm, C52cm, C54cm, C56cm, C58cm, C60cm
Frame tubing Kona 7005 Butted Aluminum
Fork Kona P2 700c disc
Braze-on fittings 2 bottles, fenders, rear rack
Headset TH
Crankarms FSA Alpha Drive
Chainrings 48/36/26
B/B RPM 7420ST
Pedals Wellgo LU-A9 w/ Toe clips and straps
Chain Shimano CN-HG50
Freewheel Shimano CS-HG40 ( 8-SPD, 11-34T)
F/D Shimano Acera-X
R/D Shimano Deore
Shifters Shimano Rapidfire
Handlebar Kona Riser
Stem Kona Control
Grips Kona Jack****
Brakes Hayes MX4 Mechanical
Brake Levers Avid FR-5
Front hub KK Disc
Rear hub Shimano FH-M475 disc
Spokes 15g front and 14g rear stainless DT
Tires Continental Country RIDE 700x37c
Rims Sun MZ 14
Saddle WTB PURE V SPORT
Seatpost Kona Thumb
Seat clamp Kona QT
Color Grey
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Old 01-05-07, 07:04 PM   #5
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Conversly, the Cypress SX have the following wheel specs:

rims Xero XSR-3 Disc 28H
hubs Xero XSR-3 Disc 28H
spokes Xero XSR-3
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Old 01-05-07, 08:46 PM   #6
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I have been riding a hyrid with front suspension and I have learned to hate it. It will be removed and replaced once the tax man gives me back some of my money.
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Old 01-05-07, 08:48 PM   #7
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I have been riding a hyrid with front suspension and I have learned to hate it. It will be removed and replaced once the tax man gives me back some of my money.
Brian, buy yourself a full on roadie! Keep the hybrid for light trailwork and a bad weather bike!
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Old 01-05-07, 09:28 PM   #8
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Brian, buy yourself a full on roadie! Keep the hybrid for light trailwork and a bad weather bike!
I told myself that I would not buy a new bike until I hit my goal weight. My wife is holding my feet to the fire on this . I have really caught the bug and keep looking and dreaming, Orbea Orca is the new dream bike at the moment, but that just drives my desire to reach my goal. Until then I am making small changes to my existing bike to make my rides better. I plan to keep this one for the weather rides, but the front fork has to go. I can't lock it out so the front end dives on me and I don't like it. I've only change a couple of things so far and got the bike for free so I figure I am ahead of the ball game.
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Old 01-05-07, 11:40 PM   #9
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The Cypress SX is a road-oriented hybrid. It has road bike gearing, with a low-rise handlebar. It isn't a bad choice for the usage that you describe. A full drop-bar, thin tire road bike will never handle the off-road trail you describe.

OTOH, the Kona has mountain bike gearing, with smaller cranks in the front and larger sprockets in the rear cassette. So it would be somewhat slower but better on hills.

You could consider the Gary Fisher dual sport series bikes, that are mountain bikes that have been given a little bit better road manners. Models like the Kaitai or Utopia. Or the Cronus

Marin has a couple in the vein of the Cypress SX, like the Point Reyes and Novata.

And Specialized seems to think they have one for road and trail, but the tires are on the wide side for a lot of road usage:
http://www.specialized.com/bc/SBCBkModel.jsp?spid=21925

That's a tough double duty for a bike.
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Old 01-06-07, 10:22 PM   #10
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I just bought the Dew Deluxe 62cm. Now it's my first bike (as an adult), so I don't have a basis for comparison, but I love it. I did test-ride a few others, but not the other one you're looking at.
I like the bike a lot. I'm 6'2" and 245#, (down 4-5 pounds in the first two weeks!). The 37mm tires are all the suspension you'll need. I rode a schwinn something-flat-bar-road-bikeish-with-front-suspension (yes! that's the official model designation! :-) and I felt like the first third of my pedal stroke was compressing the fork tubes instead of moving foreward. Not that I'm against suspension; I loved it on my motorcycle.

The Dew Deluxe is a bike I've found to be very easily customizable. I had considered bar ends, but ended up getting a Scott AT2 "mountain combination bar". It's kind of like a bullhorn bar, but sized to fit the flat-bar stems, takes my Rapidfire trigger shifters, and regular bar tape. Better feel than the kiddie/BMX grips, and more hand options.

I have class four days a week, so I've commited to making myself commute at least four days a week. 4.5 miles one way, mildly rolling terrian, reasonably good pavement. (So far, so good!) I got a rear rack & panniers, full fenders, Brooks B17 (on the recommendation of someone here), the aforementioned combo' bars, the requisite bottle/cage and light kit. I got a pair of shorts which I intend to use on sunny Saturdays, but Monday through Thursday, I ride in jeans, tee shirt, light jacket, and my old U.S.N. watch cap (which ends up coming off half way to campus.)

I like owning a road bike made by a mountain bike company. My Deluxe is not terribly light, but the if there's a weight-related performance problem on the ride, then PEBCAK. It *is* really tough and beefy feeling, though I doubt I'm really stressing it on my epic 100 watt suburban commute. The gearing that everyone else calls low (compared to the general run of road bikes) is perfect for a guy carrying 35 pounds of school books & sundry bike-related stuff, and 50 (now 45!) pounds of superfluous, well-marbled, tasty-to-Uruk-hai man flesh.

Good Luck!
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Old 01-06-07, 10:52 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RDRomano
I just bought the Dew Deluxe 62cm. Now it's my first bike (as an adult), so I don't have a basis for comparison, but I love it. I did test-ride a few others, but not the other one you're looking at.
I like the bike a lot. I'm 6'2" and 245#, (down 4-5 pounds in the first two weeks!). The 37mm tires are all the suspension you'll need. I rode a schwinn something-flat-bar-road-bikeish-with-front-suspension (yes! that's the official model designation! :-) and I felt like the first third of my pedal stroke was compressing the fork tubes instead of moving foreward. Not that I'm against suspension; I loved it on my motorcycle.

The Dew Deluxe is a bike I've found to be very easily customizable. I had considered bar ends, but ended up getting a Scott AT2 "mountain combination bar". It's kind of like a bullhorn bar, but sized to fit the flat-bar stems, takes my Rapidfire trigger shifters, and regular bar tape. Better feel than the kiddie/BMX grips, and more hand options.

I have class four days a week, so I've commited to making myself commute at least four days a week. 4.5 miles one way, mildly rolling terrian, reasonably good pavement. (So far, so good!) I got a rear rack & panniers, full fenders, Brooks B17 (on the recommendation of someone here), the aforementioned combo' bars, the requisite bottle/cage and light kit. I got a pair of shorts which I intend to use on sunny Saturdays, but Monday through Thursday, I ride in jeans, tee shirt, light jacket, and my old U.S.N. watch cap (which ends up coming off half way to campus.)

I like owning a road bike made by a mountain bike company. My Deluxe is not terribly light, but the if there's a weight-related performance problem on the ride, then PEBCAK. It *is* really tough and beefy feeling, though I doubt I'm really stressing it on my epic 100 watt suburban commute. The gearing that everyone else calls low (compared to the general run of road bikes) is perfect for a guy carrying 35 pounds of school books & sundry bike-related stuff, and 50 (now 45!) pounds of superfluous, well-marbled, tasty-to-Uruk-hai man flesh.

Good Luck!
Sounds great RD! Good plan!

Congrats on losing the tasty flesh......it makes you more attractive to the ladies and less attractive to Orcs!
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Old 01-06-07, 11:24 PM   #12
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Quote:
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Brian, buy yourself a full on roadie! Keep the hybrid for light trailwork and a bad weather bike!
I spotted a craig's list bike tonight for a very reasonable price. The wife even said that it might be too good to pass up, so I am going to look at it tomorrow. Seems to be a hodge podge of components, but all good names. the guy did not know who made the bike, but from the very, very small sized pictures, it looks clean and is kept inside. So here hoping. Will take pictures and get opinions tomorrow.
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Old 01-06-07, 11:34 PM   #13
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My opinion is thus:
Bike components found on higher end bikes (ie: non Cosco bikes) are all about the same when compared to other bikes of the same price category. I know I'll get flamed for that but the truth is that my Shimano Alivio derailleur has held up just as well as my Deore XT which costs 3-4 fold the alivio price. Performance is another issue but the fact is that my Alivio has given me well over 5000 miles of trouble free sevice and I was 360lbs when I started riding on it. The same goes for the brakes, shifters, etc that I have used.
When it comes to us heavier guys the main thing is properly built wheels. Mr. Stormcrow (Tom, is that your real last name?) knows this more than anyone and his advice should not be taken lightly.
At my heaviest I quashed (yes, I meant to type quashed) almost half a dozen wheelsets before finally dropping some bones on a set of handbuilt 36 spoke wheels. A year and over 4000 miles later and they are still true.
Now here is my advice. A set of 36 spoke wheels should do the trick for you so long as they are properly tensioned and stress releived. <-- that probably means nothing to you though
Both bikes you are looking at have good components. If you have the money to spend you should get better wheels. I'm not sure the cost of a set of handbuilt 700c wheels but am sure someone else can point you in the right direction
Anyhow, I'm tired and it is late so I'll end with this statement.
The guys in here know what they are talking about more than anyone else on these forums so please don't take their input lightly.
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Old 01-07-07, 12:24 PM   #14
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Well went to look at the bike from Craig's List and the frame is unknown, it quite possible could be a custom built frame, owner it is not sure. Said he go it from a bike shop owner or mechanic in Tallahassee. No serial numbers. Was a little short for me, so I had to pass. Frame size probably 56-58cm. Campagolo crank and hubs. Cinelli stem and handlebars. Shimano 105 front Derailleur and brake levers. Shimano 6600 rear derailer. Bar end shifters and Mavic MA2 rims. Very clean bike and Conti tires are in very good condition. He only wants $200.00

If anyone is interested here is the add: http://jacksonville.craigslist.org/bik/256730894.html
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Old 01-08-07, 01:51 AM   #15
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The best components in the world won't help if the bike doesn't fit properly. Like Johnnie Cochrane said, "If the bike don't fit, you must decline to invest in a conclusion of dubious logical foundation."
(I think that's what he said.) On the other hand, proper fit covers over a multitude of sins. Being a thirty-year-old undergraduate with an impending wedding, I know all about being on a budget, but someone once said, "I'm poor enough that I can't afford to buy cheap things." I looked on eBay and CL, and ultimately concluded that I wanted a solid LBS to fit me well, and sell me a reasonalbe bike for reasonable money. I learned that lesson two years ago when I bought a $1,300 '78 Caddy Eldorado Biarritz because it was cool "cheap transportaion." Uh huh. I don't even want to think about how much it *ended up* costing me. I love the idea of buying used, but I also know that I don't know enough to buy used and be sure I'm getting what I need and really want. I hope to find or cobble together a used fixed gear after about a year or so of solid riding on my Dew Deluxe, on the premise that by then I willl have a picture of myself as a rider to buy accurately for myself.
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Old 01-08-07, 03:54 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Bombadil
The Cypress SX is a road-oriented hybrid. It has road bike gearing, with a low-rise handlebar. It isn't a bad choice for the usage that you describe. A full drop-bar, thin tire road bike will never handle the off-road trail you describe.

OTOH, the Kona has mountain bike gearing, with smaller cranks in the front and larger sprockets in the rear cassette. So it would be somewhat slower but better on hills.

You could consider the Gary Fisher dual sport series bikes, that are mountain bikes that have been given a little bit better road manners. Models like the Kaitai or Utopia. Or the Cronus

Marin has a couple in the vein of the Cypress SX, like the Point Reyes and Novata.

And Specialized seems to think they have one for road and trail, but the tires are on the wide side for a lot of road usage:
http://www.specialized.com/bc/SBCBkModel.jsp?spid=21925

That's a tough double duty for a bike.
Thanks for the info Tom. I was just turned onto Marin and Redline this weekend as possible alternatives as well. Anybody have any opinions on those two manufacturers?
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Old 01-08-07, 04:00 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by RDRomano
I just bought the Dew Deluxe 62cm....The Dew Deluxe is a bike I've found to be very easily customizable. I had considered bar ends, but ended up getting a Scott AT2 "mountain combination bar". It's kind of like a bullhorn bar, but sized to fit the flat-bar stems, takes my Rapidfire trigger shifters, and regular bar tape. Better feel than the kiddie/BMX grips, and more hand options.

I like owning a road bike made by a mountain bike company...

Good Luck!

RDRomano, thanks for the input. Have you A. Either ridden this bike in a trail setting and AB. If not, what are your impressions on how the bike would do on a packed dirt type of trail?

Dave
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Old 01-08-07, 04:33 PM   #18
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Hi,

I have a 2006 Kona Dew Deluxe that i love... great on the road, paved MUTs, and dirt fire roads. I only changed the seat and pedals so far... and I may put my 30 year old B17 one of these days. I am just getting back into riding, and so far this has been a great bike for me. I seems strong... size 54, and I am borderline Clyde.

Have fun... Pete
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Old 01-08-07, 05:01 PM   #19
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Thanks for the info Tom. I was just turned onto Marin and Redline this weekend as possible alternatives as well. Anybody have any opinions on those two manufacturers?
Redline is EXCELLENT! Marin has a great rep as well!
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Old 01-09-07, 07:16 PM   #20
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Hi, ...I have a 2006 Kona Dew Deluxe that i love... great on the road, paved MUTs, and dirt fire roads. I only changed the seat and pedals so far... and I may put my 30 year old B17 one of these days. I am just getting back into riding, and so far this has been a great bike for me. I seems strong... size 54, and I am borderline Clyde.
Have fun... Pete
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Stormcrowe
Redline is EXCELLENT! Marin has a great rep as well!

Thanks to you both...I think what I'd like to do, is gather a list of the specs on the different bikes from the different manufacturers and post, what seemingly appears, to be the most important specs on a bike for a big guy like myself, and then possibly have you guys comment, if you wouldn't mind that is.
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Old 01-09-07, 07:19 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by 65notch
Thanks to you both...I think what I'd like to do, is gather a list of the specs on the different bikes from the different manufacturers and post, what seemingly appears, to be the most important specs on a bike for a big guy like myself, and then possibly have you guys comment, if you wouldn't mind that is.
Fine with me!
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Old 01-10-07, 12:18 AM   #22
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Here is a pretty long and extensive list of some bikes and models w/ specs. that "seem" like the type of bike I'd like. I've tried to teach myself as much as possible in the 2 short weeks that I've researched bikes, but I just don't have a good grasp on what components are for what and the quality therein.

If any of you would not mind glancing over them and giving me your opinions, I'd be greatly appreciated. Moreover, the specs do not appear to be listed uniformly in order, so I apologize if that makes it more difficult for you guys to read. But I figured most you are bike-heads in these forums and could probably recognize the makes' alpha-numeric name and know what it is/for anyhow.

Now, for terms of my use etc...I was really hoping to not spend more than $700 (including tax) on a bike, but obivously that's a guideline, if the bike is suggested, and it feels "better", than I'd consider spending a little more. I think most of the bikes fit that criteria, except for maybe one of the Marins and a GF.

In the beginning, I will likely do only 15% of "off-road" stuff and that would be limited to fire trails and I hard packed "dirt bike trails" that already have had a good working/smoothing over etc...nothing with substantial "rocky/pebbly" type of terrain. I will primarily use this on the road, in the city and am thinking of also getting one of those "trailer tandem-add on bikes" (for my 6 y/o son and later to be used by my younger daughter).

I'm 6'3 270 now and I'd like to, when there's not a sidewalk ramp around and I have to get up/off the sidewalk, that I have the option of being able to go up and off the curb, but not haphazardly mind you, with the 700 wheels and not be worried I am gunna bust my wheel/tire everytime; or other similiar situations. I'd also like the ability to be able to swap out the 700's for 26's w/o changing the fork. I've been told some of the bikes I've looked at is a possibility, with thinner style 26's, i.e. 26x1.9's, so I could do a little more rugged MTB stuff in future.

I originally thought i also wanted a front suspension, but 90% of the consensus is that I probably don't even need that.

I apologize for the length, and hope you don't mind reading, I am just trying to provide as much info so anyone who would like could suggest a bike that they think might be a good fit for me...thanks in advance for your help! These forums have definetly given me the most amount of information thus far and I feel I am close to getting the right bike for me, but want to narrow down some of the choices before I go and test ride my short list.

Ohh and also if you could explain to me why you think bike XYZ is better or I should choose it, I thank you for that also, as I want to learn as well why people would choose one bike over another etc...

And as a note, there is ony bike here with 26" wheels, but appears to have road style tires, the GF Cronus.

Now without further ado...

Redline R550
Double Butted 6061 Aluminum
Carbon Fork / Wide Tire Clearance
FSA Integrated
FSA Compact Triple 50/39/30T
FSA Alloy Cup, JIS
Redline ATB Flat, 6061 Aluminum
31.8mm
Redline Cold Forged 2014
Aluminum
Redline, 3D Forged 6061 Aluminum
Velo Comfort
SRAM PG950, 11-26T, 9S
KMC Z9000, 9S
SHIMANO®, SL-R440 Flat Bar 9s
SHIMANO®, FD-R443, 9S
SHIMANO®, Sora RD-3300 GS, 9S
Wellgo Road w/Half Clip
Tektro R730 Long Reach
Tektro
Alex AKX-R1.0
Kenda Kwest, 700 x 25c
Velo Plush

Redline R540
Double Butted 6061 Aluminum
6061 Aluminum
FSA Integrated
FSA Triple Forged
Aluminum 48/38/28T
VP Sealed
Redline Flat ATB Aluminum
Redline Aluminum
Redline Aluminum
Velo ATB Grip
SRAM PG850 12-26T 8S
KMC Z30, 8S
SRAM Sx-5 Triggers 8S
SHIMANO® FD-T301
SRAM Sx-5 Medium Cage, 8S
Wellgo Road w/Half Clip
Tektro Long Reach, Side Pull
Promax
Redline/Alex 32H F/R Stainless
Spokes
Kenda Kwick Roller, 700 x 26c
Velo Plush

Gary Fisher Kaitai
Main frame Gold Series aluminum | Genesis 29" Geometry
Fork SR NRX6500 w/Lock-Out | 63mm travel
Headset Aheadset | Semi-cartridge | Sealed
Bottom bracket Cartridge
Crank Shimano TX71 48/38/28
Pedals Alloy platform
Front derailleur Shimano C102
Rear derailleur Shimano Alivio
Shifters Shimano EF50
Cassette SRAM PG830 | 11-32 | 8spd
Chain Shimano IG51
Front hub Superstock Disc
Front rim Bontrager Ranger
Front spokes 14G Stainless Steel
Rear hub Superstock Disc
Rear rim Bontrager Ranger
Rear spokes 14G Stainless Steel
Front Tire IRC Mythos XC 700x42c
Rear tire IRC Mythos XC 700x42c
Front brake Avid BB5 mechanical disc | 6" rotor
Rear brake Avid BB5 mechanical disc | 6" rotor
Brake levers Shimano EF50
Handlebar Bontrager Crowbar Sport
Stem Bontrager Sport | 10d rise
Grips Bontrager Race Lite
Saddle Bontrager Race Lux
Seatpost Bontrager Sport

Gary Fisher Cronus
Main frame Gold Series butted aluminum | Genesis Geometry
Fork Bontrager Switchblade ATB
Headset Aheadset, semi-cartridge, sealed
Bottom bracket Cartridge
Crank Bontrager 38t w/chainguard
Pedals Alloy platform
Rear derailleur SRAM X.7
Shifters SRAM X.7 Trigger (rear only)
Cassette SRAM PG950 | 11-34 | 9spd
Chain Shimano HG73 Rust Buster
Front wheel Shimano M475 disc hubs, Bontrager Ranger Disc rims
Rear wheel Shimano M475 disc hubs, Bontrager Ranger Disc rims
Front Tire Bontrager Satellite Plus 26x1.5" puncture resistant
Rear tire Bontrager Satellite Plus 26x1.5" puncture resistant
Front brake Avid BB 5 mechanical disc, 6" rotor
Rear brake Avid BB 5 mechanical disc, 6" rotor
Brake levers Avid FR 5
Handlebar Bontrager Crowbar Sport
Stem Bontrager Sport, 10d rise
Grips Bontrager Race Lite
Saddle Bontrager Race Lux
Seatpost Bontrager Sport

Gary Fisher Utopia
Main frame Gold Series aluminum | Genesis 29" Geometry
Fork Manitou Empire Elite | 75mm travel
Headset Aheadset | Semi-cartridge | Sealed
Bottom bracket TruVativ ISIS GigaPipe
Crank Bontrager Select 48/36/26
Pedals Alloy platform
Front derailleur Shimano M510 Deore
Rear derailleur Shimano XT
Shifters Shimano M510 Deore
Cassette SRAM PG950 | 11-34 | 9spd
Chain Shimano HG73
Front hub Superstock Disc
Front rim Bontrager Ranger
Front spokes 14G Stainless Steel
Rear hub Superstock Disc
Rear rim Bontrager Ranger
Rear spokes 14G Stainless Steel
Front Tire IRC Mythos XC 700x42c
Rear tire IRC Mythos XC 700x42c
Front brake Avid BB5 mechanical disc | 6" rotor
Rear brake Avid BB5 mechanical disc | 6" rotor
Brake levers Tektro RS360A
Handlebar Bontrager Crowbar Select
Stem Bontrager Select | 10d rise
Grips Bontrager Race Lite
Saddle Bontrager Race Lux
Seatpost Bontrager Select


Marin Mill Valley The following info was taken from Rei-Outlet, it doesn't appear as complete as previous ones and I'm not too sure this is made anymore either:
Frame Aluminum 7005 w carbon seat stays
Fork Rigid carbon
Crankset FSA Gossamer Triple, 53/42/30
Shifters Shimano SL-R440
Brakes Avid Single Digit 5
Brake levers Avid Speed Dial 7
Front derailleur Shimano Tiagra
Rear derailleur Shimano Tiagra
Head set Double sealed
Bottom bracket Cartridge sealed
Rear cog SRAM PG-950, 9-speed 12-26
Front hub Shimano WH-R500
Rear hub Shimano WH-R500
Rims Shimano WH-R500
Tires Vittoria Zaffiro Folding, 700x28
Stem FSA OS140
Handlebar Aluminum 6061-series
Seat post FSA SL-280, 6061 alloy
Saddle WTB Shadow V Extra Comp
Pedals Composite
Chain Shimano HG53


Marin Lucas Valley
Frame: 7005 Aluminum, Full Triple Butted Edge II Shaped Tubing with Carbon Seat Stays and Double Butted Tri-Burner Chain Stays
Fork: Carbon Monocoque Rigid 11/8”
Headset: Double Sealed, 1 1/8”, Threadless
Rear Hub: Formula, 32 Hole
Front Hub: Formula, 28 Hole
Spokes: 14 Gauge Stainless with Brass Nipples
Rims: Alex DC-19, Double Wall, 28 Hole Front, 32 Hole Rear with CNC Side Walls
Tires: Kenda Road, 700 x 28c
Shifters: Shimano ST-R225, EZ-Fire Plus, 8 Speed
Front Der: Shimano R453
Rear Der: Shimano Tiagra
Cassette: 12-24, 8 Speed
Chain: Shimano HG40
Crankset: FSA CFM, 52/42/30
Bottom Bracket: Sealed Cartridge
Seatpost: Comp Alloy Micro Adjust, 27.2mm x 300mm
Saddle: WTB Silverado Sport with Comfort Zone
Hndlebar: Double Butted 6061 Alloy, OS-31.8mm, Flat
Stem: FSA OS170 Threadless with Alloy Face Plate and 31.8mm Bar Clamp
Grips: Dual Density
Brakes: Forged Alloy Linear Pull with Front Power Modulator
Brake levers: Shimano with Integrated Shifters
Pedals: Composite with Alloy Cage


Marin Fairfax
7005 Aluminum, Full Triple Butted Edge II Shaped Tubing with Double Butted Tri-Burner Seat and Chain Stays
Carbon Monocoque Rigid 1 1/8”
Double Sealed, 1 1/8”, Threadless
Formula, 32 Hole
Formula, 28 Hole
14 Gauge Stainless with Brass Nipples
Alex DC-19, Double Wall, 28 Hole Front, 32 Hole Rear with CNC Side Walls
Kenda Road, 700 x 28c
Shimano ST-R225, EZ-Fire Plus, 8 Speed
Shimano R453
Shimano RD-2200
12-24, 8 Speed
Shimano HG40
TruVativ Touro 3.0, 52/42/30
Sealed Cartridge
Suspension Post, 27.2mm x 300mm
WTB Speed V Sport SE with Love Channel and Comfort Zone
Double Butted 6061 Alloy, Flat
Marin Alloy, Threadless
Dual Density
Forged Alloy Linear Pull with Front Power Modulator
Shimano with Integrated Shifters
Composite with Alloy Cage

Kona Dew Deluxe
Frame tubing Kona 7005 Butted Aluminum
Fork Kona P2 700c disc
Braze-on fittings 2 bottles, fenders, rear rack
Headset TH
Crankarms FSA Alpha Drive
Chainrings 48/36/26
B/B RPM 7420ST
Pedals Wellgo LU-A9 w/ Toe clips and straps
Chain Shimano CN-HG50
Freewheel Shimano CS-HG40 ( 8-SPD, 11-34T)
F/D Shimano Acera-X
R/D Shimano Deore
Shifters Shimano Rapidfire
Handlebar Kona Riser
Stem Kona Control
Grips Kona Jack****
Brakes Hayes MX4 Mechanical
Brake Levers Avid FR-5
Front hub KK Disc
Rear hub Shimano FH-M475 disc
Spokes 15g front and 14g rear stainless DT
Tires Continental Country RIDE 700x37c
Rims Sun MZ 14
Saddle WTB PURE V SPORT
Seatpost Kona Thumb
Seat clamp Kona QT

Kona Dew FS
Frame tubing Kona 7005 Butted Aluminum
Fork Suntour NEX-4510 MLO
Braze-on fittings 2 bottles, fenders, rear rack
Headset TH
Crankarms FSA Alpha Drive
Chainrings 48/36/26
B/B RPM 7420ST
Pedals Wellgo LU-A9 w/ Toe clips and straps
Chain Shimano CN-HG73
Freewheel Shimano DEORE (8spd, 11-34T)
F/D Shimano Deore
R/D Shimano Deore
Shifters Shimano Deore
Handlebar Kona Riser
Stem Kona Control
Grips Kona Jack****
Brakes Hayes MX4 Mechanical
Brake Levers Avid FR-5
Front hub KK Disc
Rear hub Shimano FH-M475 disc
Spokes 15g front and 14g rear stainless DT
Tires Continental CountryRIDE 700x37c
Rims Sun MZ 14
Saddle WTB PURE V SPORT
Seatpost Kona Suspension
Seat clamp Kona QR

Last edited by 65notch; 01-10-07 at 12:24 AM.
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Old 01-10-07, 09:57 AM   #23
RDRomano
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Whoa! there, Killer.
If you'll go back over the thread, I think you'll be able to narrow down these choices pretty rapidly. The consensus (I'm pretty sure) is that given a) the smallish amount of dirt-riding yoou plan on doing, and b) the tremendous (sp?) energy wasted - in terms of pedal stroke - that anything with front suspension is not going to be the best for you. So the Kaitai, Utopia, and the Dew FS (doofus).

Next, I think the consensus of the board is that any rim with <32 spokes will be likely problematic, 32 spoke could go either way (especially depending on the tires) and wheels with >32 spokes should be somewhere in the "plenty 'nuff" to "gross overkill" depending on exact specs and build quality. That knocks out the Marin Lucas Valley and Fairfax with their 28-hole front rims.

Related to that is the tire question. every LBS guy (even the ones who were trying to sell me race bike replicas), every senior forum member here, and many of the messengers on the commuting forum, in short, every reasonable-sounding person with whom I have spoken has either grudgingly admitted or outright extolled the virtues of slightly fatter tires for having fewer flats and better (more comfortable) road feel. That doesn't mean mountain bike 26-inchers (unless you just feel compelled to have them, or like the look/feel/attitude), but 700x35c on up to 700x42c is pretty darn good. Some of the low-end Clydes will run 32mm in the world and 28mm on race days only. Tires like those I've mentioned will translate into a better life not only for you, but also less pounding on your rims when you "flawlessly land that killer drop after the epic bunny hop off the kerb, d00d!" That does away with the Marin Mill Valley and both of the Redline models.

Which leaves you with: the GF Cronus and the Kona Dew Deluxe. On a more subjective note, I bought the Dew Deluxe and am thrilled. I did not consider the Gary Fisher bikes, but I did look at a couple with 26" rims and concluded (based on my considerable motorcycling experiences of a few years back) that they might make the handling too squirrely on the road, which is about 95% of my ride, and that there is such thing a tires that are too cushy; it can translate into vagueness and slop when steering/maneuvouering. Also in that more personal vein, I wouldn't have a carbon fork or carbon seat stays. It's a LOT easier to shave weight off off me than off of the bike. Lots cheaper, too! I know carbon is lighter, but I'm sorry, I just don't trust it.

I hope you can get something you like soon, and get riding! Good Luck!
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Old 01-10-07, 11:27 AM   #24
Tom Stormcrowe
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RDRomano
Whoa! there, Killer.
If you'll go back over the thread, I think you'll be able to narrow down these choices pretty rapidly. The consensus (I'm pretty sure) is that given a) the smallish amount of dirt-riding yoou plan on doing, and b) the tremendous (sp?) energy wasted - in terms of pedal stroke - that anything with front suspension is not going to be the best for you. So the Kaitai, Utopia, and the Dew FS (doofus).

Next, I think the consensus of the board is that any rim with <32 spokes will be likely problematic, 32 spoke could go either way (especially depending on the tires) and wheels with >32 spokes should be somewhere in the "plenty 'nuff" to "gross overkill" depending on exact specs and build quality. That knocks out the Marin Lucas Valley and Fairfax with their 28-hole front rims.

Related to that is the tire question. every LBS guy (even the ones who were trying to sell me race bike replicas), every senior forum member here, and many of the messengers on the commuting forum, in short, every reasonable-sounding person with whom I have spoken has either grudgingly admitted or outright extolled the virtues of slightly fatter tires for having fewer flats and better (more comfortable) road feel. That doesn't mean mountain bike 26-inchers (unless you just feel compelled to have them, or like the look/feel/attitude), but 700x35c on up to 700x42c is pretty darn good. Some of the low-end Clydes will run 32mm in the world and 28mm on race days only. Tires like those I've mentioned will translate into a better life not only for you, but also less pounding on your rims when you "flawlessly land that killer drop after the epic bunny hop off the kerb, d00d!" That does away with the Marin Mill Valley and both of the Redline models.

Which leaves you with: the GF Cronus and the Kona Dew Deluxe. On a more subjective note, I bought the Dew Deluxe and am thrilled. I did not consider the Gary Fisher bikes, but I did look at a couple with 26" rims and concluded (based on my considerable motorcycling experiences of a few years back) that they might make the handling too squirrely on the road, which is about 95% of my ride, and that there is such thing a tires that are too cushy; it can translate into vagueness and slop when steering/maneuvouering. Also in that more personal vein, I wouldn't have a carbon fork or carbon seat stays. It's a LOT easier to shave weight off off me than off of the bike. Lots cheaper, too! I know carbon is lighter, but I'm sorry, I just don't trust it.

I hope you can get something you like soon, and get riding! Good Luck!
On another note:

One of the riders in Spinner Saturday has had issues with frame cracks with his Gary Fisher 29er. They've been great with warranty, but..........


If you are going to be riding primarily paved w/ very little dirt, I'd use something like the Surly Long Haul Trucker. The Kona Dew is a great bike as well, especially if you are going to curb hop, etc. Of the choices you've presented here, I'd have to say Kona.
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Old 01-10-07, 12:50 PM   #25
65notch
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Great, thanks RD and Tom...

I think I was partial to the Kona myself actually.

And don't take it the wrong way, I'm not saying I'm looking to "thrash" the thing around, doin' bunny/curb hopping etc...but I live in Metro LA, I plan on doing family riding as well...it's just a fact that it's something that I am going to have to do, obviously I won't when it's not necessary.


Can anyone comment on whether the Kona Dew Deluxe fork will take the 26x1.9's? As the WheelWorld guy said it would.
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