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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

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Old 01-26-07, 11:50 PM   #1
cohophysh
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more thoughts on clydes and carbon forks

Well I have been giving this some thought...I know there have been a few threads on it and I thought I would try to rationalize. I think Hambone had a table with the weight limit on carbon forks...my thought is this. I am not totally sure that even if a carbon fork has a weight limit that a clyde would exceed it...Let me explain. when sitting on a bike most of the riders weight is on the seat vs. the handlebars, when you move out of the seat to stand, perhaps picking up speed or going up hill more weight will be transferred to the handlebars, BUT there is still weight on the pedals. One of my assumptions is that weight may not be evenly distributed on the bike (more on the rear wheel less one the front. If someone had two scales, put one under the front tire and one under the back and had a way to stabilize, this theory could be proven or disproven. Just my opinion...please share your thoughts and does this make sense?
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Old 01-27-07, 12:29 AM   #2
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Under normal riding conditions, I completely agree with you, I doubt any fork would have issues with the heaviest of riders. I'd think the situations of concern would be the abnormal situations, say a tire gets stuck in a rut or something and abnormnal twisting torque is put on the forks. This type of situation would be the more likely situation for failure I'd think.

Not all carbon forks are made the same though, and there are certainly some out there which are made stronger than others. I think if anyone wants one, seek out a suitable one and get it. If you're going to worry about it though, then don't get it. Riding should be fun, not worrysome. Saving .5 pounds on a carbon vs steel fork isn't worth any extra stress in life.
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Old 01-27-07, 08:36 AM   #3
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These are good points I'd never considered . And now it makes total sense why you don't see MTB's with carbon forks - there's no way they'd hold up under those extreme situations. I just found out the stanchions on my suspension fork are actually PLASTIC (go go gadget low-end RST!)! So.. yeah.

Who makes the stronger ones? With this in mind, it re-opens a bunch of bikes that I had previously written off.
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Old 01-27-07, 09:43 AM   #4
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I'd think the situations of concern would be the abnormal situations, say a tire gets stuck in a rut or something and abnormnal twisting torque is put on the forks. This type of situation would be the more likely situation for failure I'd think.
excellent point
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Old 01-27-07, 10:29 AM   #5
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You do get ridgid carbon MTB forks.


These are, like everything Pace, ultalight with a 210lbs rider weight limit, but they are designed for serious off road use and could be used on-road by heavier riders.

In my experience the most shocking things you can do to a fork, apart from riding into an immovable object are to slam into a pothole or ride off a 6" curb onto a steep cambered road.
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