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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

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Old 03-01-07, 08:47 AM   #26
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Originally Posted by chipcom
I just want to add that the fit of your bike and your riding position are important too...as the miles go by those little minor annoyances can turn into major PIAs that sap your will to continue and get you thinking of excuses not to.
Very true dat!

I think chipcom and I disagree on this but I would add, a good pair of cycling shorts, too. I guess if you have a comfy enough seat that may not be necessary I just don't have that seat. (I've never owned a Brooks.)

I would also add, Don't do anything new (other than the distance) that day. If it is an organized ride and they are serving free bottles of High Energy Laxative Water (like it seemed to me they did at the Montauk Century last year) pass on that. (Pun intended.) I hit every porta-potty on the eastern end of Long Island that day.
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Old 03-01-07, 01:32 PM   #27
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Originally Posted by trace22clawson
Wow! I looked at that schedule. It looks pretty tough! 5 rides over 100 miles in 5 consecutive weeks building up to the double century? I think my body would be hammered. Take a look at the suggested training schedule for the one-day riders for the STP (on page 8):

http://cascade.org/EandR/stp/pdf/stp..._book_2007.pdf

That was the schedule I was planning on doing, plus my daily commute of 15 miles 4-5 days a week. What do you think? That first schedule seems to suggest that I need more training.
The first schedule for a century works. I've used it many times. I don't doubt that the Cascade clubs schedule would also works. It tapers more after the century point. I'd use the first schedule to get me to the century and then maybe switch to the Cascade schedule for preparing for the double.
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Old 03-01-07, 02:13 PM   #28
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thanks cyccocommute... that seems like an excellent training schedule for the 204 mile STP. I'v got a double metric planned for May 20 - it should be a good measuring stick for how far along I am in being ready for the double century in mid-July.
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Old 03-01-07, 03:31 PM   #29
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6' 225#

Did STP in one day in 05. Prior to that, had done one century as my longest ride.
Make sure your saddle is comfortable. I rolled on a road bike with 23mm tires, and was fine. Yeah, my butt was sore from being in the saddle all day, but my neck and back pains in my warm-up century were worse. Just get time in the saddle on the bike you'll ride, and you'll do fine.
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Old 03-01-07, 03:43 PM   #30
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I did it, you can do it

I did a one day STP last year, in my first year of road riding. I'm not quite 6' tall, 230lb (215lb by the time I hit STP). I used the one day STP rider training schedule from the Cascade Bicycle Club website and did the one day with no problems - it was fun! It seemed like a lot of the one dayers were older and often bigger guys - we're built for heavy lifting and long hauls.

So yeah, you can do it!
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Old 03-01-07, 05:41 PM   #31
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Originally Posted by (51)
A mere 40, but I am in the 300 lbs+ category.

Well 51, I think that is great! I need a mtn. bike to carry my arss in any comfort. But 40 miles is a good ride for us clydes. Hey that rhymes! Good ride for us clydes! I am going to patent that phrase. You all might just start sending your royalties now.
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Old 03-01-07, 10:42 PM   #32
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I've done centuries back in my youthful clyde days, and now I do 30 milers on the weekend after 4 days of a 15 mile r/t commute. I'm doing the 45 mile distance on the Tour de Cure in May with some friends from work, and next year I'm planning on doing the STP.

There's a guy in the SS/FG forum doing the STP on a fixed gear, so I'm sure you'll have no problems with it. Pace yourself and have fun. I'll see you there next year.
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Old 03-02-07, 12:22 AM   #33
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40 miles sounds like a lot for a 300+ lbs. guy. I'm not sure if I'd be able to go that far at that weight.

But uh, I've also only been able to do about 40 (I don't know exactly how many miles because I'm too cheap to buy a cyclo-computer). I'm 5'8.5" (in bare feet) and weigh in at 216 lbs. That's still technically a Clyde, right?

It's not from lack of trying. My bike is just a low quality gas-pipe thing from the 10-speed '70's bicycle boom that I acquired at a garage sale. It just has so many mechanical problems with it that I can't go much more than 40 at a time before it decides not to like me anymore

I really need a new bike.

Edit: Hey, CliftonGK1, I think I might be seein' ya next year! I plan on doin' the 2008 STP myself, once I get a new bike.
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Old 03-02-07, 01:02 AM   #34
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2008 STP? c'mon guys... you still have time to train for this year's STP! I'm thinkin' I'm gonna need a couple of slow riders in my paceline. The goal is to finish by 10 pm or earlier... that's with a 4:45 am start. I'm hoping that "Team Clyde" will be well represented in the one-day finishers!
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Old 03-02-07, 10:27 AM   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by trace22clawson
2008 STP? c'mon guys... you still have time to train for this year's STP! I'm thinkin' I'm gonna need a couple of slow riders in my paceline. The goal is to finish by 10 pm or earlier... that's with a 4:45 am start. I'm hoping that "Team Clyde" will be well represented in the one-day finishers!
I'd love to do this year's STP, but I don't have a bike right now. Sorry, trace22clawson
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Old 03-02-07, 02:03 PM   #36
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I heartily endorse raising your bars for a long ride. But, do it well before the actual ride so you can get used to the change, and make any other adjustments, possibly to the seat or the levers. I've used a Look Ergo-stem, it's adjustable (got mine off Ebay) so "on the ride" tweeks are possible. Sitting a bit more upright makes the scenery much easier to enjoy, and you tend to look around more which reduces the stress in shoulders and neck. A good trade off for long rides.
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Old 03-02-07, 04:07 PM   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by trace22clawson
Another question? when most of you ride these long distances, do you adjust your bars so that you are more upright? my bars are a few inches below the saddle. This is ok for my commute (15 miles round trip) and even for rides up to 30-40 miles. But much beyond that, I start to feel tightness in my neck and shoulders. I'm just thinking that bein a little more upright might help for a 200 mile ride. Do any of you make this kind of an adjustment for a long ride?
Your Sherpa (assuming that's what you'll ride) should have a fairly high stem already. If not look at it and see if you can turn it over. That will raise it some. My stems are set rather high but then I old and rickety



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Old 03-02-07, 09:28 PM   #38
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I've done several centurys but never any doubles. About 110 is my all time longest. That was/is enough.
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Old 03-02-07, 10:45 PM   #39
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Setting the bars up high is great! I felt like I could go farther on my old bike when I had the bars level with the saddle; when I raised the saddle to make pedaling easier on the legs, I didn't move the handlebar (leaving it at 2" below saddle height as an experiment), and my nads and back started complaining

I never did understand the appeal of low-set bars, except for aerodynamics. But that's what the "drop" portion of bars are for, aren't they? The rest of the time, I prefer to be seated hunched at a 45 degree angle in the hoods.

Grant Peterson may be a retro-grouch, but some of his points are right on, as far as experience has shown this 22-year-old.
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Old 03-02-07, 10:50 PM   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cyccommute
Your Sherpa (assuming that's what you'll ride) should have a fairly high stem already. If not look at it and see if you can turn it over. That will raise it some. My stems are set rather high but then I old and rickety
I'm no gymnast myself!

There's the Sherpa. As you can see the stem could be raised a bit by turning it over. I'm going give it a try. The LBS here said they have all kinds of stems that I can try and when I get the right fit I can buy the right one. Or... i could try an adjustable stem and play around with the angles on it. The LBS didn't have much selection in adjustable stems. I had an accident last fall so it's just one shoulder that starts to give me a bit of trouble after about 45-60 minutes. The position would be fine based on how the other shoulder feels. I'm hoping that raising the stem will take some pressure of the injured shoulder.


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Old 03-02-07, 10:57 PM   #41
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You can also try this:

http://www.deltacycle.com/product.php?g=9

which might set the bars up really high
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Old 03-03-07, 03:54 PM   #42
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did an "unofficial" metric 2 years ago -- three of us got lost on a poorly marked 35-mile charity ride, and boy did that turn out to be a day! the organizers were packed up and gone when we got back! but it was too much fun to raise a fuss -- we did it for the ride, and we got what we paid for. last year, did an official 46.5 miles in a small afternoon w/ a bud -- he had a computer on his ride. oh, yeah -- both of these were on fat tires! full suss! 30+ #'s of bike! looking forward to this summer to do both again in the same year!
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Old 03-03-07, 08:42 PM   #43
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Originally Posted by (51)
A mere 40, but I am in the 300 lbs+ category.
51 and I must be twins! I am good for 40 if I try (I am also over 300 pounds). I am a masher though and am just now learning to pedal at a proper cadence. Can you believe that at 41 years old, I'm learning to ride a bike the right way?

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Old 03-04-07, 10:50 PM   #44
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A couple of years ago my friend and his wife rode STP in one day. He is 6'1" and about 240ish. The best advice they gave me when I thought about doing the "double" is not to spend too much time at the rest stops. Also, make sure you keep those water bottles filled and keep your pockets full of food. You should never reley on the rest stops to keep you hydrated and feed.

Good luck, and have fun!

Oh, my longest day on the bike was 122 mi.
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Old 03-05-07, 10:17 AM   #45
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You people that did the STP in one day... I'd be interested in what kind of bikes, wheels, tires you were riding.
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Old 03-05-07, 01:40 PM   #46
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Quote:
Originally Posted by trace22clawson
I'm planning on doing the Seattle-to-Portland in one day this summer. It's a 204 mile ride. I'm hoping that this is an attainable goal for a clydesdale. I'm sure that there are other under 6' and 200+ lbs riders that have done this. I'm interested in what your training program was, what type of equipment you were on, how far you went, and were you so miserable that you vowed never to do anything like it again?

Interested in your opinions on what the ideal equipment would be for such a ride. Remember, for me, speed is not critical... I just want to finish the ride before it gets dark.
I've never done the STP but as I stated before in the last three years I've done 14 doubles and 2 triples. I'm 6', 230# and 55 years old. I ride a Waterford 2200 with Campy Record triple. My wheels are Campy 32 hole hubs with straight 14 gauge spokes, three cross. I use Conti 4-Seasons 700-25 tires and run them at 95-100 psi.

The most climbing I've done on a double was the Heartbreak Double last year with 16,600'. I did the Grand Tour Highland Triple last year, it had 11,500' of climbing. The triple took me 20 hours on the bike and 22 hours overall. It had 10 rest stops and I averaged 12 minutes per stop. I was a little slow in some of the rest stops with taking off and putting on clothes and one stop being a lunch stop. As mentioned about try not to get hung up in the rest stops, very easy to do as the day goes on and you get tired.

I’ve found that I can’t eat much more than 350 calories per hour, if I do I get full and bloat. You need to stay hydrated, drink at least one large bottle per hour. I use Accelerade in my bottles which gives me 250 calories per hour. For me I need to eat some solid food or I get very hungry. You need to start eating and drinking as soon as you leave the start line, don’t wait. At rest stops I try to eat stuff that I can get down easily, PBJ sandwiches, muffins, pound cake, fresh fruit, etc. I try to keep an even steady pace and try not to accelerate hard out of corners or on hills, you don’t want to burn up in the first 100 miles. If you’re going to experiment with food and drink for the STP start doing it now, don’t wait for the day of the ride to use something new. Good luck with the STP, let us know how you did.
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Old 03-05-07, 01:42 PM   #47
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I've done the STP several times, couple of times in one day; all as a Clydesdale (varying degrees if you get my drift, 6'1", 225-270)). First one-day was on a Trek 700 I think, Phil Wood hub (I was bending everything prior to it). Second time was on a Klein Ultima <?>. As you can see, I'm not much into brands/models. Just looking for something to get me there without much incident. Despite having my bike sized correctly at my LBS, my left hand became very numb and it lasted for several weeks after. Probably due to too much weight on the handle bars and the high school injury where I had broke my humerous bone (the doc warned that I'd feel this when I got older). I made a third one-day attempt, but had not prepared well (didn't get the miles in, was pretty heavy). Anyway, I got to Centrailia/Chehalis (1/2 way point) and threw in the towel. Yup, called my wife as she was driving back down to PDX. I was so ashamed of myself. And I won't let that happen again.

Just get the miles in, get good rest, eat and hydrate. There are several centuries in the area prior to the STP you could use for training. Use pace lines with discretion. One year I got on one that I had no business being on. Sure the first 100 miles were a piece of cake, that second hundred was tough. Good luck.

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Old 03-05-07, 02:05 PM   #48
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+ 1 I use one of those on my 62 cm LHT to make it a "68 cm LHT" ...
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Old 03-05-07, 02:08 PM   #49
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A 56-miler for a ride-my-53rd-birthday ride last July & a 34-miler on the River Bend Classic ride last fall. Both were surprisingly easy considering my average rides are +/- 15 miles.
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Old 03-05-07, 02:17 PM   #50
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So, would getting the miles in be a large factor in having the ability to do it? Like trace22clawson, I'm interested in doing the double century thing in one day as well (but for the 2008 STP, not the upcoming 2007 STP), and I don't exactly have the budget or feel the need for a lightweight, fast-accelerating Trek Madone

Do you think a cyclocross-style bike would be okay, if I use the right tires (like Continental Grand Prix 4-Seasons) and a 48/11 high gear (and a 38/34 granny gear)? It's certainly a higher gear ratio than the 52/12 I see on most road-racing bikes sold at the LBS. I can get up most hills at 36", but of course these are Orange County hills, not Seattle hills
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