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-   Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) (http://www.bikeforums.net/clydesdales-athenas-200-lb-91-kg/)
-   -   which bike for 10km ride? (http://www.bikeforums.net/clydesdales-athenas-200-lb-91-kg/275446-bike-10km-ride.html)

steve2k 03-07-07 09:46 AM

which bike for 10km ride?
 
I posted a question over on the Long Distance Cycling forum but suspect my definition of long distance and theirs is slightly different so felt like a bit of an intruder. However, I know exactly what a clyde is and feel like I'm part of this club (260, 5'8").

I'm doing a 100km ride in 2 months but can't decide on which of the 2 bikes I have to use, so would appreciate some advice.

I have a fairly decent Giant Boulder (mtb) from about 2000 and a bigger green mountain bike that was donated to me, but I don't know what it is. The dilemma is that I think the boulder is too small for me and I've read that a bigger frame is better for longer distances. It seems perfect that I've got the green bike but I'm wondering if it's worth spending time/money bringing it up to scratch.

Here's a summary:
Boulder: newish, seems quite good, 21 gears, front suspension, good brakes, slightly too small (probably ok for off road)
Green one: unknown bike, looks basic, 15 gears, no suspensions, brakes look basic, bigger frame (better for on road)

I don't really want to swap componentry as I have a friend who'll use the boulder if I don't.

So 2 questions:
1) does it make sense to go for a bigger frame bike?
2) is it worth spending money on good components for a rubbish frame? Or should I stick with what I know (i.e. the boulder)?

Any advice welcome.
Cheers,
Steve

Here's a picture of the green one:
http://www.kentestman.com/images/greenbike001.jpg
shifters for the gears:
http://www.kentestman.com/images/greenbike002.jpg
brakes:
http://www.kentestman.com/images/greenbike007.jpg

Tom Stormcrowe 03-07-07 10:48 AM

Simple answer, whichever one is most comfortable for you to ride. Either way, put some slicks on it for road use. Those knobbies will kill you on a metric century, unless it's all going yo be on dirt!

Tom Stormcrowe 03-07-07 10:50 AM

By the way, that green bike looks a lot like a Royce Union from the frame and componentry. I used on as a touring bike and it did OK. Not the greatest, but it did do the job.

geo8rge 03-07-07 11:47 AM

is it worth spending money on good components for a rubbish frame?

If you like the frame keep it, paying a bunch to knock 5 lbs off the frame is not a good investment for anyone over 150 lb. As to parts, Phil Wood hubs for example require less maintenance. Internally geared hubs are also low maintenance. Stainless steel chains reduce rust.

Suspensions on full sized bikes do not accomplish much on paved roads.

superslomo 03-07-07 11:56 AM

I'd say put slicks on the boulder... better the devil you know than the one you don't. Plus, you will (if I gather correctly) have a triple on the giant, and none on the new beast; that extra gearing could come in quite useful if you are on a long ride with some climbing.

Velo Dog 03-07-07 06:34 PM

Your choice, but change the tires. I'd ride the green one with some slicks in the 1.3-1.5 inch range. I would NOT do it on those knobbies.

steve2k 03-08-07 05:00 AM

I took the green bike for a test ride yesterday and it's pretty rough, but seems to work. There's quite a bit of knocking and rattling and things don't seem to turn too smoothly. Still I felt a bit less cramped on it so I think I'm going to see if I can get it fixed up and try it again. At least this way I'll have a spare bike.

I'll try and take the bike to my local shop tomorrow and see if they can let me know what they think of it.

Assuming nothing is broken and needs replacing, what would be the order of components to upgrade?

My guess is:
1) Tyres (I'm thinking of Schwalbe Marathon Kevlar Belt Tyres after reading this forum.)
2) Wheels
3) Handlebars (touring bars or bar ends to give more hand positions)
4) Chainset (do chainsets come with bottom brackets or so I need to buy that seperately? e.g. this chainset. I assume if I go from a 3 ring chainset to a 3 ring chainset then the derailleur will probably be ok.)
5) cassette (I think I need higher + lower gears)
6) chain
7) I've run out of bike bits that I know.

Thanks in advance,
Steve

steve2k 03-08-07 05:04 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by superslomo
Plus, you will (if I gather correctly) have a triple on the giant, and none on the new beast

Both have 3 rings on the front, the giant has 7 on the back and the green one has 5. I'm not sure if I can upgrade from a 5 to a 7 or 8 on the back of the green one, I don't know if there's space, I'll have a look.

The Giant has index shifters which means it 'clicks' from gear to gear, the green one seems more like move the lever until it changes, then fine tune it so it doesn't rub.

steve2k 03-08-07 09:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by steve2k
The Giant has index shifters which means it 'clicks' from gear to gear

um, that didn't come out right, I didn't mean to tell you what it means, I meant to say that's what I think it means. I think an index shifter means it clicks from gear to gear.

centexwoody 03-08-07 09:32 AM

I agree with other posters to ride the frame that is most comfortable. FWIW, I have an 03 Giant MTB steel frame (21" I think) that was too small (I'm 6'4", 220 lbs). I put stem riser on it and jacked up the seatpost, added barends and more handlebar wrap THEN rode it 56 miles. Took me 4 hours but it wasn't a bad ride at all.

Oh, and I had a knobby on back tire and a 'road slick' on the front. The resistance was noticeable about halfway through the long ride. Now I have Specialized Armadillos on both tires & it really rolls pretty well.

Bill Kapaun 03-10-07 05:17 AM

I would be leery of the green bike.
The componants on it are found on the most inexpensive bikes. usually, those bikes have had minimal maintenance and the frames aren't really worth upgrading. You could find a used bike that was more suitable for less money.

Gearing- I doubt you would need lower gears on the Boulder. Doesn't that come with a 14-34 on the back w/ 28-38-48 up front? Something like a 12 or 13-28 might make more sense.
Is the seat high enough on the Boulder? Many people have them set too low. Your heel should just barely reach the pedals with your leg straight.
If you use the Boulder, definitely get a smaller "road" tire. A smaller tire on the rear will basically gear the bike down. Going from a 26x2.0" to a 26x1.5" tire is a 4% change. 1 tooth on a 12T cog is 8%.
Do you have a chance to ride the course ahead of time to get an idea how many/how steep the hills are etc.?

Garandman 03-10-07 05:29 AM

Sell both, get one beter bike that fits and is more durable?

Solid frame MTB's aren't very expensive these days.

steve2k 03-11-07 11:10 AM

I took the bike to the LBS and in the space of about 5 minutes he pointed out a number of things that would need replacing. He said it wasn't worth it because it was a basic frame.
He recommended a ridgeback velocity (a uk manufacturer) for 300 (~$550) which sounds ok. It looks ok to me, felt good on a test ride, I've just never heard of them before.

What's the consensus on these bikes? (http://www.ridgeback.co.uk/index.php...show_bike=TRUE)

Tom Stormcrowe 03-11-07 04:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by steve2k
I took the bike to the LBS and in the space of about 5 minutes he pointed out a number of things that would need replacing. He said it wasn't worth it because it was a basic frame.
He recommended a ridgeback velocity (a uk manufacturer) for 300 (~$550) which sounds ok. It looks ok to me, felt good on a test ride, I've just never heard of them before.

What's the consensus on these bikes? (http://www.ridgeback.co.uk/index.php...show_bike=TRUE)

Looks good, price isn't bad for UK pricing, either!

steve2k 03-12-07 04:22 AM

Thanks Tom,
I don't know much about bikes but from what I can tell it looks ok. I haven't found many reviews online but it's been mentioned in a couple of forums without being slated.

I think I might see if I can take one for an extended test ride.

I contacted a local charity as I'd like to raise some sponsorship money for them and the local newspaper has gotten involved so it looks like I can't chicken out the 100km ride now.

Tom Stormcrowe 03-12-07 06:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by steve2k
Thanks Tom,
I don't know much about bikes but from what I can tell it looks ok. I haven't found many reviews online but it's been mentioned in a couple of forums without being slated.

I think I might see if I can take one for an extended test ride.

I contacted a local charity as I'd like to raise some sponsorship money for them and the local newspaper has gotten involved so it looks like I can't chicken out the 100km ride now.

Good for you! That's the way to do it! Make it so it's humiliating if you back out! If you try, and can't make it, so be it! It's far better to try than it is to always wonder if you could have.;) I do have the utmost confidence that you can do it, though.:D


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