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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

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Old 03-09-07, 03:00 AM   #1
steve2k
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upgrade components in which order?

Assuming that everything currently works, albeit roughly, what would be the order of components to upgrade on a mountain bike to be used for mainly road riding?

My guess is:
1) Tyres
2) Wheels
3) Handlebars (touring bars or bar ends to give more hand positions)
4) Chainset
5) cassette
6) chain
7) Saddle
8) Brakes
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Old 03-09-07, 07:41 AM   #2
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Don't think you would need a new chain, new wheels, a new saddle or new brakes... MTBs usually have pretty powerful braking, why do any swapping of that?

Tires definitely will make a difference, and a set of bars with more positions would be helpful. A narrower range "road" cassette would probably make it easier to get a happy cadence all over the board (plus mountain cassettes have a low gear that are mostly not useful on the road.)

If you like the saddle you have now, don't switch that either... it takes most folks hundreds of dollars and a world of painful rides to figure out what works and what doesn't. Why do you feel like switching that out??
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Old 03-09-07, 08:11 AM   #3
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In this order

Saddle (until you find one that is comfortable)
Tires
Handlebars
Pedals/shoes
Cassette
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Old 03-09-07, 08:28 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by steve2k
Assuming that everything currently works, albeit roughly, what would be the order of components to upgrade on a mountain bike to be used for mainly road riding?

My guess is:
1) Tyres
2) Wheels
3) Handlebars (touring bars or bar ends to give more hand positions)
4) Chainset
5) cassette
6) chain
7) Saddle
8) Brakes
About the only thing you need to change would be the tires and maybe the wheels (Personally, I run knobbies on a mountain bike everywhere because I like to go bounding off into the woods at random times ). Add bar ends to give you more hand positions.

Anything else and you might want to look into getting a 'real' road bike. Building a road bike from a mountain bike a part at a time can become a rather costly proposition without a lot of benefit. There are lots of inexpensive really good road bikes here in the States. If you look around and compare, you'll probably find some across the pond.
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Old 03-09-07, 10:25 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cyccommute
About the only thing you need to change would be the tires and maybe the wheels (Personally, I run knobbies on a mountain bike everywhere because I like to go bounding off into the woods at random times ). Add bar ends to give you more hand positions.

Anything else and you might want to look into getting a 'real' road bike. Building a road bike from a mountain bike a part at a time can become a rather costly proposition without a lot of benefit. There are lots of inexpensive really good road bikes here in the States. If you look around and compare, you'll probably find some across the pond.
And I am in 100% agreement here. An alternative to bar ends also might be a trekking bar.....even more hand positions and your MTB Brake levers and shifters should transition right to the trekking bars with no issues.
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