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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

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Old 03-21-07, 10:03 AM   #1
fmady
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315 lbs 100 Miles?

HELP!! I am 6' 315 pounds and have set a goal of riding in the "ride to cure diabetes" 100 miles in Montana summer 08'. ( I have a 10 year old daughter with type 1 diabetes) I have no clue about training for this event. It has been 3 weeks since I bought my bike, found some real comfortable bibs and wide shoes. I am now ready to ride. I have very little experience in riding. I purchased a Novara Randonee from REI. They were very helpful and encouraging. I am looking for some kind of structured training program that takes into consideration that a 5 mile flat ride is my starting point. I do not want to get discouraged since my motivation at this point is very high. The best part is that when asking for donations at my current weight people are very willing to pony up. Maybe they think "no way will he ever make 100 Miles". Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Fred
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Old 03-21-07, 10:33 AM   #2
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Originally Posted by fmady
HELP!! I am 6' 315 pounds and have set a goal of riding in the "ride to cure diabetes" 100 miles in Montana summer 08'. ( I have a 10 year old daughter with type 1 diabetes) I have no clue about training for this event. It has been 3 weeks since I bought my bike, found some real comfortable bibs and wide shoes. I am now ready to ride. I have very little experience in riding. I purchased a Novara Randonee from REI. They were very helpful and encouraging. I am looking for some kind of structured training program that takes into consideration that a 5 mile flat ride is my starting point. I do not want to get discouraged since my motivation at this point is very high. The best part is that when asking for donations at my current weight people are very willing to pony up. Maybe they think "no way will he ever make 100 Miles". Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Fred
Fred, you can do the ride by the end of Summer if you want! It's doable, fairly easily, actually! Best advice I can give is just build your aerobic base and have a ball doing it! Look at the Spinner Miles thread up in the stickies at the top of the forum and see how everybody's miles went up from start to current.
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Old 03-21-07, 11:02 AM   #3
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I agree with Tom that it is very doable, and not real hard if you build up your base.
This link from the Cascade Bicycle club shows a suggested training schedule for the Seattle to Portland ride. It has a chart to prepare for either a 1 or 2 day ride. I used it a couple years ago, and found it very helpful.
http://www.cascade.org/EandR/stp/stp_mileage.cfm
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Old 03-21-07, 11:21 AM   #4
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The chart at the bottom of that page is AWESOME. One thing to keep in mind, is to shy away from any serious hills or climbing until you have a few hundred miles under you. The last thing we want is injuries


And TomS is right, you have plenty of time to do a century this year, heck, by May if you really wanted to
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Old 03-21-07, 11:23 AM   #5
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Fred, you will be flat amazed as to how fast your capabilities grow. If you need any encouragement or advice, we're only a few clicks away, Brah!
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Old 03-21-07, 12:13 PM   #6
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I was around your size and hadn't been doing serious riding in many years. (6'1" 330#, 46" waist)

Last February a buddy told me we were doing the Montauk Century that year. I told him ok. Then realised what I had just done. So, once the snow cleared in March I started training. The first week I rode to work on Monday then home on Tuesday, off on Wed., in on Thurs back on Fri. THe next week I did the same and added a longer ride on Sat. The next week I added a round trip on Wed. Then I just started riding round trip every day. (I ride the 14 miles in less time than mass transit can get me there.)

Other way to do it is an hour a day... Then add longer and longer trips on the weekends. The more you ride the faster you'll go so don't just do it by route or you won't increase endurance. Do it by time in saddle.

And mix up the pace. Some days do circuits/sprints/etc. There are a dozen names for them. Basically, sprint as fast as you can, recover, repeat, repeat, repeat.

Don't forget hills. Training on hills is important. If your route has some big/steep hills especially, train them. Hills are the hardest part of riding for us big guys. The weight to power ratio just kills us in the mountains. (If you get to the top and you still have some energy, turn around, go back down and do it again. Repeat.)

If you google century+training you'll find some good free tools.

Good luck. Come back if you have more questions.
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Old 03-21-07, 04:25 PM   #7
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I training for one now and I should have no issues doing it. This is the training guide I am using and you can do your ride in 10 weeks. http://www.diablocyclists.com/RiderT...ingProgram.htm. I'm 300 +/- a lbs or 2 and will doing it on a hybrid.
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Old 03-21-07, 06:44 PM   #8
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Just get out and ride. Put as many miles behind you as possible.
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Old 03-21-07, 08:50 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fmady
HELP!! I am 6' 315 pounds and have set a goal of riding in the "ride to cure diabetes" 100 miles in Montana summer 08'. ( I have a 10 year old daughter with type 1 diabetes) I have no clue about training for this event. It has been 3 weeks since I bought my bike, found some real comfortable bibs and wide shoes. I am now ready to ride. I have very little experience in riding. I purchased a Novara Randonee from REI. They were very helpful and encouraging. I am looking for some kind of structured training program that takes into consideration that a 5 mile flat ride is my starting point. I do not want to get discouraged since my motivation at this point is very high. The best part is that when asking for donations at my current weight people are very willing to pony up. Maybe they think "no way will he ever make 100 Miles". Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Fred
Absofrickenlutely you can do a century at 315. Last year, at 5'10" 290+, I rode two--an out and back ride up Rt 7 to MA, and the Hat City Cyclefest. The latter was brutally tough, with all the hills, but yes, it is doable.

To do a century, you need to put miles in- the more the better. If you build to riding ove 100 miles/wk, with at least one 50 mile ride, you'll be ready to do a century.
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Old 03-21-07, 09:22 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fmady
HELP!! I am 6' 315 pounds and have set a goal of riding in the "ride to cure diabetes" 100 miles in Montana summer 08'. ( I have a 10 year old daughter with type 1 diabetes) I have no clue about training for this event. It has been 3 weeks since I bought my bike, found some real comfortable bibs and wide shoes. I am now ready to ride. I have very little experience in riding. I purchased a Novara Randonee from REI. They were very helpful and encouraging. I am looking for some kind of structured training program that takes into consideration that a 5 mile flat ride is my starting point. I do not want to get discouraged since my motivation at this point is very high. The best part is that when asking for donations at my current weight people are very willing to pony up. Maybe they think "no way will he ever make 100 Miles". Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Fred
Any training program you find, can be modified, there is an old Chinese proverb, "A 1000 mile journey starts with the first step". Training programs that you find in books or online intended for a 145lb guy on a $5,000 road bike, who already rides 10,000 miles a year and rides all year round, is going to be very different from a training program for a 240lb guy on a converted MTB, who has done maybe 500 miles in the last year, and just took 5 months off. It is going to be different again for a 315lb guy who is just starting out, on a touring bike, who either hasn't been on a bike in years, or hasn't been on a bike period.

Here is what you do, before starting any training program, talk to your doctor, get a complete checkup, to make sure there is no problem that could complicate the training . Now get a cheap bike computer, you need this so that you can track the distance that your riding. You can also track time, but then you start wanting to know speed, and speed is not important at this point.

So, start with one mile, better yet, start metric 1km, kilometers are shorter, and distances look more impressive, and that is encouraging. So, go 1km, see how it feels, then wait a couple of days and do it again, then try 2 kilometres, a couple of weeks later. There are a few ways to add distance, base your distance on a period like a week, so maybe the first week you go 2 km - Wednesday, Saturday, the next week you go 4km, the next week you go 6km, the idea is that determine an amount of increase, say 10% per week, with each ride rounded up to the next nearest 1km. Time constraints usually make weekday distances harder, but nothing says each ride needs to be the same length, so maybe do 10km on Saturday, and 5km each day on Tuesday and Thursday.... You keep adding distance, with one long ride, and several shorter ones.

There are a couple of ways to track your distance, for example I have an open office Spreadsheet, PM me if you would like a copy. You can also log your distance using the Spinner Saturday thread on here. Or do both, there is a reason that Saturdays are highlighted on my chart , and as soon as the riding season starts I hope to give Tom some numbers, I hope he has room on his chart
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Old 03-22-07, 07:24 AM   #11
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I started by doing one five mile loop around a park. This eventually became two loops, and then, three. These flat park rides went on for months before I tried a few hills. It takes time for your body to adapt to riding. One thing I kept in mind was spinning, rather than mashing big gears. I was concerned about the longevity of my knees, so I taught myself to use low gears and spin. I have since done many centuries, including one last year with 12,000 feet of climbing. You can do it!
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Old 03-22-07, 07:43 AM   #12
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Wogster, I'll make room on the chart!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wogsterca
Any training program you find, can be modified, there is an old Chinese proverb, "A 1000 mile journey starts with the first step". Training programs that you find in books or online intended for a 145lb guy on a $5,000 road bike, who already rides 10,000 miles a year and rides all year round, is going to be very different from a training program for a 240lb guy on a converted MTB, who has done maybe 500 miles in the last year, and just took 5 months off. It is going to be different again for a 315lb guy who is just starting out, on a touring bike, who either hasn't been on a bike in years, or hasn't been on a bike period.

Here is what you do, before starting any training program, talk to your doctor, get a complete checkup, to make sure there is no problem that could complicate the training . Now get a cheap bike computer, you need this so that you can track the distance that your riding. You can also track time, but then you start wanting to know speed, and speed is not important at this point.

So, start with one mile, better yet, start metric 1km, kilometers are shorter, and distances look more impressive, and that is encouraging. So, go 1km, see how it feels, then wait a couple of days and do it again, then try 2 kilometres, a couple of weeks later. There are a few ways to add distance, base your distance on a period like a week, so maybe the first week you go 2 km - Wednesday, Saturday, the next week you go 4km, the next week you go 6km, the idea is that determine an amount of increase, say 10% per week, with each ride rounded up to the next nearest 1km. Time constraints usually make weekday distances harder, but nothing says each ride needs to be the same length, so maybe do 10km on Saturday, and 5km each day on Tuesday and Thursday.... You keep adding distance, with one long ride, and several shorter ones.

There are a couple of ways to track your distance, for example I have an open office Spreadsheet, PM me if you would like a copy. You can also log your distance using the Spinner Saturday thread on here. Or do both, there is a reason that Saturdays are highlighted on my chart , and as soon as the riding season starts I hope to give Tom some numbers, I hope he has room on his chart
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Old 03-22-07, 10:00 AM   #13
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Thanks

I really appreciate the insite. I thought this was going to be nearly impossible. After reading some of your replys i just want to get out and ride,ride,ride. I'll keep you in the loop.
Thanks again

Fred
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Old 03-22-07, 06:37 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Stormcrowe
Wogster, I'll make room on the chart!
Well, first I need to get a bike computer, and some new tires, distance on an MTB is one thing, distance on an MTB with knobby tires is tougher then it should be . Thinking a set of Tioga City Slickers, 35mm wide, run them at around 85psi, should give better performance then the 52mm wide knobbies at 60psi .
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Old 03-22-07, 08:37 PM   #15
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I agree with the others. You can do it if you keep riding 4 or 5 times a week. I started out riding 6 miles at a time. The first summer I did a metric century and I did a full century the next year. Plus, if you keep riding that much, I don't think you'll be at 315 much longer! (I dropped from 340 to 300 by the time I did my first century over the two seasons.)
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Old 03-22-07, 10:53 PM   #16
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Well, I can't offer much help in the way of a structured training program (my mind just doesn't work that way), and I haven't done a century yet, but I can offer my own experience as some advice. I'm just a shade (like, ¼ inch) under six feet, and when I started riding last June I was about 265 pounds. (I can't say exactly - I didn't exactly much feel like weighting myself back then.) I had, for the last several years, always started to do some kind of exersize for a few weeks every summer, but I never kept it up. So, one day I went to my LBS and bought a bike rack for my car, took my bike to my shop and pumped up the tires, and started taking my bike to a local lake for a daily ride. I told people, "it's time to start giving up on my summer exersize plan - but before I can give it up, I need to start it."

I set no goals for myself (like I said, my mind doesn't work well with that kind of pressure), and I kept my attitude about it very light. The only thing is, this time I DIDN'T give up. I kept doing it. One time around the lake became two, then three, then I started riding TO the lake before doing my laps, and by last November I was doing a 30 mile ride at least twice a week, and 20-25 four days. The day before Thanksgiving I bought my new bike (my Long Haul Trucker - I love my bike!), and with just a few exceptions, I started to ride to work every day straight through the winter (not quite as impressive as it sounds - my shop is about eight minutes away by bike - but it kept me riding), and I would run grocery runs 1-3 times a week for about ten miles each time.

I also started to do some core body workouts this winter, though I didn't really get serious about them until about a month ago (three times a week). I lost some of my endurence over the winter (I rode about 28 miles on a really nice day last week, but I had to take a few days off afterwards cause my legs and knees were bordering on an injury), but I gained a good 2 miles an hour riding through the winter, and today I did my first real "fittness" ride of the year (the one last week was an errand) of about 18 miles, and I feel great. By the middle of next month I'll be back to my November schedule, and by the end of next month I'll have started doing some short bike/camping tours. By the end of June I hope to do a century (though I'm not gonna sweet it, as I don't have any pressing need to do so, I would just like to do it), and in August I'm taking my bike out to California to do some touring of the wine country around the dates of a guitar builders festival where my shop is presenting. That will likely have at least one or two centuries involved with it. Right now I'm at about 205 pounds (down 60 or so, and yes, I've started weighting myself), and I feel better than I can recall feeling about my body (I weight less than I have since high school, but of course no one likes their body in high school).

So, while I know you have a concrete goal in mind, my one piece of advice is to keep your attitude about it light, keep it fun, and what every you do, don't stress out about it.



Gabriel
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Old 03-23-07, 03:33 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fmady
After reading some of your replys i just want to get out and ride,ride,ride.
Don't forget to come back often for a top up on that enthusiasm. This forum is one of the reasons I keep getting on the bike instead of getting in the car.
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Old 03-23-07, 05:55 AM   #18
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You can do it. I started at 317 and 6'1". Within a year I had done a century and within two, did the formidable RAIN ride (www.rainride.org).

It's all about being persistent and putting in the miles.
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Old 03-23-07, 12:35 PM   #19
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I didn't read every post on here, so I don't know if this link has been posted or not, but here is a 10 week plan to get you ready for a century:

http://www.c-r-a-n-e.com/training.html

I am using it right now to train for my first century in May (I weigh 280 right now). Also, bear in mind that you won't be riding 100 miles at 315. You'll be amazed at how fast the weight goes away. A 315 pound man riding 10mph burns 11.2 calories per minute. At 15 mph it rises to 17.7. If you bike for an hour at 15mph you have burned off more than 1,000 calories. Like I said, it melts off quickly.

BTW, best of luck to your daughter.
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Old 03-23-07, 01:28 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dpb13
I didn't read every post on here, so I don't know if this link has been posted or not, but here is a 10 week plan to get you ready for a century:

http://www.c-r-a-n-e.com/training.html

I am using it right now to train for my first century in May (I weigh 280 right now). Also, bear in mind that you won't be riding 100 miles at 315. You'll be amazed at how fast the weight goes away. A 315 pound man riding 10mph burns 11.2 calories per minute. At 15 mph it rises to 17.7. If you bike for an hour at 15mph you have burned off more than 1,000 calories. Like I said, it melts off quickly.

BTW, best of luck to your daughter.
turn that around... three slices of pepperoni requires almost an hour of riding. Without stop!

(What calculator did you use?)
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Old 03-23-07, 02:03 PM   #21
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I used numbers that I have seen in a number of places, including here:

http://www.nationalmssociety.org/mam...ail.asp?e=8825

Go down to the bottom of the page ("Burning Calories").
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Old 03-23-07, 02:57 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dpb13
I used numbers that I have seen in a number of places, including here:

http://www.nationalmssociety.org/mam...ail.asp?e=8825

Go down to the bottom of the page ("Burning Calories").
I threw the data into a spreadsheet (Interactive) if anyone wants it. Just email me or PM me with an email address and I'll send it to you. It was created with Open Office, but is set up in Excel Format.

enter your weight in the appropriate column and it will convert the data to a calories/hr for you.

EDIT: I started the data run for April, by the way.
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Old 03-25-07, 11:00 PM   #23
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Ride a little bit every day rather than wait until you find the time to put in the miles. Energy begets energy and when you pedal your bike consistantly even if it is 10 times around the block you will be ready for the long rides you dream about. See if there is a spinner class in your local gym or Y and use that when it rains. Consistancy and you will do it without killing your self. Good luck.
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