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  1. #1
    Mountain Man on a MTB Chris in WCVA's Avatar
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    Okay, did I mess up?

    I just ordered a bike from Amazon. New 2005 Mongoose Pro Tyax Comp alloy frame MTB. Hardtail w/ suspension fork. 2006 model specs. I wanted something strong, relatively light, and good quality. This bike looked good and is 42% off still in the box.

    It's a 20" frame, which seems plenty big for me at 6'3". Its a bit taller than the Clunk.

    Whaddaya think? Did I do Okay? If I screwed up, let me know because I could still cancel it. But I think I got what I needed in it.
    DON'T PANIC

    2006 KHS Alite 300

    Adjustable Shocks Rock!

  2. #2
    Senior Member PeterM's Avatar
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    i'd always want to ride a bike before buying it (or at least go down to the lbs to check out the model itself). some bikes feel right. some don't. gotta look at your inseam too, not just your height. others may hopefully be able to offer more concrete advice....these are just the ramblings of someone waiting in the lab for the experiment to finish so they can go home and sleep.

  3. #3
    Trans-Urban Velocommando ax0n's Avatar
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    I'd usually stay away from Mongoose but it looks like it's one of their higher end bikes. I checked out the components and it appears to be made of okay pieces. As long as it's assembled properly, it should last a while, I'd imagine. Keep an eye on the bottom bracket (crank bearings/cartridge) and the wheel hub bearings. With us big guys, those seem to be among the first things to fail.

    I would have recommended staying away from a front suspension as well. When a teenage boy weighing in at a buck-ten hops on, the front suspension will work pretty well. It will remain pretty firm unless they're really hammering on it or bouncing around on rough terrain. When a clyde hops on, the front suspension instantly loads. As we pedal, the front starts bouncing up and down, decreasing the efficiency of the pedal stroke and making it harder to get up to speed. Now, a bonus is that it offers more of a work-out than a rigid-fork bike would however, the front suspension might blow out. I have a 9-year-old Diamondback Sorrento mountain bike with a front suspension that I picked up about 6 months ago used, and the fork hasn't given out on me yet, but you can really tell the difference between that at my Diamondback Outlook, which is a hybrid with no suspension.

    Best of luck! Make sure she's put together well, and enjoy your new set o' wheels! If the bike came with torque specs for the fasteners, I'd recommend spending the $20-$30 at the auto parts store to get a micrometer-style torque wrench. For longevity and qualirty, proper torque is one of the essential things to get right when assembling a bike. I'd argue that plenty of "department store" bikes would last longer if an experienced bike mechanic put it together.
    ax0n: Geeky and bikey
    My latest tip: Carrying your laptop
    My latest geeky project: Ethernet-testing cuff links

  4. #4
    Mountain Man on a MTB Chris in WCVA's Avatar
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    Thanks for the advice. I look into that wrench. I didn't have to much of a problem on my wife's Schwinn with front suspension. Considering the value of the bike (I can justify putting parts on it) if its too much of a problem, I'll buy a good stiff fork and sell the OE one on ebay.

    I wouldn't have bought a Mongoose if it wasn't a high end model.
    DON'T PANIC

    2006 KHS Alite 300

    Adjustable Shocks Rock!

  5. #5
    Trans-Urban Velocommando ax0n's Avatar
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    I honestly had never seen that model before, but I saw Mongoose and I kind of puckered until I checked the specs out on it. When I got into cycling last year (after a 10 year hiatus and nearly 80 pounds of weight gain) I was ill-informed and was looking at different bikes under the $150 price-point. I ended up looking at Mongooses, Nexts, Huffies and low-end Schwinns at the local discount warehouse stores. I broke my Next (disintegrated rear hub, trashed bottom bracket, blown out rear suspension) in six weeks.

    My '98 Outlook has pretty cheap components on it. It's nothing like the new Outlook (if you check out the '07 models) and if you compare it to the bike I destroyed, it really isn't much different. I have some upgrades on it now, but the bike set me back $80 on Craigslist, so I had a bit of cash to spare when bulletproofing it. It was 9 years old but hadn't been ridden but perhaps a mile in all those years. The difference is that someone put it together carefully, Then I spent a little bit replacing the cheapo bearings in the OEM BB cartridge with some decent ones, and putting a quick-release "freehub" style wheel and a good cassette on it. It runs like a champ.

    My x-mart bike was thrown together, probably by some stoned 17-year-old warehouse monkey. I had to adjust the heck out of it. The seatstay and dropouts were slightly bent, and the brakes weren't even close to being adjusted properly. The derailleurs were in need of a tune-up which I performed myself. I don't see the Mongoose giving you too many problems, just take your time putting it together. Assembling a bike yourself, then using it to transport yourself under your own power, it's a very zen-like experience.
    ax0n: Geeky and bikey
    My latest tip: Carrying your laptop
    My latest geeky project: Ethernet-testing cuff links

  6. #6
    Mountain Man on a MTB Chris in WCVA's Avatar
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    I've notice that Pacif cycles have two classes of bicycles. You don't find the big box models on their websites. I wonder why. I'm really afraid I'm about to rip the handelbars off the clunk (The ULTIMATE Cheap big box bike). I don't actually trail ride right now, compaired to you I'm probably a casual rider (A mile or less on a typical ride, dirt paths and streets), so I'm not worried as much about harsh bumps, I just need something tough enough to stand up to daily riding. If I get a couple good years out of it, I'll be satisfied. I'll also have time to decide exactly what I need for my style once I'm in shape. I don't think the assembly will be too much, it should have the crank and gears installed. I'm a better bike mechanic than I am a cyclist, but if its much more than basic assembly, I'll seek help.
    DON'T PANIC

    2006 KHS Alite 300

    Adjustable Shocks Rock!

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