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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

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Old 03-31-07, 12:49 PM   #1
Vespa
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Cadence and the Clyde

Hi, got my new Surly Cross Check and a new computer that measures cadence and have been out for a few rides getting accustomed to the bike. My cadence at first was way lower than I had imagined.

I am targeting 80 RPM to start and am averaging in the low 70s while averaging 16 - 17 mph or 26 -27 kph I am wondering if any of you more experienced Clydes have some input on what works for you.

Thanks
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Old 03-31-07, 01:02 PM   #2
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When I first starting riding again (road bike), my average cadence was ~80 rpm for the same speed. But with additional experience and careful gear selection, my average cadence rose to ~90 rpm without feeling like I was bouncing on my saddle.

So, give it time and drop down one gear and if it feels comfortable.
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Old 03-31-07, 01:03 PM   #3
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lower gears= higher cadence I also use rollers to smooth out my spin and increase my cadence
I run 42x16 on my fixed commuter and spin about 80-100 all day long 69gi will do that to ya

good luck hope this helps
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Old 03-31-07, 07:01 PM   #4
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I started in the 75 area and have worked up to 85+ on average. I did not get the cadence sensor with my Garmin, but I did have one on my Polar and got to know where my cadence was pretty quickly by my gear selection. Once you have it for a while, you'll get a feel for your cadence with out looking at computer.
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Old 03-31-07, 07:13 PM   #5
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I've been taking an aerobic fitness class 2x a week since first part of January on a Computrainer multi rider setup, so we do a lot of cadence drills, from 70 rpm hard load sessions up to 110+ rpm. I've always been a high spinner, 95+, but these classes have taught me to vary it during a ride. Low cadence taxes the leg muscles more, while high cadence taxes the cardio system, so by varying it you can give different parts a rest. I also find that high cadence (100-105 rpm) works best for pull sessions in pace lines, as your speed tends to stay very steady and you can motor over slight changes in terrain without loosing speed. Then when I drop back to the back of the line, I shift down to harder gears to catch my breath.
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Old 03-31-07, 08:57 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vespa
Hi, got my new Surly Cross Check and a new computer that measures cadence and have been out for a few rides getting accustomed to the bike. My cadence at first was way lower than I had imagined.

I am targeting 80 RPM to start and am averaging in the low 70s while averaging 16 - 17 mph or 26 -27 kph I am wondering if any of you more experienced Clydes have some input on what works for you.

Thanks
If your not using toe clips or clipless pedals, either of those technologies may help get your spin rate up.
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Old 04-01-07, 12:13 AM   #7
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Jeepers when I started I was only keeping my cadence around the mid 60's ......... on a good day
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Old 04-01-07, 03:15 PM   #8
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Somewhere around 80-85rpm is a good baseline for most people. IN general, I would say try to keep your gears down and your revs up. Not to extremes, though - what I mean is that, if in doubt or you feel like the "perfect" gear is in between two, choose the lower one, at least until you get a feel for what is ideal for you.

Two good reasons for this: (1) you'll flush more lactic acid out of your legs, which means less soreness; and (2) it's easier on the knees. Cycling is a knee-friendly sport if your bike is set up right and you ride smart. The two most common ways to make you bike knee-unfriendly is to keep your seat too low and to habitually push gears that are too big. Us big folk need to be especially conscious of these factors.
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Old 04-01-07, 09:28 PM   #9
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Thanks for all the feedback!

I pushed up to high 70's today. It feels very different spinning my surly than pushing the old hybrid- the cardio work out is noticeably better and I have no soreness after rides. Its different enough I am working back up to my usual 60km slowly.
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Old 04-02-07, 04:39 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vespa
Hi, got my new Surly Cross Check and a new computer that measures cadence and have been out for a few rides getting accustomed to the bike. My cadence at first was way lower than I had imagined.

I am targeting 80 RPM to start and am averaging in the low 70s while averaging 16 - 17 mph or 26 -27 kph I am wondering if any of you more experienced Clydes have some input on what works for you.

Thanks
I am also learning about cadence and spinning. When I got the computer last month, I found that I was "mashing" in the top gear (42-11 on my bike) at 55-60 cadence. Now I am mindful of my peddling and I try to stay right at 80rpm. Before I got the computer, if you said that I can go just as fast and go much longer by spinning faster in a lower gear, I would not have believed you! I am now a believer.

At 80rpm, I am right around 17mph in the 32-12 ring/cog selection. I hear that my rpm's will get faster eventually (I dont think my legs could go any faster, but I have been wrong before ) so I will keep it at 80 for now.

Good luck

Matty in Brooklyn
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Old 04-02-07, 04:47 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mattyknacks
I am also learning about cadence and spinning. When I got the computer last month, I found that I was "mashing" in the top gear (42-11 on my bike) at 55-60 cadence. Now I am mindful of my peddling and I try to stay right at 80rpm. Before I got the computer, if you said that I can go just as fast and go much longer by spinning faster in a lower gear, I would not have believed you! I am now a believer.

At 80rpm, I am right around 17mph in the 32-12 ring/cog selection. I hear that my rpm's will get faster eventually (I dont think my legs could go any faster, but I have been wrong before ) so I will keep it at 80 for now.

Good luck

Matty in Brooklyn
Wait til you do a 120 BPM cadence in a sprint without bouncing in the saddle!
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Old 04-02-07, 05:20 AM   #12
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Try riding a single that is way undergeared to keep up with your mates - I did that for a while with 42/18 gearing - great way to build up cadence :-)

Now it is 42/16 and I can keep with them nicely!
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Old 04-02-07, 06:01 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vespa
Hi, got my new Surly Cross Check and a new computer that measures cadence and have been out for a few rides getting accustomed to the bike. My cadence at first was way lower than I had imagined.
That is exactly the way I felt at first when I got my Cateye computer w/cadence. I thought my cadence would be around 90 while pedaling, but it ended up only being around 76-78 (while pedaling; not computer average -- computer average is always lower). At first it felt unnatural for me to pedal at 90 rpm. But after a few weeks of working at pedaling 90 rpm, I found it to be rather easy. Then 100 rpm seemed hard. Now I can do 98-100 rpm comfortably, if I choose to. But I prefer to stay around 90 cadence for most of the time. I only go to 100 if I am sprinting/picking up the pace for some reason.

So just keep working at increasing your cadence, and it will come.
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