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-   -   Best 26" wheel for uber-clyde. (http://www.bikeforums.net/clydesdales-athenas-200-lb-91-kg/285455-best-26-wheel-uber-clyde.html)

moose67 04-06-07 07:58 PM

Best 26" wheel for uber-clyde.
 
What is the most inexpensive 26" wheel that would support an uber-clyde. My dad bought a bike last year that I would like to alternate riding with my custom built recumbent. It's not an expensive bike and I know from reading the posts hear it may not hold up but the biggest thing for me is the wheels and tires. I need something that will support my weight. Any help is greatly appreciated.

Tom Stormcrowe 04-06-07 08:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by moose67
What is the most inexpensive 26" wheel that would support an uber-clyde. My dad bought a bike last year that I would like to alternate riding with my custom built recumbent. It's not an expensive bike and I know from reading the posts hear it may not hold up but the biggest thing for me is the wheels and tires. I need something that will support my weight. Any help is greatly appreciated.

What is your actual weight?

I rode a stock set of Alex mountainbike wheels at 450 pounds on a Royce Union, 40 spoke rear and 36 spoke front and they held up for pavement riding.

(51) 04-07-07 04:12 AM

I'm Uber and I have put 5,000 miles on my Trek's stock wheels (Matrix 750). I popped a spoke at 2,000 miles. Since then they have been hand built with DT spokes, and I have not had a problem.

phinney 04-07-07 06:00 AM

I built up a bike last winter and wanted the most durable wheel for the money. The reviews I read pointed to Sun Rhyno Lites on Deore LX hubs. They were very inexpensive and so far no problems but way to early to tell.

moose67 04-07-07 07:41 AM

My weight is over 450 Tom. My current setup is here http://quadrecumbent.blogspot.com . I have used two 20" boys BMX bikes with suspension front and rear. Not having the funds starting out I went with something that I was sure would hold my weight therefore the quad setup. Don't get me wrong I love this bike. I get looks all the time like "what is that?" I think that's cool. I want to do more to my bike but I know that will take it off the road for a little while. I don't won't to stop riding so that's why I'd like to use my dad's bike. It's a walmart bike that is put together fairly well. The wheels was my main concern. The wheels and the tires.

Tom Stormcrowe 04-07-07 08:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by moose67
My weight is over 450 Tom. My current setup is here http://quadrecumbent.blogspot.com . I have used two 20" boys BMX bikes with suspension front and rear. Not having the funds starting out I went with something that I was sure would hold my weight therefore the quad setup. Don't get me wrong I love this bike. I get looks all the time like "what is that?" I think that's cool. I want to do more to my bike but I know that will take it off the road for a little while. I don't won't to stop riding so that's why I'd like to use my dad's bike. It's a walmart bike that is put together fairly well. The wheels was my main concern. The wheels and the tires.

I honestly think the bigges issue you will have is seatpost problems and comfort, and that's about it.

A good 26" Tire for an Uberclyde, for example, is the Geax Evolution. Low rolling resistance, tough as nails and can mix the terrain a bit, good for pavement, Packed dirt, gravel, etc and Kevlar cored for puncture resistance. I've used them touring on a converted mountainbike and they did well, even with a Clyde and 40 pounds of gear on the bike in panniers and racks. The bike is still around, it's a cheap Royce Union, and I use it for bad weather riding now. Just ride it "light", no curb hopping and treat it with respect, and I really think you won't have a lot of issues. If you want, PM me your actual weight and I'll be able to say more in this with some confidence. I have some resources also I may be able to pass along as far as information.

By the way, I got a look at your Quad, it's an interesting piece of equipment! Looks like it's stressed for a 2000 pound load! Fairly well engineered!~:D I especially like the transfer shaft from the Boom chain to the rear drive chain being incorporated into structural support, great dual purposing!:D

I'd think about some 20X1.5 or 20X1.75 slicks on it though to reduce rolling resistance though.

FarHorizon 04-07-07 09:53 AM

At my current 280#, I've had no problem with stock 32-spoke wheels on my Specialized mountain bike. I've also had no problem with 700c wheels with 32-spokes on my road bike.

When I was 255#, I rode Campagnolo Vento wheels on my road bike for a brief time (about three months) with only one broken rear spoke which did NOT damage the wheel when it broke.

Modern wheels (particularly the ones with V-profile rims) are much tougher, in my opinion, than standard "box-profile" wheels of old. Not only has the metallurgy of the aluminum rims improved, but the quality of spokes seems to be better.

My rule of thumb:

If the rider & load combined weigh over 400# - Use 40 spoke wheels with 4x pattern for good reliability.

If the rider & load combined weigh between 300-400# - Use 36 spoke (minimum) wheels with 3x pattern (or more) for good reliability.

If the rider & load combined weigh between 250-300# - Use 32 spoke (minimum) wheels with 3x pattern for good reliability.

If the rider & load combined weigh less than 250# - Use anything you want.

I must confess, though, that I have personal experience only with the "less than 250# to 300#" segments of these recommendations. Also, the higher weight recommendations are based on reading and on my personal experience (of 30 years ago) of working in a bike shop as a mechanic & sales person.

Good luck!


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