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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

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Old 04-30-07, 12:51 PM   #1
Air
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Riding and 'cheating'

So I've started riding this roadie - put 85 miles on it this weekend. Problem is that it's much harder to get my heartrate up on it unless I'm really pushing it. On my mtb my rides would be almost 50% of a 2-3 hour ride above 85% of maximum. I'd have to slow down to stay more within that 'optimal' fat burning optimal area.

Which is better to ride and train on? I know the bike you want to ride the most is the best one, but I almost don't feel like I'm working all that hard on the roadie (except for my wrists that let me know, and boy do they let me know!). Should we be riding our slowest and heaviest bikes for everything except that long group ride or race?

If I do 15 miles in one hour on my roadie and 15 miles in one hour on my mtb I'll be working much harder on my mtb - would I be burning more calories or building more strength?

May seem like a silly question, but if I'm keeping track of how many calories I'm burning by riding I'm really curious how much the roadie will 'skew' those numbers.
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Old 04-30-07, 01:14 PM   #2
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do 20 miles on the roadie.
[edit: after you figure out the wrist thing]
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Old 04-30-07, 02:00 PM   #3
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Sounds like your putting too much weight on your wrists. Wrists and arms should be fairly loose and used for absorbing alot of the road. Did you get the bike fit? You could be reaching too far.

As far as training, kick it up. Do 17-20 miles in an hour. You will really feel it then. The roadie is a much lighter and more efficient machine.
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Old 04-30-07, 02:08 PM   #4
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I've been kicking ideas on the wrist issue over here. Too much weight - check. Solution...still working on it but thinking about swapping out the bars for something different.

I guess part of what I'm thinking about here is if the mtb is harder to pedal is there a different training/conditioning happening? If so then should we (rhetorical) look to train on different bikes to mix up the workouts a bit?
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Old 04-30-07, 03:08 PM   #5
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Its only harder because its heavier and chances are has fatter tires. The gearing "may" be part of it but if you are only going 15mph then its probably not.

You can simulate the MTB experience on the road bike with some loaded panniers. I don't think it will really be mixing things up too much. Ride the MTB bike @ 15mph or the road bike @ 20mph...

Riding the MTB bike might be a nice change if your wrists start hurting too much though.
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Old 04-30-07, 04:03 PM   #6
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When I got my road bike, I was able to increase my avg speed 2 to 4 miles per hour and keep my HR in the prime fat burning zone of 60-70%. I have been switching bikes to take my rides on, Mon, Wed and Friday, the Hybrid. All the other days, the road bike. It is working well for me as I am down about 10 lbs this month and have noticed my riding efficiency improving.
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Old 04-30-07, 07:55 PM   #7
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I hate to be trite, but the real answer is: do what you like. Riding hilly, technical singletrack will pound heck out of your entire body, working your arms almost as much as your legs. If you like the fat tires, ride 'em, and put the TIME in that you'd otherwise commit to your roadie.

If you like the road, then go out and push yourself a bit. Don't think that because it's easy at your current speed that it's going to be easy at ALL speeds. Go faster. Bring your cadence up to a reasonable 90 rpm. Then 100. Try 110 or 120 and tell me what you think. Still too easy? Climb some hills. Climb them again and again, then climb them faster.

You'll find that you're suddenly "training," not just "riding the bike." Trust me, your heart WILL respond and you'll learn to enjoy speed.

Oh, and remember, your body doesn't have an odometer. You train for TIME, not distance.

Hope it helps!
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