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Thread: Pedal selection

  1. #1
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    Pedal selection

    I picked up my new bike (Surly Cross Check) this week and after a couple of rides have found that my pedals are inadequate.

    I have been exploring my options, but thought I would ask what others are using. Are you using clipless, toe clips, platform or some other type pedals? Specifically, what brands and models are you using?

    I brought some cheap Bontrager pedals with toe clips at the local bike shop, but I have not installed them and may return them. I think that I may want to go with a large platform pedal because I have wide feet. I may supplement these with a Power Grip pedal strap. Is anyone using this configuration? If so, what is the name of the pedal you are using?

    I don't think I am ready for a clipless pedal. I am not going to be winning any races and like to have some flexibility as far as the footwear I choose. Is there a hybrid with a wide enough platform that would work if I was wearing a flip flop? Basically, I am looking for something that would work for a 20 to 30 mile ride, but is still versatile enough for when I want to run down the street to the store.

    Any advice that can offer with this selection would be appreciated. Thanks.

  2. #2
    Senior Member mkadam68's Avatar
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    Advice? Yeah. Steer clear of the flip-flops. Not good for any sort of athletic endeavor. At least use sneakers.

    Knowing that you probably aren't interested, but for what it's worth: I use clipless and won't use anything but.

    I'm a big guy (aren't we all in Clydesdales?) with size 12-1/2 wides. I wear 13s (or 48 in European) 'cause that's what fits. I use Look Keo Carbo-Ti clipless. No problems for me with big feet. The speedplays, I hear, also have a nice wide platform. I probably won't be winning any races anytime soon, either. But, there is flexibility in clipless as well (read: SPD's for walking around).

    Other than that, sorry, not too much advice here.

    Visit The C-Blog : the blog about cycling.

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    Senior Member lil brown bat's Avatar
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    I also use clipless -- it ain't about racing, and my shoes are pretty versatile (not all clipless shoes are the same). Shimano pedals. I have the same pedals on both bikes so I can use the same pair of shoes. My riding is mostly city commuting, and you'd never catch me using platforms or clips.

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    Senior Member jaxgtr's Avatar
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    I changed to clipless and would never go back. Presently using the Shimano Ultegra SPD-SL, although I also have a set of Look A3.1's. Found the that the Shimano's were a little more comfortable for me with the Pearl Izumi shoes I wear than the Look pedals. I also use Shimano SPD on my hybrid. There is a nice alternative though, the Shimano PD-M324 which has platform on one side and SPD on the other, so you can either use your SPD MTB shoes or plain shoes. I have these on my wifes bike cause she does not always want to use bike shoes so they are a perfect fit for her.

    http://bike.shimano.com/catalog/cycl...=1180186790679
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    Two wheels? I'm on it! rs hunter's Avatar
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    I use Speedplay pedals exclusively. The X series road model for when I'm riding "just to ride". The Frog mtb model the rest of the time. The nice thing with the Frog is that you're wearing a mountain shoe, which allows you better mobility when off the bike. I had problems with horrible knee pain, when I started out, using SPD-type pedals. The "free floating" nature of the Speedplay pedals ended the suffering, but some people may find it disconcerting, at least at first. I, however, will never ride with ANYTHING but Speedplays again! They may cost a liitle more (no generics out there), but how much are your knees worth?

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    The Site Administrator: Currently at home recovering from a couple of strokes,please contact my assistnt admins for forum issues Tom Stormcrowe's Avatar
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    I'm a retrogrouch and ride with period correct SP-250 Shimano Clip and Strap pedals. I've tried many clipless and just can't make the changeover.
    on light duty due to illness; please contact my assistants for forum issues. They are Siu Blue Wind, or CbadRider or the other 3 star folk. I am currently at home recovering from a couple of strokes. I am making good progress, happily.


    . “He who fights with monsters might take care lest he thereby become a monster. And if you gaze for long into an abyss, the abyss gazes also into you.”- Fredrick Nietzsche

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    Two wheels? I'm on it! rs hunter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Stormcrowe
    I'm a retrogrouch and ride with period correct SP-250 Shimano Clip and Strap pedals. I've tried many clipless and just can't make the changeover.
    I tried the "clip and strap" route, and I just couldn't get comfortable with it. In fact, to me, it just felt unsafe while I tried to deal with them. Funny ol' world, huh?

  8. #8
    The Site Administrator: Currently at home recovering from a couple of strokes,please contact my assistnt admins for forum issues Tom Stormcrowe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rs hunter
    I tried the "clip and strap" route, and I just couldn't get comfortable with it. In fact, to me, it just felt unsafe while I tried to deal with them. Funny ol' world, huh?
    Yep, but it's a hangover from my early touring and racing days, back in the '70's.
    on light duty due to illness; please contact my assistants for forum issues. They are Siu Blue Wind, or CbadRider or the other 3 star folk. I am currently at home recovering from a couple of strokes. I am making good progress, happily.


    . “He who fights with monsters might take care lest he thereby become a monster. And if you gaze for long into an abyss, the abyss gazes also into you.”- Fredrick Nietzsche

    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." - Immanuel Kant

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    Senior Curmudgeon FarHorizon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jfw0001
    ...Are you using clipless, toe clips, platform or some other type pedals? Specifically, what brands and models are you using?..
    Hi jfw0001!

    I use (and like very much) the "Primo Balance Series" pedals. They have a broad platform, well-made spikes that keep your soles in place on the pedal (even in rough travel), and magnesium construction.

    I have used toe clips, "mini" toe clips, power grips, and clipless. In my opinion, there is absolutely no need to be fastened to your pedal in any way unless you're racing. Many (most?) prefer clipless pedals, but I think that in most cases they're following style rather than practicality.

    The clipless afficionados claim improved pedaling efficiency. There is an efficiency advantage, but it is maximized only at well over 100 rpm pedal cadence ("spinning"). The advantage also applies if climbing, but even there, the advantage is lost of the cadence drops significantly.

    The clipless afficionados persistently ignore the hazards of being clipped to the bike in traffic, falling unexpectedly when forgetting to clip out, and being unable to anticipate emergency stops with sufficient lead-time to get unclipped. The hazards of being attached to the pedals far outweigh any (minor) efficiency advantages for the majority of riders.

    Racers can justify the disadvantages of clipless because efficiency is everything and they're willing to accept the hazards of the sport. For the rest of us, platform pedals (without toe clips, mini-clips, or power grips) RULE!

    Get yourself some good platform pedals with spikes. These are the safest and easiest-to-use of any pedal option you'll find. Happy shopping!

  10. #10
    Senior Member Wogster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Stormcrowe
    I'm a retrogrouch and ride with period correct SP-250 Shimano Clip and Strap pedals. I've tried many clipless and just can't make the changeover.
    I had a pair of clip and strap pedals in the 1970's it was funny, because I rode the bike to the bike shop, and bought the pedals, the guy at the store offered to install them for free, so I said sure.... I rode home with the clips on, it did take a few days to determine the right tightness on the straps, what was tight enough to work, but not tight enough to result in pinched feet. The worry I have now, is if I get a new set, about availability of straps in the future......

    Like I say though, they do work well on bikes where you might, for some reason like to use different footwear, at different times, like riding to church, shopping, etc. I have not personally tried clipless, the idea of spending $100 on a set of pedals, and another $100 on shoes, just doesn't appeal to me at the moment, although my birthday is coming up

  11. #11
    The Site Administrator: Currently at home recovering from a couple of strokes,please contact my assistnt admins for forum issues Tom Stormcrowe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wogsterca
    I had a pair of clip and strap pedals in the 1970's it was funny, because I rode the bike to the bike shop, and bought the pedals, the guy at the store offered to install them for free, so I said sure.... I rode home with the clips on, it did take a few days to determine the right tightness on the straps, what was tight enough to work, but not tight enough to result in pinched feet. The worry I have now, is if I get a new set, about availability of straps in the future......

    Like I say though, they do work well on bikes where you might, for some reason like to use different footwear, at different times, like riding to church, shopping, etc. I have not personally tried clipless, the idea of spending $100 on a set of pedals, and another $100 on shoes, just doesn't appeal to me at the moment, although my birthday is coming up
    Straps are easily available, either in Nylon Web or in Leather, or even in Carbon.

    http://www.rivbike.com/webalog/pedals_clips_straps/
    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/harris/pedals.html
    on light duty due to illness; please contact my assistants for forum issues. They are Siu Blue Wind, or CbadRider or the other 3 star folk. I am currently at home recovering from a couple of strokes. I am making good progress, happily.


    . “He who fights with monsters might take care lest he thereby become a monster. And if you gaze for long into an abyss, the abyss gazes also into you.”- Fredrick Nietzsche

    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." - Immanuel Kant

  12. #12
    Two wheels? I'm on it! rs hunter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FarHorizon
    The clipless afficionados claim improved pedaling efficiency. There is an efficiency advantage, but it is maximized only at well over 100 rpm pedal cadence ("spinning"). The advantage also applies if climbing, but even there, the advantage is lost of the cadence drops significantly.
    I'd have to argue the point with you on this. I rarely, if ever, "spin" along at a cadence of over 100rpm, yet on more than a few rides I've had my clipless pedals "save my bacon". The problem is that too many people think that the pedals are intended to simply keep their feet on the pedals. They are intended to allow you to use more of your muscles to apply driving force. It's a matter of not just pushing down on the pedals, but pulling up on them as well. I've been able to reach a summit of a climb, more than once, thanks solely to my ability to pull up on my pedals after the other muscles had essentially "given up". I can assure you, I wasn't even remotely close to a 100rpm cadence at the time.

    Quote Originally Posted by FarHorizon
    The clipless afficionados persistently ignore the hazards of being clipped to the bike in traffic, falling unexpectedly when forgetting to clip out, and being unable to anticipate emergency stops with sufficient lead-time to get unclipped. The hazards of being attached to the pedals far outweigh any (minor) efficiency advantages for the majority of riders.
    I've been riding with clipless pedals for years, and have never had any of these issues. In that time I have, however, seen people who weren't using clipless pedals fall flat on their face. The fact that they hadn't been using clipless pedals didn't help them any..... The trick is to be aware of your surroundings, not to mention smarter than your pedals. And, as I pointed out earlier, the efficiency advantage is ANYTHING but minor, as long as you actually know what you're doing when utilizing clipless pedals. They are NOT "shoe retainers".....

    Cheers

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    Senior Member Wogster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Stormcrowe
    Straps are easily available, either in Nylon Web or in Leather, or even in Carbon.

    http://www.rivbike.com/webalog/pedals_clips_straps/
    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/harris/pedals.html
    Those are American dealers, paying $10 for a 50 cent piece of leather is bad enough, paying $40 in customs, brokerage and taxes on top of that $10, is insane....

    If Nashbar wanted to make a killing, they would set up a deal with a logistics company, where they collect up Canadian orders, which have Canadian destination labels and waybills attached, these are loaded into a container, that is shipped to a logistics company, in Canada. They open the container and cross dock everything to a Canadian courier company, who deliver the items. Because one shipment (the container) crosses the border, only one brokerage needs to be done, a manifest contains all of the items and a single brokerage fee is paid, along with customs duties. A small Nashbar office in Canada processes Canadian payments, and collects the appropriate taxes. A second website (nashbar.ca?) would have Canadian pricing and shipping information, items where customs is due, it would be buried in the price). UPS, Purolator (a Canadian courier company) and Fedex, have logistics operations, not sure about DHL, they are not that big in Canada, and did once charge me US$50 in brokerage fees on a $10 item, that didn't even have customs due!

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    The Site Administrator: Currently at home recovering from a couple of strokes,please contact my assistnt admins for forum issues Tom Stormcrowe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wogsterca
    Those are American dealers, paying $10 for a 50 cent piece of leather is bad enough, paying $40 in customs, brokerage and taxes on top of that $10, is insane....

    If Nashbar wanted to make a killing, they would set up a deal with a logistics company, where they collect up Canadian orders, which have Canadian destination labels and waybills attached, these are loaded into a container, that is shipped to a logistics company, in Canada. They open the container and cross dock everything to a Canadian courier company, who deliver the items. Because one shipment (the container) crosses the border, only one brokerage needs to be done, a manifest contains all of the items and a single brokerage fee is paid, along with customs duties. A small Nashbar office in Canada processes Canadian payments, and collects the appropriate taxes. A second website (nashbar.ca?) would have Canadian pricing and shipping information, items where customs is due, it would be buried in the price). UPS, Purolator (a Canadian courier company) and Fedex, have logistics operations, not sure about DHL, they are not that big in Canada, and did once charge me US$50 in brokerage fees on a $10 item, that didn't even have customs due!
    on light duty due to illness; please contact my assistants for forum issues. They are Siu Blue Wind, or CbadRider or the other 3 star folk. I am currently at home recovering from a couple of strokes. I am making good progress, happily.


    . “He who fights with monsters might take care lest he thereby become a monster. And if you gaze for long into an abyss, the abyss gazes also into you.”- Fredrick Nietzsche

    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." - Immanuel Kant

  15. #15
    Folsom Prison Blues Kid-Cycle's Avatar
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    JFW,

    Sounds like you may be interested in a combination pedal…. platform on one side and SPD on the other. This will allow you to clip in when you are wearing your cycling shoes (i.e. a more vigorous or planned ride) or to jump on with flip flops to cruise down to the store.

    The SPD system utilizes a small cleat that is mounted in a recess on the bottom of mountain bike shoes. This allows you to comfortably walk in the shoes without cleat making contact with ground surface (road shoes with or without cleats are not intended for walking nor are they comfortable to walk in). I have the combo pedals on my converted mountain bike which I ride with or without cycling shoes and I have SPD pedals on my road bike. This allows me to ride either bike with the same shoes.

    You were also inquiring about the contact area between shoes and pedals. A decent pair of cycling shoes will have a rigid sole that transfers the pedal contact force relatively evenly over the entire ball of foot. With SPD pedals I haven’t had any problems from pressure points or ‘hot spots’ though some riders seem to.

    This might be what your looking for or not….

    Good luck
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    Senior Curmudgeon FarHorizon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rs hunter
    ...as I pointed out earlier, the efficiency advantage is ANYTHING but minor...
    Hi rs hunter!

    I respect your opinion (after all, you are in the majority and I'm not), but I must continue to disagree. Our difference of opinion may be just a difference of terrain. I live in Louisiana (the "land of flat"), and there are just NO hills here. For flats riding, I have tried being attached to the pedals many times and many ways. I just see no difference.

    In traffic, however, I frequently must make unanticipated emergency stops. Falling over could be fatal. Having my feet instantly free makes me a more relaxed, a more confident, and ultimately, a safer rider. Your experience may vary...

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    Shimano mx 30 pedal ?
    i use this flat pedal on my cross check,
    they work great to just hop on with what ever is
    on your feet. i know i loose some efficiency,
    the versatility is more important for me; plus
    i have big feet- this pedal is large.

  18. #18
    Thread Killer evblazer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FarHorizon
    Hi rs hunter!
    In traffic, however, I frequently must make unanticipated emergency stops. Falling over could be fatal. Having my feet instantly free makes me a more relaxed, a more confident, and ultimately, a safer rider. Your experience may vary...
    My wife just got a bike and went with clipless pedals for the first time. At first we got Speedplay Zeros but it was too hard for her being so tiny. Now she uses Speed Play Light action and loves em. They clip in and out with ease much easier then the toe cages she had there before.. She has <100 miles on them and clips in and out like they were just normal pedals. Once you grow accostumed to them it is second nature to get out your not trapped at least not with any clipless I have ever used.

    I took her Speedplay Zeros for my Fuji Touring Bike and being 290 the stiffer spring is nothing to me :-) I used to use SPD's but the Zeros are so much more comfortable to ride in and they don't hurt my knees at all. If you ride in bad weather, in hills or anywhere your pushing the pedals relentlessly clipless pedals really pay off. Before I had clipless I slipped a couple times in the rain and it just normal traffic and it never turned out well. Either road rash or bar in my crotch. If your really against clipless I think there are pedals that have pins in them to dig into your shoe a bit so you slip less. That will allow you to use any shoe, get out isntantly and still have some benefits of your foot being stuck to the pedal a little better.

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    Quote Originally Posted by FarHorizon
    Hi jfw0001!

    The clipless afficionados claim improved pedaling efficiency. There is an efficiency advantage, but it is maximized only at well over 100 rpm pedal cadence ("spinning"). The advantage also applies if climbing, but even there, the advantage is lost of the cadence drops significantly.

    The clipless afficionados persistently ignore the hazards of being clipped to the bike in traffic, falling unexpectedly when forgetting to clip out, and being unable to anticipate emergency stops with sufficient lead-time to get unclipped. The hazards of being attached to the pedals far outweigh any (minor) efficiency advantages for the majority of riders.
    What?!?!?
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    Two wheels? I'm on it! rs hunter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FarHorizon
    Hi rs hunter!

    I respect your opinion (after all, you are in the majority and I'm not), but I must continue to disagree. Our difference of opinion may be just a difference of terrain. I live in Louisiana (the "land of flat"), and there are just NO hills here. For flats riding, I have tried being attached to the pedals many times and many ways. I just see no difference.

    In traffic, however, I frequently must make unanticipated emergency stops. Falling over could be fatal. Having my feet instantly free makes me a more relaxed, a more confident, and ultimately, a safer rider. Your experience may vary...
    Hi FH,

    I think you're right, if you'd ever done some "nice" climbs (they're only nice after you've gone over the top!), I think you would see all the difference in the world. A ride that REALLY pushes your endurance will also show the benefits. I've had rides where, if it hadn't been for my ability to pull up on the pedals, I would've been stuck sitting on the side of the road. It's a unique workout for "muscles you never knew you had", but it's something you have to teach yourself to be able to do. If a rider doesn't push themselves to their limits, or work at using the "full revolution" pedalling technique, they might not see a significant difference. But, for the recreational cyclist, it's perfectly understandable. After all, not everyone's as fanatical, or obsessive, as some of us are..... *ahem*

    The tension adjustment on most clipless pedals can be a help, but even the light setting can be rather tight on some. The Speedplay Light Action, that 'evblazer' mentioned, gets my vote for "clipless newbies". You get all the benefits, with little restriction.

    Cheers
    Last edited by rs hunter; 05-27-07 at 12:27 AM.

  21. #21
    Two wheels? I'm on it! rs hunter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by evblazer
    My wife just got a bike and went with clipless pedals for the first time. At first we got Speedplay Zeros but it was too hard for her being so tiny. Now she uses Speed Play Light action and loves em. They clip in and out with ease much easier then the toe cages she had there before.. She has <100 miles on them and clips in and out like they were just normal pedals. Once you grow accostumed to them it is second nature to get out your not trapped at least not with any clipless I have ever used.

    I took her Speedplay Zeros for my Fuji Touring Bike and being 290 the stiffer spring is nothing to me :-) I used to use SPD's but the Zeros are so much more comfortable to ride in and they don't hurt my knees at all. If you ride in bad weather, in hills or anywhere your pushing the pedals relentlessly clipless pedals really pay off. Before I had clipless I slipped a couple times in the rain and it just normal traffic and it never turned out well. Either road rash or bar in my crotch. If your really against clipless I think there are pedals that have pins in them to dig into your shoe a bit so you slip less. That will allow you to use any shoe, get out isntantly and still have some benefits of your foot being stuck to the pedal a little better.
    I couldn't agree more! If you're sure about wanting platform pedals, try the Speedplay Drillium. They list them as being capable of withstanding 800lbs!!!
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    Senior Curmudgeon FarHorizon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bailcash09
    What?!?!?
    Did I stutter?

  23. #23
    Senior Member lil brown bat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FarHorizon
    Hi rs hunter!

    I respect your opinion (after all, you are in the majority and I'm not), but I must continue to disagree. Our difference of opinion may be just a difference of terrain. I live in Louisiana (the "land of flat"), and there are just NO hills here. For flats riding, I have tried being attached to the pedals many times and many ways. I just see no difference.

    In traffic, however, I frequently must make unanticipated emergency stops. Falling over could be fatal. Having my feet instantly free makes me a more relaxed, a more confident, and ultimately, a safer rider. Your experience may vary...
    Mine does. I live in a very hilly region of Massachusetts, but I ride my commuter bike in Boston. No hills to speak of, no shortage of crazy traffic, and I use clipless and love them. They're perfectly functional for flat city riding. It's a comfort level thing -- many people feel psychologically uncomfortable with clipless, fearing that they will be "attached to the pedals" in a way that prevents them from getting loose when they need to. That isn't really true, but if it's your fear, then it can easily become true, if you know what I mean. In that case, best stick to whatever you're comfortable with.

  24. #24
    Senior Curmudgeon FarHorizon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lil brown bat
    ...It's a comfort level thing...
    Hi lil brown bat! Thank you - we agree. In my opinion, though, "comfort level" doesn't just apply to psychological comfort.

    My summary of reasons for why I dislike clipless pedals follows:

    1. ERGONOMICS: I am bow-legged and flat-footed. The soles of my feet normally meet the pedal platform at an angle (the shoe sole is farther from the pavement on the inside of the foot than the outside). With platform pedals, I can push on the pedal with any part of my foot that I wish. With clipless pedals, the shoes and clips hold my soles parallel to the pavement causing ankle and heel pain. Some rare few adapters or pedals can address this, but why bother?

    2. SAFETY: Not all emergency stops can be anticipated. For riders adept at unclipping and perfect (I said perfect) at anticipating emergency stops, then (and only then) are clipless pedals as safe as platforms. Unfortunately, riders can't always clip out nor can they anticipate every emergency stop. In most cases, the fall is trivial - only a bruise or scuff (or a blow to the ego). It only takes once, however, for that fall to be fatal. The likelihood of serious injury or death rises significantly if you're riding in close urban traffic. I do.

    3. COST: Special (and expensive) shoes and pedals are required. Clipless pedals typically cost more than equivalent platforms. Clipless shoes (if I can find them in my size and width) are expensive. The shoes and clips must match the pedals.

    4. UNREALIZED BENEFITS: The efficiency factor is not significant for me. I don't race. I don't spin. I don't climb. Ever. If you want to do any of those things and are willing to tolerate the safety hazards of clipless, then yes - you're a clipless candidate. On flat pavement, at moderate speeds, in traffic, the "efficiency" factor of clipless pedals is zero.

    5. CONVENIENCE: I like to hop on the bike any time of the day or night to run an errand. My convenience would be impaired if I had to don special shoes to use the bike. This objection can be alleviated with pedals that have a clip on one side and a platform on the other, but only if your pedal manufacturer makes such a pedal (not all do).

    6. UTILITY: Road pedals are typically sold with rigid-soled shoes with protruding clips. Such shoes make normal walking impossible (thus the famous "spastic-duck" gait of the road rider in her/his pair of clipless shoes). The cleats damage floors. Floors damage cleats. How do I get off the bike, go into a restaurant (that requires shoes) and not get tossed out for damaging their floors? MTB shoes with recessed cleats alleviate some of this, but the cleats are often not fully recessed. This causes the same set of problems as with road shoes. No matter how you cut it, cycling shoes are just darned impractical off the bike.

    7. AESTHETICS: I don't wear jerseys. I don't like gaudy shoes either. When I ride, I do, however, wear spandex shorts (their comfort and abrasion-resistance justify them). I ride with a long T-shirt overhanging the shorts. This minimizes their embarrassing appearance. If I had Floyd Landis' body, I wouldn't worry; but this is the Clydes' forum, after all. I'd prefer not to attract additional attention with glow-in-the-dark shoes with clanky hardware that make me walk even funnier than I normally do. You may not care, but this is an issue to me (and this is my list).

    8. ORTHODOXY: I resent being told by the obviously clueless that I'm not a "real cyclist" until I use clipless pedals & shoes. I've been bicycling since before the majority of the "cycling-fashion-police" were born! I've done half-centuries on platform pedals without issues while my fellow riders (in their natty clipless gear) were lame after their rides. Why should my riding style have to conform to someone else's idea of what works? I have used toe-clips-with-straps (as early as the 1960's), half clips (on a fixed-gear!), clipless-pedals-with-dedicated-shoes, and power-grips. Having been there and done that, I find that I prefer platform pedals. So sue me!

    In summary, there are advantages to clipless pedals. If those advantages are of use to you and if you can otherwise tolerate the multiple disadvantages of clipless, then go for it! On the other hand, I've seen time and time again here on Bike Forums - posters gang up on the undecided and virtually brow-beat them into choosing and using clipless systems regardless of whether that option is the best or not. The amazed comments (What?!?!) that follow any recommendation against clipless are unwarranted. There are multiple valid reasons why clipless may not be the best solution for a specific rider. Only by fairly evaluating both sides of the decision can an individual select the best personal option. I say clipless may be fine - but you should fully evaluate the alternatives too.

    Peace!
    Last edited by FarHorizon; 05-27-07 at 09:17 AM.

  25. #25
    Senior Member Wogster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FarHorizon
    Hi lil brown bat! Thank you - we agree. In my opinion, though, "comfort level" doesn't just apply to psychological comfort.

    My summary of reasons for why I dislike clipless pedals follows:

    Peace!
    I think that both sides will need to agree to disagree on this one, some people prefer clipless, some people prefer clips/straps, and some people prefer neither.

    My brother-in-law swears by clipless, I still think clips work just fine, if it worked perfectly in 1978, i should work just as well today, some technologies need to be updated (I wouldn't want to type this on a Commodore Pet for example ), some technologies really don't. Then again, I really wish I still had my 1978 Sekine 10 speed, man that bike was a dream.......

    For you, with your leg problems use the platforms, the thing is, to just get out there, and ride.....

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