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  1. #1
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    Conditioning your sit bones..?

    I was wondering if any one had any advice/strategies on conditioning your sit bones to a saddle. I have ridden on the road for several years, but this year is my first real effort to get back into road riding. I have a new Serotta that has been custom fitted. The bike and bike fit feels great, but I can get my sit bones to back to where they don't hurt after each ride.

    I have tried a plethora of saddles including a Brooks Swift on a previous and ill fitting bike, so I will most likely give several saddles another try. However, my sit bones still complain. I guess the most obvious solution is to just ride more. TIA

  2. #2
    Fun in the tub, no ring! mrbubl's Avatar
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    more saddle time and correct fit and position....

  3. #3
    Senior Member JumboRider's Avatar
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    Brooks

  4. #4
    The Site Administrator: Currently at home recovering from a couple of strokes,please contact my assistnt admins for forum issues Tom Stormcrowe's Avatar
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    All of the above and it's not so much conditioning the sit bones as developing the Gluteus muscles and leg muscles. As you get stronger, you support more of your weight with your legs and use the saddle more for balance reference than support, although you do still use it.

    The Brooks or other leather saddles give you a more compliant "Hammock" effect and provide a comfortable surface without padding deformation rubbing bits that aren't supposed to be rubbed or pressured. The also breathe and move air better than the synthetics and just get more comfortable with age. It sounds weird, a harder saddle being more comfortable than that cushy padded saddle, but it's true!
    on light duty due to illness; please contact my assistants for forum issues. They are Siu Blue Wind, or CbadRider or the other 3 star folk. I am currently at home recovering from a couple of strokes. I am making good progress, happily.


    . “He who fights with monsters might take care lest he thereby become a monster. And if you gaze for long into an abyss, the abyss gazes also into you.”- Fredrick Nietzsche

    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." - Immanuel Kant

  5. #5
    Senior Member rkimble's Avatar
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    Interesting topic here, so would you suggest working out the legs and glutes with weight training? Or would more seat time have the same effect?

  6. #6
    The Site Administrator: Currently at home recovering from a couple of strokes,please contact my assistnt admins for forum issues Tom Stormcrowe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rkimble
    Interesting topic here, so would you suggest working out the legs and glutes with weight training? Or would more seat time have the same effect?
    It's all about the saddle time! That develops the specific muscle groups.

    As a slight off topic, a lot oc cycling develops the quads more than the adductor muscles (Back of the leg to the Glutes and this can lead to SI joint issues (Sacral region of the spine and the pelvis joining, just below the Lumbar region). Learn stretching exercises like crossing one leg behind the other and stretching in the opposite direction by side bends, equally in both sides of the body to counter this.
    on light duty due to illness; please contact my assistants for forum issues. They are Siu Blue Wind, or CbadRider or the other 3 star folk. I am currently at home recovering from a couple of strokes. I am making good progress, happily.


    . “He who fights with monsters might take care lest he thereby become a monster. And if you gaze for long into an abyss, the abyss gazes also into you.”- Fredrick Nietzsche

    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." - Immanuel Kant

  7. #7
    Senior Member JumboRider's Avatar
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    Saddle time and having your wife spank you.....jk

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Stormcrowe
    this can lead to SI joint issues (Sacral region of the spine and the pelvis joining, just below the Lumbar region).
    That is an interesting observation. Over the years I have had ongoing issues with my SI joint and L5. I will also try being more diligent with my stretching...

  9. #9
    The Site Administrator: Currently at home recovering from a couple of strokes,please contact my assistnt admins for forum issues Tom Stormcrowe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by burlsube
    That is an interesting observation. Over the years I have had ongoing issues with my SI joint and L5. I will also try being more diligent with my stretching...
    Just a little tidbit I picked up crewing RAAM last year.....it's a common issue with ultraendurance riders.
    on light duty due to illness; please contact my assistants for forum issues. They are Siu Blue Wind, or CbadRider or the other 3 star folk. I am currently at home recovering from a couple of strokes. I am making good progress, happily.


    . “He who fights with monsters might take care lest he thereby become a monster. And if you gaze for long into an abyss, the abyss gazes also into you.”- Fredrick Nietzsche

    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." - Immanuel Kant

  10. #10
    Senior Member
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    1st ride on a new brooks b17 yesterday.......no pain.....

  11. #11
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    After another ride tonight I am thinking that part of my problem is that my saddle is too wide. At the bottom of every stroke I seem to be hitting the back/inner part of my leg on the flare of the saddle. I had a similar experience when I tried Selle An Atomica I am currently riding a 155 Specialized Avatar - maybe it is time to try the 143.... or another saddle
    .

  12. #12
    Neil_B
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    Quote Originally Posted by rkimble
    Interesting topic here, so would you suggest working out the legs and glutes with weight training? Or would more seat time have the same effect?
    I think resistance training is good for almost anybody, including cyclists. Personally I train with weights and do stretches because 40 years of a sedentary lifestyle combined with my rapid weight loss has left me with little muscular development, and because as a person with scoliosis, knocked knees, and leg length discrepancy, muscles and good posture help me stabilize my spine, keep me pain-free, and prevent me from looking like Shakespeare's Richard III.

  13. #13
    Neil_B
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Stormcrowe
    It's all about the saddle time! That develops the specific muscle groups.

    As a slight off topic, a lot oc cycling develops the quads more than the adductor muscles (Back of the leg to the Glutes and this can lead to SI joint issues (Sacral region of the spine and the pelvis joining, just below the Lumbar region). Learn stretching exercises like crossing one leg behind the other and stretching in the opposite direction by side bends, equally in both sides of the body to counter this.
    And don't forget to stretch the hamstrings!

  14. #14
    Senior Member Winter76's Avatar
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    I bought a wider seat with springs and used that for the first few months, after that I was able to switch back to the skinnier saddle no problem and no pain.
    3 years commuting while there's no snow on the ground. 20km round trip.
    Quote Originally Posted by madfiNch
    What's the point of a bike if you can only ride it on weekends, and you can't even carry anything with you?!

  15. #15
    "Purgatory Central" Wino Ryder's Avatar
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    I say try the Brooks 'Swift' again, only this time on your fitted Serotta, providing you ride 'bent over', like on a regular road bike. The Brooks 'Swift' and the 'Professional' favor a more leaned over, aggressive "in the drops" position than the B-17 or the other "B" saddles. If your riding position is more up right, or not as aggressive, like where you're bent over slightly, then by all means get the 'B-17'. If you feel the 'B-17' is too wide for your sit bones, but your riding position still favors a more upright stance, then get the "B-17 N (narrow) which cuts 30 mm off the width, but otherwise stays the same.

    Like the other posters said, along with the excellent advice from (his majesty) Mr.Stormcrowe , I would say you need more saddle time to acclimate yourself. By acclimating yourself on a Brooks, then you're eliminating the expensive and time consuming waste of trying out other saddles. Once the leather on a Brooks wears in, or forms to your sit bones, the pressure of your weight will be spread out more evenly over the saddle, decreasing pressure not only in your sit bones, but in the perrenial region of your crotch. The result is a saddle that has been specifically formed for you, and the intracasies of your own personal posterior. In most cases its the saddle that ends all saddles. That, my friend, is why Brooks has a cult following worldwide.

    Personally, I use a Brooks 'Pro' on my road bike, with about 8000 miles on it. Its the only saddle I've ever used where I can go on a 50 mile ride without wearing padded cycling shorts. But thats just me.
    ~ "I like the way the brake cables come out of the top of the levers and loop around to the brake calipers!...I like those downtube shifters too!...No no no, don't take 'em off, don't take 'em off,...leave 'em on, leave 'em on! - Thats right baby!!

    ~BF - Steel Club Member #00051

  16. #16
    your nightmare gal chipcom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JumboRider
    Saddle time and having your wife spank you.....jk
    Ya know, beating me to a punchline isn't nice.
    "Let us hope our weapons are never needed --but do not forget what the common people knew when they demanded the Bill of Rights: An armed citizenry is the first defense, the best defense, and the final defense against tyranny. If guns are outlawed, only the government will have guns. Only the police, the secret police, the military, the hired servants of our rulers. Only the government -- and a few outlaws. I intend to be among the outlaws" - Edward Abbey

  17. #17
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    I will give the Swift another try and see how things work out. I have a very slight drop form my saddle to handlebars and tend to have a semi aggressive stance. I may try the B17N from Wall Bike just for comparison.

    Any tips for setting up the Swift? I seem to remember reading something about leveling the back of the saddle as opposed to the front....

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