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-   Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) (http://www.bikeforums.net/clydesdales-athenas-200-lb-91-kg/)
-   -   Any major Clydes on Tri-bikes? (http://www.bikeforums.net/clydesdales-athenas-200-lb-91-kg/311876-any-major-clydes-tri-bikes.html)

KingTermite 06-20-07 01:56 PM

Any major Clydes on Tri-bikes?
 
I had a discussion with another forum member I rode with once, about a year ago (BeeTL). He rides a Tri-bike, even though he doesn't do triathlons, because of carpel-tunnel in his arms or something like that. After discussing with him what made it better and researching it a bit, I began to wonder if this might be a good geometry for me for a road bike. I am a major clyde (e.g. 300+ => about 320 pounds).

Most Tri bikes I've looked at online, look very high-end and don't look to be tops in the "sturdy" department we clydes need. Are there sturdy tri bikes? Maybe steel frame ones? I do see some with plenty of spokes in their wheels, but not sure otherwise.

What brands would be sturdier types? I am not wanting to do triathlons either...just thinking it might be a good geometry. Any suggestions for a sturdy one that is not high-end priced? If I get some good suggestions, maybe I can find a local retailer and test ride some.

CastIron 06-20-07 02:30 PM

I'd look at some of the AL framed jobs from the major manufacturers. Comparatively speaking they aren't that expensive. Tri bikes are more concerned with aero than weight as a rule (though plenty of weight weenie rigs abound) which may be an O.K. thing for a clyde.

KingTermite 06-20-07 02:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CastIron
I'd look at some of the AL framed jobs from the major manufacturers. Comparatively speaking they aren't that expensive. Tri bikes are more concerned with aero than weight as a rule (though plenty of weight weenie rigs abound) which may be an O.K. thing for a clyde.

Yeah....I was really trying to avoid Al. It's probably the only material I do specifically avoid. I hate that stiff suspension where you feel every bump.

My current road bike is steel. I was told at my old lbs in FL that Carbon would be OK (and they were super honest...not just trying to sell a bike).

What do you guys think about a Super Clyde on carbon?

CastIron 06-20-07 03:37 PM

I really don't worry about the frames too much. They've been in service for over 20 years now and still keep getting lighter. Having said that, after looking DEEP into the fine print of my Scott I found a 110Kg weight limit, so do check carefully. Wheels I'd worry about. As usual.

UtRacerDad 06-20-07 04:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by KingTermite
Yeah....I was really trying to avoid Al. It's probably the only material I do specifically avoid. I hate that stiff suspension where you feel every bump.

My current road bike is steel. I was told at my old lbs in FL that Carbon would be OK (and they were super honest...not just trying to sell a bike).

What do you guys think about a Super Clyde on carbon?

the bike I ride is a 2006 lemond versillia, this is a half carbon / half steel frame, I've only got about 1200 on it so far, but I did have to change the wheels, other than that it has been a beautiful bike I have no complaints and it is smooth and very nice to ride. Not exactly a tri bike but it does fit the need. I think if you go carbon it should be ok, you will notice that the ride is much smoother and you don't seem to feel the road as much.

(51) 06-20-07 04:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by KingTermite
What do you guys think about a Super Clyde on carbon?

I shudder at the thought.http://www.feebleminds-gifs.com/smiley-faces-28.gif

DavisClydesdale 06-20-07 09:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by KingTermite
Yeah....I was really trying to avoid Al. It's probably the only material I do specifically avoid. I hate that stiff suspension where you feel every bump.

Then you would probably not want a tri bike and might prefer a road bike with aero bars. Most tri bikes have extremely stiff frames so you can transfer all of your energy to the wheels rather than flexing the frame. They are built for one purpose, and that is speed.

surfjimc 06-20-07 09:40 PM

I'm a large Clyde getting smaller, started at 290 and am now at 265. Used to race at 175-180 in a different lifetime. I just bought a 62cm Motobecane carbon frame and love it. I decked it out with Dura Ace and Ksyrium SSC's. Came in at 17.25 lbs. I would never have pictured myself on a bike so light or short of steel. Rides so soft and smooth: it was unnerving at first. I can't believe I didn't do this before. I think you could pull something like that off. So far about 1000 miles and no issues with frame or wheels. Good luck.

Halthane 06-20-07 09:51 PM

I have aerobars on my road bike that I really love, It's really quite comfortable and I really get more power to the wheels in that stance. I'm probably going to convert my current commuter into a TT type bike when I get a new road bike in the winter since I have almost everything I need to do the conversion except another set of aerobars and bar-ends, and I'm going to be doing the bike leg of several team triathlons next spring, (If I can lose enough weight to start running again I'm gonna do a half by myself ;)

Paul


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