Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 06-22-07, 12:46 PM   #1
tpederson
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Bikes:
Posts: 6
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Trek Mods for 6'5 350lb Man

I posted in General, but someone said I should post here. I have a trek 7300 that keeps breaking on me and I was wondering what things I should replace/reenforce to stop it from breaking on me.

Original Post:

http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread...=1#post4707997
tpederson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-07, 02:25 PM   #2
KingTermite 
On my TARDIScycle!
 
KingTermite's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Eastside Seattlite Termite Mound
Bikes: Trek 520, Trek Navigator 300, Peugeot Versailles PE10DE
Posts: 3,924
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I don't think the bike shop guy lied to you....that shouldn't be happening. I started riding a similar bike (Trek Navigator) when I started @ about 375 pounds and never had any issues like that. I would have a serious talk with your bike shop and ask if they have a lemon clause for their bike sales.

You shouldn't be having those type of problems, unless you are riding it particularly hard. Do you ride it on paved surfaces, no major bumps? No mountain bike type antics like jumping or anything? Just checkin......
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by coffeecake View Post
- it's pretty well established that Hitler was an *******.
KingTermite is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-07, 02:59 PM   #3
(51)
Perma-Clyde
 
(51)'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Suncoast, FL
Bikes: Trek Hybrid 7200
Posts: 931
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I'm about your size. I've had a Trek 7200 for 1.5 years now and have logged over 5,500 miles. I popped a couple of spokes at 2,000 miles, but since they have been hand-build with DT spokes there has not been a problem. I had the chain replaced, but only after 4,000 miles because it was stretched. The crank arms are fine, but I don't stand up and mash on them either. The left one became loose shortly after I bought the bike, but once I tightened it, there was not an issue.

Maybe your LBS failed to assemble it properly in the first place. Have they guaranteed their work?

Like KT mentioned, what kind of riding do you do?

I would recommend:
Having your wheels hand-built with DT spokes. The mfg. spokes just aren't as strong.
Get a Thomson Elite seatpost. I replaced the shock absorber post with a cheapo and paid the price (seatpost failure).
The plastic pedals never failed on me, but I replaced them because my feet started slipping.

Last edited by (51); 06-22-07 at 03:06 PM.
(51) is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-07, 03:10 PM   #4
Halthane
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Manhattan KS
Bikes: 2001 Giant OCR w/105-10spd, Schwinn High-Plains Built for Commute plus 3 Others in Various Stages of Rebuild/Repair
Posts: 431
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I think the first response to your initial post is probably pretty spot on. Losing a crank and breaking the chain seem like factory error. The wheel issue is probably due to it being machine built, not surprising with a bigger ridder, you might see about having your lbs build you some or check out some of the builders on the net. The shifting issues are probably due to adjustment, see the affore mentioned www.sheldonbrown.com for how to adjust it yourself if you are mechanically inclined. But if your LBS is a quality shop they will likely make those adjustments for you for free, ask them to make sure that the chain breaking didn't damage the rear derailer (a real possibility). As far as the plastic pedals, they probably aren't as bad as you think, but a decent pair of platforms can be had for 15-20 bucks, I have bontragers on my Grocery hauler that have survived much abuse.

There are many people in the clyde forum here who would be very happy to help you with any more questions you have.

Paul
Halthane is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-07, 03:17 PM   #5
JumboRider
Senior Member
 
JumboRider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Bikes:
Posts: 667
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
The parts that you mention are the typical parts that us super-clydes tear up. It would help if you list the make of the parts that have failed and how many spokes your wheels have. I assume you had stock parts and that the bike is a 2007. I would also assume you are doing fairly gentle street and bike path type of riding.

I don't know much about bike parts but the guys and gals here know their stuff and I am sure will put in their 2 cents. I do know that I wanted hand built wheels with 36 or more spokes. Hand built tend to avoid structural defects found in machine built wheels. Most of the time these defects don't hurt anything, but we clydes put more stress on them than most.

Hang in there. I don't think the lbs was trying to screw you, The LBS and the guys here will get you up and running in no time.
JumboRider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-07, 03:18 PM   #6
UtRacerDad
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Utah
Bikes: Road & Mountain
Posts: 189
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by tpederson
I posted in General, but someone said I should post here. I have a trek 7300 that keeps breaking on me and I was wondering what things I should replace/reenforce to stop it from breaking on me.

Original Post:

http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread...=1#post4707997
I was never really able to ride on factory wheels, I ended up have to get a set of rhino lites custom built. since that time I never had any problems with the rims at all, I have broken spokes but on the other hand I've put nearly 8000 miles on those rims. I just had the same time of problem with my road bike that is less than 6 months old, so I ended up getting rims that had a much higher spoke count than normal, I've ridden on them for about two weeks now and have had no problems, but then I need to ride on them for about another month before I start to figure that I won't have any problems.

the other stuff is just a failure at the factory on the QA dept, however if you purchased it at a LBS they should cover stuff like that without cost.
UtRacerDad is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-07, 03:46 PM   #7
tpederson
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Bikes:
Posts: 6
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
To answer the question about my riding habits: I ride that thing like it's made out of crystal/gold. I'm as easy on it as I can possibly be. I do only road/sidewalk driving between work and home.

Yes, they complained about covering the chain, but after the guy said, "Ohh? The factory chains break on those all the time." I had them put on a much better chain at no cost. They have also trued my wheels and replaced that crank arm at no cost. They've been good to me so far, my big concern is that every failure seems to happen when Im miles away from my house. I've been trying to commute to and from work but every failure makes me lose confidence in the bike. I'll go and talk to them about new wheels. But, the clicking isn't a derailer adjustment as I and my friend (who can strip bikes in his sleep) have both adjusted it. It might be a defective link, it clicks without any stress on it.
tpederson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-07, 03:55 PM   #8
Terrierman
Senior Member
 
Terrierman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: SWMO
Bikes:
Posts: 3,185
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 553 Post(s)
Clicking chain can be a locked up link.
__________________
It's all downhill from here. Except the parts that are uphill.
Terrierman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-07, 05:51 PM   #9
Tom Stormcrowe
Out fishing with Annie on his lap, a cigar in one hand and a ginger ale in the other, watching the sunset.
 
Tom Stormcrowe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: South Florida
Bikes: Techna Wheelchair and a Sun EZ 3 Recumbent Trike
Posts: 16,119
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by tpederson
To answer the question about my riding habits: I ride that thing like it's made out of crystal/gold. I'm as easy on it as I can possibly be. I do only road/sidewalk driving between work and home.

Yes, they complained about covering the chain, but after the guy said, "Ohh? The factory chains break on those all the time." I had them put on a much better chain at no cost. They have also trued my wheels and replaced that crank arm at no cost. They've been good to me so far, my big concern is that every failure seems to happen when Im miles away from my house. I've been trying to commute to and from work but every failure makes me lose confidence in the bike. I'll go and talk to them about new wheels. But, the clicking isn't a derailer adjustment as I and my friend (who can strip bikes in his sleep) have both adjusted it. It might be a defective link, it clicks without any stress on it.
Go through and try to wiggle each link of the chain and see if it's able to articulate like it's supposed to.
(Hint, wear latex gloves or the like to prevent black gooky fingers!)

What lube are you using on the chain? Improper lube can cause that clicky chain, or a bad link, or a power link (master link) not seated correctly. I use a dry wax base lube. It's called White Lightning, and once it dries, it's a great lube that doesn't attract dirt and dust.
__________________
. “He who fights with monsters might take care lest he thereby become a monster. And if you gaze for long into an abyss, the abyss gazes also into you.”- Fredrick Nietzsche

"We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." - Immanuel Kant
Tom Stormcrowe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-07, 06:01 PM   #10
tpederson
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Bikes:
Posts: 6
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Ok, will do. Thanks.
tpederson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-07, 06:06 PM   #11
bdinger
Chubby super biker
 
bdinger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Nebraska
Bikes:
Posts: 1,980
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
You should not be having those problems, sounds like it is definitely a lemon.

I'm currently 6ft 2 and hovering right above/below the 370 range. I bought a Trek 7.3FX when I was back over 400 in the late winter. The only thing I had problems with is the rear wheel, which gave me constant headaches. After a couple busted spokes, the LBS handbuilt a 32h RhynoLite with DT spokes and a Deore hub, it gave me about 400 miles before a spoke busted yesterday. And I don't blame it, it's been ABUSED for the past 400 miles. Two 40+ mile rides on crushed limestone that gets pretty rough, commuting on rather nasty streets.. you name it, it takes it.

My other bike, a '07 Specialized Hardrock Sport has been basically trouble free for the almost 900 miles I've put on it. And I really beat it up. That's not past tense, either, I really am NOT nice to that bike. And it just takes it, no problem at all. After my commute the other day on it, and taking a construction staple out of the tire (no punctured tube, though ) I noticed the rear wheel is out of true. And it's got a click in the pedals. I figure that all I've put it through, if that's all it's doing.. well..

What I'm getting at is that the bike is probably a lemon. That's quite a bit of problems to be having on a bike with so little miles. I'd suggest asking them what your options are.

Oh, and for the record, my next bike will be a Surly Long Haul Trucker. Those things are tanks, and worth every penny.
bdinger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-07, 06:09 PM   #12
JumboRider
Senior Member
 
JumboRider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Bikes:
Posts: 667
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Hey

Now watch it. Big Liberty Blue is a lady. She does not like being called a tank.
JumboRider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-07, 08:23 PM   #13
Terrierman
Senior Member
 
Terrierman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: SWMO
Bikes:
Posts: 3,185
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 553 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by JumboRider
Now watch it. Big Liberty Blue is a lady. She does not like being called a tank.
Some ladies like to be ridden harder than others.
__________________
It's all downhill from here. Except the parts that are uphill.
Terrierman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-23-07, 05:28 AM   #14
ang1sgt
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Chili, NY
Bikes: 88 Fisher Gemini tandem, 92 Trek 970, 07 Nashbar Frame, 08 Gary Fisher Paragon
Posts: 733
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Get the bike in a stand and BACK PEDAL the crank while watching the derailleur as the chain is passing through. If it jumps, there is a tight link and it needs to be searched out.

If this doesn't find it, taking a shop rag and a few fingers, make the chain pass through the rag in an "S" bend while lightly pedalling the crank. I only do this on the lower section of the chain so worst case the rag goes towards the derailluer and not my hand into the crank. You will feel a tight link or the rag may snag the loose side plate, either which could cause some of your problems.

The 7300 has a pretty basic crank on them. If you are still stressing them, you may need to go to at least an LX quailty Bottom bracket and crank and have that installed and properly torqued in place. I doubt the LBS would do this for free, but he might be able to cut a deal to please you on this.

Have you talked, or the Dealer Talked with their TREK rep on these problems? Every TREK I've built this year has had a Quality Assurance mail in card with it. TREK wants to know what they are doing right and wrong and it is up to the LBS to provide this input. The LBS needs to make the time to do this.
ang1sgt is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:27 PM.