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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

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Old 06-25-07, 07:05 PM   #1
Bgurl
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Athenas and Durable Wheels

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Last edited by Bgurl; 01-09-12 at 11:28 PM.
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Old 06-25-07, 07:24 PM   #2
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A better, IMO, and possible cheaper solution is a hand built set of 32 spoke rims with mid-range quality hubs. Trick is to find a good wheelsmith nearby, not just a shop mechanic. However, you may get a few thousand miles out of those wheels, maybe until the rims wear down from braking.
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Old 06-25-07, 09:10 PM   #3
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Old 06-26-07, 05:37 AM   #4
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Bgurl, you really don't look heavy enough to have issues with 99% of the wheels out there.

The biggest advantage to hand built by an experienced builder is that "Human Touch" where the builders experience is able to compensate for slight irregularities in the rim and more correct tensioning of the spokes rather than the machine averaged tension. It generally means a better wheel in the long run.
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Old 06-26-07, 08:56 AM   #5
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How long a wheel lasts is influenced by too many factors for anyone to make even an educated guess. I rode a set of machine built wheels that I paid 30.00 at a swap meet for 12000 miles before the freehub finally failed. The sidewalls were so worn that it wasn't worth fixing them. On my fair weather bike the rear wheel lasted a grand total of 600 miles before the rim cracked around the eyelets. I now have a favourite wheel builder but up until coming across him I had no better luck with handbuilt or machine built.

Just keep riding them and make sure that when you are cleaning your bike you take a look at the condition of the rim and hub so that you can detect any problems before you are too far from home.
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Old 06-26-07, 06:10 PM   #6
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Old 06-26-07, 07:07 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by Bgurl
Thank you for the advice. I will keep my eye on the condition of the rim. So far so good! And thanks Tom, but I am 5'4 (no weight info) and can be a bit heavy on the bike.
To get the most distance out of your wheels you need to ride "light". That means to rise off the saddle going over road imperfections that you can't avoid, this applies to a rider that is 100lbs as much as to the uber˛ clyde you sometimes find around here (do we have any at the moment?). I'll agree with Tom, you don't look heavy enough for it to be a major concern......
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Old 06-26-07, 09:59 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by Wogsterca
To get the most distance out of your wheels you need to ride "light". That means to rise off the saddle going over road imperfections that you can't avoid, this applies to a rider that is 100lbs as much as to the uber˛ clyde you sometimes find around here (do we have any at the moment?). I'll agree with Tom, you don't look heavy enough for it to be a major concern......
+1000. Riding light is what keeps my wheels in amazingly good shape, even though I'm riding 32h wheels at 360+ pounds! I commute on that one every day on streets that aren't very happy, and just getting out of the saddle seems to be the ticket.

I think you should be fine on those wheels. If you recently purchased the bike, after about 100-200 miles (depending on what you ride a week) take the bike back to the shop and ask them to tension/true both of the wheels for you. Most will do this gratis, but hopefully they actually DO it .

One other tip, and I do this often, is to just give each spoke a quick pull a couple times a week and check for any that may be overly loose or possibly broken. I've had broken spokes look fine, then I pull gently and it falls right out. It's weird, but it happens.
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Old 06-26-07, 11:31 PM   #9
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The Race Lites are actually pretty strong wheels. I started riding mine when I was 335 or so and they held up really well, you don't look like your anywhere near 335, so I think you will be ok. Never had any problems with them at all, I really like them.



[QUOTE=Bgurl]How long can I expect my Bontrager Race Lites to last being an Athena? If there ever do fail, would Mavic Ksyriums do the trick? I'm thinking the SL's are the $800'ish model
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