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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

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Old 07-02-07, 10:16 PM   #1
ddmann
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Second Ride and I Starting Making the Adjusments

As some of you know my shopping trip to buy a cycloputer for the TT portion of Jumbo's Challenge turned into a full fledged credit card whacking. Last night when I got home it was too dark to go for a ride but I was able to be home by 8:00 tonight so I headed out. I strapped my trusty bag with my multi-tool inside of it and headed out. It took about 5 attempts to get the seat height correct, another 3 or 4 to get the seat position correct. It seemed pretty close at that point so I rode for a good fifteen minutes before I made my next adjustment. This is the first bike I have ever owned with drops and it is hard for me to make the change. I constantly screw up the shifting although I think I finally have that beat into my head, (mind you I own a rather thick skull). I was trying to ride on "the horns" as the guy at the LBS told me to do. My wrists were killing me and I was thinking I gonna have to walk this bike home when it dawned on me I could adjust them myself!! (I did mention the thick skull right?). Anyway I pulled over and rotated them up about an inch and a half .......voila soooo much more comfortable.

According to my el cheapo puter I rode 7.4 miles tonight at an average speed of 8 mph, I guess all that stopping for adjustments took a toll on the average. My legs are tired but I seem to run out of breath long before my legs burn too badly. And I am going back to that neighborhood again. I have never seen so many good looking joggers and walkers, (as Dr. Phil says "it is a target rich environment"). oo La La

I was so busy stopping to adjust everything that I completely forgot to do a TT. Sorry Jumbo I will just have to wait a month on the TT time, but I assume you recorded me weight.

BTW anyone have any advice on adapting from flat bar riding to drop bar riding?
As some of you know my shopping trip to buy a cycloputer for the TT portion of Jumbo's Challenge turned into a full fledged credit card whacking. Last night when I got home it was too dark to go for a ride but I was able to be home by 8:00 tonight so I headed out. I strapped my trusty bag with my multi-tool inside of it and headed out. It took about 5 attempts to get the seat height correct, another 3 or 4 to get the seat position correct. It seemed pretty close at that point so I rode for a good fifteen minutes before I made my next adjustment. This is the first bike I have ever owned with drops and it is hard for me to make the change. I constantly screw up the shifting although I think I finally have that beat into my head, (mind you I own a rather thick skull). I was trying to ride on "the horns" as the guy at the LBS told me to do. My wrists were killing me and I was thinking I gonna have to walk this bike home when it dawned on me I could adjust them myself!! (I did mention the thick skull right?). Anyway I pulled over and rotated them up about an inch and a half .......voila soooo much more comfortable.

According to my el cheapo puter I rode 7.4 miles tonight at an average speed of 8 mph, I guess all that stopping for adjustments took a toll on the average. My legs are tired but I seem to run out of breath long before my legs burn too badly. And I am going back to that neighborhood again. I have never seen so many good looking joggers and walkers, (as Dr. Phil says "it is a target rich environment"). oo La La

I was so busy stopping to adjust everything that I completely forgot to do a TT. Sorry Jumbo I will just have to wait a month on the TT time, but I assume you recorded me weight.

BTW anyone have any advice on adapting from flat bar riding to drop bar riding?
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Old 07-03-07, 01:59 AM   #2
c_m_shooter
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Don't worry about the drops, they're only for bombing downhills. When you're in a busy environment it's best to ride on the hoods where you can reach the brake levers, but when you're cruising you can try lots of different hand postions on the tops of the bars.
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Old 07-03-07, 05:13 AM   #3
ang1sgt
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Sounds like your stem length and angle might not be optimum for you. Does the Shop where you bought the Bike do FITS? That is where someone actually takes measurements and then takes a look at you ON THE BIKE and will then re-position or replace things to get the correct FIT for you on the bike.

Even with a FIT, there are times you need to make slight changes in the bike to get it right. You are doing the right thing by riding the bike and having the tools with you to make slight adjustments. It takes me a few long rides to dial a new bike in, and then I lock it down and in hidden spots make alignment marks with a wide Sharpie so that I have a reference mark to get the bike back when it's taken apart.

Of course on my new Clyde Bike all my stuff is BLACK, so I need to find a Silver Sharpie to make these marks on this bike.

Work up to more miles, and try doing breathing exercises to fill your lungs. Use your diaphram muscles and really take in some nice slow deep breaths. Do this while on the bike either coasting or just lightly pedaling. For me, this also calms me and allows me to regroup. I usually get up off the saddle after this and pedal back up to a comfortable speed.

Pick out point along your path and try and sprint to a point out in front of you. Try and remember where you do this so you can repeat this on other rides.

Try and anticipate your shifts to match with the terrain. Shift when you need too and try and keep your pedal speed up and allow your foward speed to drop a little. It's better to keep your pedal cadence up at this point than your overall speed.

Good Luck with your Challenge!

Chris
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