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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

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Old 07-24-07, 05:12 PM   #1
jdoff
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GT MTB "Hybridization"

(My tale of "woe" started in an older thread. Maybe this isn't the best forum to continue in, but I'm new here. )

Phase I of the conversion of my GT MTB to a more road-worthy fitness bike is complete.

Before:

After:

Okay, I guess "Phase I" is kind of monumental-sounding for a simple fork swap. But I did get a new cable housing for the rear derailleur, if that makes it any more monmuental.

At any rate, I went for a short ride after picking it up from the LBS tonight, and the new fork is noticably lighter (in my head, anyway). More importantly, I feel like I'm getting more power down when cranking up hills, and putting less power into bouncing up and down on a front suspension. In all, I'm happy with the new fork.

Oh, and now I can fit a fender if I (heaven forbid) decide to try commuting.

Phase II is a set of city tires (semi-slick with some puncture resistance), and Phase III is a new stem for a slightly more upright riding position.

Anyway, I wanted to check back in, since pictures were requested.
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Old 07-24-07, 05:18 PM   #2
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TRhe cheap planet bike clip on fenders work pretty well, especially for $10.00!
Quote:
Originally Posted by jdoff View Post
(My tale of "woe" started in an older thread. Maybe this isn't the best forum to continue in, but I'm new here. )

Phase I of the conversion of my GT MTB to a more road-worthy fitness bike is complete.

Before:

After:

Okay, I guess "Phase I" is kind of monumental-sounding for a simple fork swap. But I did get a new cable housing for the rear derailleur, if that makes it any more monmuental.

At any rate, I went for a short ride after picking it up from the LBS tonight, and the new fork is noticably lighter (in my head, anyway). More importantly, I feel like I'm getting more power down when cranking up hills, and putting less power into bouncing up and down on a front suspension. In all, I'm happy with the new fork.

Oh, and now I can fit a fender if I (heaven forbid) decide to try commuting.

Phase II is a set of city tires (semi-slick with some puncture resistance), and Phase III is a new stem for a slightly more upright riding position.

Anyway, I wanted to check back in, since pictures were requested.
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Old 07-24-07, 06:09 PM   #3
Bill Kapaun
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Street tires will make a world of difference!
I picked up a 5"? riser bar for my RockHopper at the LBS for $12. I have it tilted up & back to keep me upright as possible. I was able to get by without lengthening any cables, but barely. It appears you wouldn't have any problem, but YMMV.
I went with 1.5" tires (Serfas Drifter). They were readily available and my old pump was sufficient to get 60 PSI in them. A smaller tire would have meant a new pump. They also transmit much less vibration from rough textured pavement.
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Old 07-25-07, 07:12 AM   #4
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Street tires will make a world of difference!
I picked up a 5"? riser bar for my RockHopper at the LBS for $12. I have it tilted up & back to keep me upright as possible. I was able to get by without lengthening any cables, but barely. It appears you wouldn't have any problem, but YMMV.
I went with 1.5" tires (Serfas Drifter). They were readily available and my old pump was sufficient to get 60 PSI in them. A smaller tire would have meant a new pump. They also transmit much less vibration from rough textured pavement.
Yeah, I'm looking forward to getting the street tires on. I'm trying a set of 1.5-in Michelin Transworld City tires, which are rated to 90 PSI or so. I didn't think about the pump pressure issue, but I think my old Schwinn pump will handle it. If not, my air compressor can be conviced to hit 90 PSI or so.

The new fork has already improved the riding position a little bit, since it's the same height as the old FS, but doesn't compress at all when I get on it. I don't think I'll need a huge rise in the stem, but something a little shorter and higher will be a nice change. Now if I can just figure out when to hit my LBS at a non-busy time, so it's not a pain to try out a couple of different stems...
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Old 07-25-07, 07:28 AM   #5
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Looking Good! The Ricochet frame is a very good starting point. Does this bike have the compact gearing with a 42/32/22 triple? Might want to change that out to something like the Shimano LX Trekking Crank with a 48/38/? triple after you get the street slicks on it. Last years Octalinks are going for a very good price right now.

I wish the Maxxis Hookwork tires in the 26 inch had higher pressure like their 20x1.95's The made a very good tire for my 20/20 recumbent.

I went with a slight higher rise stem and then went with the Bontrager Sattelite handle bar that has the old MTB Bull horn look to them. This bar gives me a little flexibility and angle adjustment.

Nice Job on your bike!

Chris
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Old 07-25-07, 07:48 AM   #6
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Looking Good! The Ricochet frame is a very good starting point. Does this bike have the compact gearing with a 42/32/22 triple?
It has 22/32/44 gearing. I realize that it might be a limitation, but I'll wait until I have the road tires on to see. I can run out of gears as it is now (with the MTB tires on), but not frequently enough to worry about.

Swapping a crankset could get expensive, but if I can find a 48-tooth chainring that would fit on my crank, I'd try that.
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Old 07-25-07, 07:24 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jdoff View Post
(My tale of "woe" started in an older thread. Maybe this isn't the best forum to continue in, but I'm new here. )

Phase I of the conversion of my GT MTB to a more road-worthy fitness bike is complete.

Before:

After:

Okay, I guess "Phase I" is kind of monumental-sounding for a simple fork swap. But I did get a new cable housing for the rear derailleur, if that makes it any more monmuental.

At any rate, I went for a short ride after picking it up from the LBS tonight, and the new fork is noticably lighter (in my head, anyway). More importantly, I feel like I'm getting more power down when cranking up hills, and putting less power into bouncing up and down on a front suspension. In all, I'm happy with the new fork.

Oh, and now I can fit a fender if I (heaven forbid) decide to try commuting.

Phase II is a set of city tires (semi-slick with some puncture resistance), and Phase III is a new stem for a slightly more upright riding position.

Anyway, I wanted to check back in, since pictures were requested.
Slick tires are a definite advantage, plastic fenders can be had for a song these days, if you don't like black, there are paints that will work on plastic, I will probably leave mine though, since there is already black on the bike. a couple of strips of that reflective tape they use on trucks, on the back of the fender gives extra reflection, you can always cut to size. A rack is also a good idea, hopefully your new fork has rack and fender mounts...... I will be doing a fork swap next year, and also would like to do the crank.

Depending on the age of the bike, you can sometimes save money with experienced parts, rather then always new ones. A crank is a fairly simple set of parts, if the rings are in good condition, you might save half the cost of a new one. If you can swap rings on your current one, even better, as the rings themselves are fairly inexpensive. I'm looking for a 2-3 year old 48/36/26 crank myself.
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Old 07-25-07, 10:44 PM   #8
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omg, get some new tires!
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