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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

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Old 08-07-07, 12:38 PM   #1
bdkbrown
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Looking for a good multi-purpose Clyde bike.

I'm new to this forum and fairly new to cycling, and am 6'4" 240.

I'm looking for a good commuter that is comfortable enough to ride for fun on a local bike path, and efficient enough to ride to work on the road. I would also like a bike that I could use to do some touring (just to begin, if it's something I get into I could upgrade to a full touring bike when I can afford it.) As of right now, I prefer a more upright position, below are the bikes I've narrowed my choice to (and have ridden at my LBS.) Is one of these bikes better for Clydes, or a better value in general? (I don't know enough about components to judge.) I'm on a budget (around $500) but don't know enough to feel comfortable buying a used bike. I currently ride an old Raleigh M30 mountain bike.

Giant Cypress DX--Nice ride, comfortable. I don't know if I need the front shock. The disc breaks might make it hard to attach racks.

Giant FCR3--really liked the ride and it was a step (or turn?) faster. Could I attach a more plush seat?

Trek 7300--About the same as the Giant. But I can't judge components.

Trek 7.2FX--Again with the components, I like the suspension seat post on this one (which the FCR3 doesn't have.)

Also, I saw online that Giant makes a Tran Send commuter, but my LBS didn't have one to ride. I think it looks like a Cypress without front suspension and disc breaks. Any feedback or advice would be helpful. Thanks.

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Old 08-07-07, 12:44 PM   #2
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Any of these are nice, but forget the suspension seat post, as you'll find it really detracts from cycling. Every one of us that had one has replaced it with a nonsuspension post or is planning to. It makes getting the saddle height correct difficult.

Instead, look at a saddle like the Brooks Conquest or B-67 or the like, with spring set in the back, you'll be a lot happier, as well as a pair of padded shorts. The padding is better in the shorts than on the saddle, believe it or not!



Rigid forks are also a plus, unless you're going offroad and riding singletrack. On pavement, all it'l do is add weight and suck up your pedal stroke power and be another part to break.
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Old 08-07-07, 12:58 PM   #3
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Thanks. Is a rigid fork O.K. for a big guy to use on rough pavement with potholes, or over a bike path where stumps have cracked the cement? I'm not going "off-road" but some of the roads I ride on are less than perfect.
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Old 08-07-07, 01:04 PM   #4
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Thanks. Is a rigid fork O.K. for a big guy to use on rough pavement with potholes, or over a bike path where stumps have cracked the cement? I'm not going "off-road" but some of the roads I ride on are less than perfect.
Sure, I ride a aluminum frame and rigid carbon fiber fork and I'm 310lbs. I ride on the rural roads here in MN that are pretty beat up.
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Old 08-07-07, 01:11 PM   #5
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Yep, you just learn to "Unweight the Bike", through shifting your weight to ease the shock, ot just avoid the obstacles and holes entirely.
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Old 08-07-07, 01:12 PM   #6
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I'm 6'3 315 and I ride a rigid fork as well with a nonsuspension post. It might take a little longer to get used to, but you'll be happier in the long run. The roads i ride aren't rediculously bad, but i do spend a fair amount of time on cracked concrete pavement and riding over potholes as well as some time on tree root cracked pavement.
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Old 08-07-07, 01:24 PM   #7
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Absolutely forget that $#%*@! floating seatpost! They are ok "for a while" but your butt will love you once you go to a sprung Brooks saddle! I'm 6'7" 280# , so I can attest....
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Old 08-07-07, 01:38 PM   #8
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Unless it is a High End Suspension fork and you need it for off-road work, I tell folks to stay with the rigid fork to be sure. If you need added comfort, by all means look for a carbon front fork as a replacement.

At 255 lbs My STEEL frame MTB with the CARBON front fork works very well for me. Very positive handling and not too jarring a ride at all.

Brooks B-17 rider here!
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Old 08-07-07, 06:25 PM   #9
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Thanks for the advice. I think I'll probably go with a rigid fork, then.
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Old 08-07-07, 07:14 PM   #10
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Thanks for the advice. I think I'll probably go with a rigid fork, then.
Smart move. Delete the suspension seat post too, get a bike with a lot of spokes on the factory wheels (28 min, 32 better, 36 best) a wide gear range with a triple chainring crankset, 700 x 28 or so tires and you are good to go. At the first tuneup, specifically ask the shop to stress relieve and retension the spokes on the wheels, you will very likely have much less trouble with your wheels if you can get them to actually do that correctly. You are looking at some darn decent bikes. Good luck.
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Old 08-07-07, 07:24 PM   #11
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Unless it is a High End Suspension fork and you need it for off-road work, I tell folks to stay with the rigid fork to be sure. If you need added comfort, by all means look for a carbon front fork as a replacement.

At 255 lbs My STEEL frame MTB with the CARBON front fork works very well for me. Very positive handling and not too jarring a ride at all.

Brooks B-17 rider here!
Do they make a rigid carbon fork, that is a drop in replacement for a suspension fork? If so, made by whom, and what model(s). I would like to dump the 80mm suspension fork on my bike, and since, these days, I am so close to the Clyde limit, ( 97kg at last check), I would consider CF, providing it's inexpensive enough (side benefit, I could get the bars up a little).
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Old 08-07-07, 08:09 PM   #12
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Yes, they make CF forks that will fit practically any bike out there, made by many manufacturers in many different models. Figure out what you need for your bike and head on over to E-bay, if you dare. Son Chris replaced the front fork on his RockHopper with a CF rigid fork, on the way to converting it to a "RoadHopper" with 700 C wheels, Avid BB7 disc brakes and a new 52-42-30 triple crank.
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Old 08-07-07, 08:52 PM   #13
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Yes, they make CF forks that will fit practically any bike out there, made by many manufacturers in many different models. Figure out what you need for your bike and head on over to E-bay, if you dare. Son Chris replaced the front fork on his RockHopper with a CF rigid fork, on the way to converting it to a "RoadHopper" with 700 C wheels, Avid BB7 disc brakes and a new 52-42-30 triple crank.
Problem is, there are about 65.536 different models out there, and I am not sure, even what to look for.....
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Old 08-07-07, 08:59 PM   #14
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Old 08-07-07, 09:06 PM   #15
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Hey now not so fast with the "forget the suspension seat post" stuff. I guess I'm one of the few that took off my Thudbuster when I bought my Brooks and put in back a few months later. I just completed a 300 mile tour and loved having the Thudbuster under my butt. ( I not so in love with the Brooks). I agree a cheap suspension seat post is worthless but a Thudbuster with the correct elstomers (a purple and a black) is a magic carpet ride.
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Old 08-08-07, 05:11 AM   #16
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As far as basic bikes, take a look at Cross style bikes. I found them more comfortable than other styles. Go to the bike store and ask about Surly Cross-check or other cross bikes.
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Old 08-08-07, 05:57 AM   #17
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I'm new to this forum and fairly new to cycling, and am 6'4" 240.

I'm looking for a good commuter that is comfortable enough to ride for fun on a local bike path, and efficient enough to ride to work on the road. I would also like a bike that I could use to do some touring (just to begin, if it's something I get into I could upgrade to a full touring bike when I can afford it.) As of right now, I prefer a more upright position, below are the bikes I've narrowed my choice to (and have ridden at my LBS.) Is one of these bikes better for Clydes, or a better value in general? (I don't know enough about components to judge.) I'm on a budget (around $500) but don't know enough to feel comfortable buying a used bike. I currently ride an old Raleigh M30 mountain bike.

Giant Cypress DX--Nice ride, comfortable. I don't know if I need the front shock. The disc breaks might make it hard to attach racks.

Giant FCR3--really liked the ride and it was a step (or turn?) faster. Could I attach a more plush seat?

Trek 7300--About the same as the Giant. But I can't judge components.

Trek 7.2FX--Again with the components, I like the suspension seat post on this one (which the FCR3 doesn't have.)

Also, I saw online that Giant makes a Tran Send commuter, but my LBS didn't have one to ride. I think it looks like a Cypress without front suspension and disc breaks. Any feedback or advice would be helpful. Thanks.

bdkbrown
I rented a Giant Cypress during my vacation in Cleveland, Ohio, in May. It's a nice bike for a flat city, and I enjoyed riding it in rush hour traffic. (I live in farm country, so riding in urban traffic is a treat for me.) With only seven gears, I didn't think it suitable for hills.

I strongly suggest replacing any suspension seatpost on any bike you buy. The bouncing compromises your pedal stroke. Also, if you have hills to climb, get a triple gear.
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