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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

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Old 08-16-07, 08:43 AM   #76
Neil_B
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I actually think it's more liberation than power. Power over my own image yes, but it is liberating to know that I have the knowledge and ability to do it, as well as the desire to put it into action.
You are right. The power was already present. You and I just needed to liberate it.
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Old 08-16-07, 12:59 PM   #77
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Progress comes in varying forms

Hi J,
It sounds to me like you are making admirable progress if you are losing waist sizes - even in light of seeing no weight loss. I have experienced this same phenomenon as well. I don't know what else you do for fitness, but it sounds to me like you have a natural ability to build muscle quickly, like I do. Even with no weight training for the last two years, I have managed to maintain nearly all the muscle mass that I built as a powerlifter. Much of this is because I have to climb a LOT of hills. But I have also maintained the mass in my arms. I have seen very little weight loss in a long time, but I have seen a lot of change in my body shape. So keep up the effort, stick with what you know is right, and keep riding. I hope this will be an encouragement to you.
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Old 08-16-07, 02:57 PM   #78
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Wow. Full contact posting. Okay...I'm going to respond to Historian, but this is not meant in any way to be taken as a dig or further chest-thumping or other male vertibrate dominance behavior.

I still believe that people can have different set points for weight. It depends a lot on your genetics and on what your physical activity of choice is. Not just whether or not you exercise, but what you do when you exercise. Marathon racers are not always born as lean as they become after years of racing. They get that small because it is the most efficient way for their bodies to do that activity. Likewise, there are not that many power lifters that bench press over 500 lbs that weigh under 270 lbs or so (it happens, but is rare). I've known people from both sports that have around 10% body fat, but have a 100+ pound weight difference between them (but most power lifters find it hard to get below 12-13% body fat). The combination of your personal genetics, activity choices, what you eat, etc. will determine your "set point". If you significantly change the type of exercise that you do, then your body will change accordingly to a new one.

I seriously disagree that losing weight and keeping it off is as simple as you make it sound for a vast majority of people. I've lost a lot of weight before, and gained it all and then some back over the period of a couple of years. I've personally known hundreds of people that have had the same problem. Losing weight is not the problem for many. Keeping it off FOREVER is the hard part. But what do I know? I know that you've lost 145 lbs, but I lost about 180 lbs, and kept it all off for over a year so far. I know that would sound more convincing if I had kept it off for 5 or more years, but this time has been the easiest for me maintenance-wise.

Maybe "just eat less and exercise more" and "use common sense" works for some people. For those of us that have emotional issues with food, that just won't work. Maybe we are too sensitive, and need to be mentally hand-held and brainwashed to be successful? Maybe so. But I'd rather be alive and doing what I want to do with my non-macho emotional self, than trying to be something that I'm not. No John Wayne here. Sorry. Is there room on this forum for us overweight versions of Woody Allen or Jimmy Stewart that also like to bicycle? I hope so.
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Old 08-16-07, 03:23 PM   #79
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Wow. Full contact posting. Okay...I'm going to respond to Historian, but this is not meant in any way to be taken as a dig or further chest-thumping or other male vertibrate dominance behavior.
Please. Such restraint is welcome.

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Originally Posted by Pinyon View Post
I still believe that people can have different set points for weight. It depends a lot on your genetics and on what your physical activity of choice is. Not just whether or not you exercise, but what you do when you exercise. Marathon racers are not always born as lean as they become after years of racing. They get that small because it is the most efficient way for their bodies to do that activity. Likewise, there are not that many power lifters that bench press over 500 lbs that weigh under 270 lbs or so (it happens, but is rare). I've known people from both sports that have around 10% body fat, but have a 100+ pound weight difference between them (but most power lifters find it hard to get below 12-13% body fat). The combination of your personal genetics, activity choices, what you eat, etc. will determine your "set point". If you significantly change the type of exercise that you do, then your body will change accordingly to a new one.
Again agreeing with my post.

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I seriously disagree that losing weight and keeping it off is as simple as you make it sound for a vast majority of people.


I don't recall I've ever said it was simple. The math is simple. But so is algebra, and many folks, including me, can't do that.

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I've lost a lot of weight before, and gained it all and then some back over the period of a couple of years. I've personally known hundreds of people that have had the same problem. Losing weight is not the problem for many. Keeping it off FOREVER is the hard part. But what do I know? I know that you've lost 145 lbs, but I lost about 180 lbs, and kept it all off for over a year so far. I know that would sound more convincing if I had kept it off for 5 or more years, but this time has been the easiest for me maintenance-wise.
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I wasn't trying to get into a "anything you can lose, I can lose more of" contest. I addressed your comment that people here didn't understand what was involved with weight loss. That does appear to be the source of my problems in the forum lately. Silly me keeps responding to what people write, instead of something else.

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Originally Posted by Pinyon View Post
Maybe "just eat less and exercise more" and "use common sense" works for some people. For those of us that have emotional issues with food, that just won't work. Maybe we are too sensitive, and need to be mentally hand-held and brainwashed to be successful? Maybe so. But I'd rather be alive and doing what I want to do with my non-macho emotional self, than trying to be something that I'm not. No John Wayne here. Sorry. Is there room on this forum for us overweight versions of Woody Allen or Jimmy Stewart that also like to bicycle? I hope so.
The Jimmy Stewart of Harvey, or the Jimmy Stewart of Vertigo? :-) As for John Wayne, Uncadan has that one covered - he reminded me of the Duke the first time I met him.
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Old 08-16-07, 03:25 PM   #80
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Good post, Pinyon. Balance is a needful thing in all aspects of life. Everyone has different needs. And excellent points about the body adapting to its primary activity.
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Old 08-16-07, 03:52 PM   #81
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Originally Posted by Pinyon View Post
Wow. Full contact posting. Okay...I'm going to respond to Historian, but this is not meant in any way to be taken as a dig or further chest-thumping or other male vertibrate dominance behavior.

I still believe that people can have different set points for weight. It depends a lot on your genetics and on what your physical activity of choice is. Not just whether or not you exercise, but what you do when you exercise. Marathon racers are not always born as lean as they become after years of racing. They get that small because it is the most efficient way for their bodies to do that activity. Likewise, there are not that many power lifters that bench press over 500 lbs that weigh under 270 lbs or so (it happens, but is rare). I've known people from both sports that have around 10% body fat, but have a 100+ pound weight difference between them (but most power lifters find it hard to get below 12-13% body fat). The combination of your personal genetics, activity choices, what you eat, etc. will determine your "set point". If you significantly change the type of exercise that you do, then your body will change accordingly to a new one.

I seriously disagree that losing weight and keeping it off is as simple as you make it sound for a vast majority of people. I've lost a lot of weight before, and gained it all and then some back over the period of a couple of years. I've personally known hundreds of people that have had the same problem. Losing weight is not the problem for many. Keeping it off FOREVER is the hard part. But what do I know? I know that you've lost 145 lbs, but I lost about 180 lbs, and kept it all off for over a year so far. I know that would sound more convincing if I had kept it off for 5 or more years, but this time has been the easiest for me maintenance-wise.

Maybe "just eat less and exercise more" and "use common sense" works for some people. For those of us that have emotional issues with food, that just won't work. Maybe we are too sensitive, and need to be mentally hand-held and brainwashed to be successful? Maybe so. But I'd rather be alive and doing what I want to do with my non-macho emotional self, than trying to be something that I'm not. No John Wayne here. Sorry. Is there room on this forum for us overweight versions of Woody Allen or Jimmy Stewart that also like to bicycle? I hope so.
That was a great post, Pinyon.

Fighting weight loss like it were a WWII battle is great if that's how you get motivated. But there are many of us who have different personalities and different techniques.

To be honest, I don't care what someone believes about why they're heavy. If they're on a bike, and they were or are fat, then it's all good. Even if they haven't lost weight in a while. Keep biking, keep trying. The body is a strange beast sometimes. And the body/mind combination is unfathomable at times.
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Old 08-16-07, 04:58 PM   #82
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Yeah, Solveg...I ride because I love it. It does not have that much to do with my weight, really, except that if I rode less, I would eat less too. But I don't ride so that I can eat more and get away with it. I ride because...I feel like...I was born to do it. The combination of exertion, the freedom, wind in my face, etc. If I was a lot bigger than I am now, I would still ride.
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Old 08-16-07, 06:29 PM   #83
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Yeah, Solveg...I ride because I love it. It does not have that much to do with my weight, really, except that if I rode less, I would eat less too. But I don't ride so that I can eat more and get away with it. I ride because...I feel like...I was born to do it. The combination of exertion, the freedom, wind in my face, etc. If I was a lot bigger than I am now, I would still ride.
you know really that is the truth with me as well, I've ridden for over 14 years, I ride because I love it, I ride for the fun. Personally I would rather ride my bike (MTB or road) than drive my car .
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Old 08-16-07, 08:12 PM   #84
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I'm sorry, but I'm at work and don't have time to respond to this interesting conversation. One point of clarification: Gina Kolata does NOT use the term "set point" in her book, Rethinking Thin. I used the term, and most likely misused it. I'm sorry if I sent anybody down the wrong path by this.

I can't reccommend her book too highly. i think it's important to use the biological science (and every other tool) to help in the struggle for good mental and physical health.
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