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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

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Old 09-21-07, 09:19 AM   #1
b_young
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Help on Fundraiser organization.

My son is type 1 diabetic. We found out about a year and a half ago. He is now to the point that we are getting an insulin pump. There is a new one that has a monitor that communicates with it. It updates and adjust insulin every 5 sec. The problem is that insurance will only pay 80% pump cost and 0% glucose monitor. I am left with $2500 bill.
I am thinking of trying to get sponsors and doing a ride across the state. If I have money above the pump cost I will be putting it to the Tour de Cure.
Is this okay? I haven't been involved with many fundraisers other than just donations and rides. Can you do this as an individual? I make a decent salary, but it seems like it is a never ending medical expense. Work has me back in school, which means the 400+ hrs of OT went away.
I am not trying to be a whine bag, I just want to see if I can get some relief and do something I like.
Any suggestions?
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Old 09-21-07, 01:26 PM   #2
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My wife is type 1 and we looked into that new pump, but much like a car, it's a first generation and decided to let them work the kinks out of them and check back into it when gen 2 comes around. How old is your son and what pump are you currently using? You might want to check with your local Diabetes Assoc office to see if there are any kind of fund available through foundations to help offset the cost. Good luck.
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Old 09-21-07, 01:34 PM   #3
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+1 on ADA.

Another route would be "Just Give".
http://www.justgive.org/

They might be able to help you figure out a fundraiser.

Beware though of taxes
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Old 09-21-07, 09:18 PM   #4
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Thanks, I will check with the ADA. He is 9 yrs old. We do not currently have a pump. He has 1 shot at 9pm that sets his base line and then a shot to cover each meal. This link is the pump we ordered today. http://www.minimed.com/products/insulinpumps/It is as close to an artificial pancreas as you can get. It does require to insertions under the skin. The needle is small and wasn't a problem on our test unit. The monitor has to be moved every 6 days and the pump every 3 days. The only negative I have heard of so far is that the insertion for the monitor has caused some scaring. If that is the case we will stop using it. It is a big investment so I hope it is worth it. My son is worth much, more so if it isn't all we think it is, then we will just be out a little.
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Old 09-21-07, 09:51 PM   #5
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Thanks, I will check with the ADA. He is 9 yrs old. We do not currently have a pump. He has 1 shot at 9pm that sets his base line and then a shot to cover each meal. This link is the pump we ordered today. http://www.minimed.com/products/insulinpumps/It is as close to an artificial pancreas as you can get. It does require to insertions under the skin. The needle is small and wasn't a problem on our test unit. The monitor has to be moved every 6 days and the pump every 3 days. The only negative I have heard of so far is that the insertion for the monitor has caused some scaring. If that is the case we will stop using it. It is a big investment so I hope it is worth it. My son is worth much, more so if it isn't all we think it is, then we will just be out a little.
Ah yes, the mini-med. My wife used one of those for 3 years or so, but she moved to an Animas pump about 4 years ago and likes it a little better. She gotten to the point to where she does not even have to use the numbing agent on her skin to insert the needle. The pumps are really a great enhancement over the shots. She also was diagnosed at age 9 and is 40 now. She watches her sugar levels quite good, but I have learn to recognize the signs of high or low sugar before she feels them on occasion. I hope you have gotten him a medical alert bracelet or chain and get him the habit of carrying some form of glucose tablets of gel. I can tell you story a-plenty on low sugar and the helplessness I felt on occasion when she got really stubborn about taking the glucose tablets. I have gotten her doctor to write scripts for Glucogon (spelling might be off) in case I have a hard time getting her to cooperate, so now I can just mix the vials and give her a shot and about 20 mins later she will come around. Watch for sign of heavy sweating when they are not doing any real activity as that is a clear sign of low sugar. When they come back around, they will get really cold.

Since I don't know your whole situation, I am going on the assumption you might not have dealt with Diabetes before, so if I am wrong I apologize. I can only assume you are feeling like I do sometimes in that you are probably more scared about this than he is. Get yourself educated on anything and everything so that you know exactly what to do and how everything works. For a long time, I had no idea how to set her glucose meter, but the meters are pretty fool proof now, so that a non issue.

Again, good luck and PM if you have any questions or concerns.
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Old 09-22-07, 05:03 PM   #6
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We tried to get him excited about it as much as we could right after we found out. So he has a med bracelet and a small backpack with supplies that he carries everywhere. He will talk to anyone and everyone about his diabetes. There are a few other kids in our church that are type 1, they were a little shy about letting anyone know. Timothy has got them to all wear their med bracelets and not be embarrassed anymore.
This pump we ordered has a smaller needle setup for kids. At least on the trial pump he never needed any numbing agent. Hopefullly that wont change.
Does your wife use the monitor that you insert in the skin too? It is suppose to sample and update the pump every 5 sec. to me that is amazing.
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Old 09-22-07, 05:38 PM   #7
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No monitor on hers, the last pump came out before those. I can see that type being used for a kid. It probably a great option until the can learn how they are feeling and get a hold on eating and dispensing the right dosage amounts. My wife is never been a fan of letting people know either, as she does not want them to treat her differently or make a fuss as she says. I say bullocks to that and let people know so if you are having issues, they don't think your on drugs or drunk. I took me getting her a very nice gold bracelet to even have her wear that. I'd be interested in the success or trials you have with this pump so in the future if we opt that way, we can have ideas on what to look for.
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