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  1. #1
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    I've bought myself a bike and I'm having fun

    I bought my first bike. After riding a bunch of road bikes and hybrids at the local bike shop, I concluded that I really need the more upright seating position and flat bars of a hybrid for now. I much prefer the look and speed potential of the drop-handled road bikes, but my immediate comfort, the limits of my current state of fitness, and brutal honesty with myself about what will really enable me to keep riding long enough for fitness cycling to become a habit won out over cool factor.

    I got a 2007 Trek 7.7 FX. It seems like a road-oriented hybrid with 700x28c tires, lightweight aluminum frame with carbon forks and seat stay (if that's what you call the part that goes from down from the seat to the rear wheel), Shimano Ultegra dérailleur, Shimano 105 triple-crank. I'm not sure what kind of Shimano shifters it has; I don't see a model number on them. And the guy at the bike shop swears my 267 pounds won't break the carbon parts.

    I do suspect that the single-position handle-bar may become tiresome on long rides, but I'm a long way from going on long rides, so I won't worry about that for now. Also, I plan on building another bike, probably based on a Surly LHT frame, for long rides and/or commuting and/or utility uses. Maybe I'll even try some touring at some point. (I wonder if I can carry an 8x10 camera, film holders, and a tripod on that Surly?) But I think right now that the Trek 7.7 FX will get me started on the cycling addiction, and it'll end up being my daily rider and fitness cycle, and maybe short trip group-ride bike.

    I bought a helmet and some gloves and a seat bag and tubes and tools and repair stuff, and I went to a class so I could learn how to do simple cycle maintenance and fix a flat. The neatest thing I did was to get some Specialized clipon mountain bike shoes and have a set of Shimano PD-M250 SPD pedals installed on my Trek. They were a little odd feeling at first, but I liked them after spending an hour clipping in and out while riding up and down my street. They make it easy to pedal efficiently and they help me feel very secure on the bike while riding.

    I mapped out a 2.5 mile course through the neighborhood. It has some very mild elevation changes but most people would probably say it is flat. Even so, I feel it when I'm going uphill, gradual or not. I'm sad to say that one 2.5 mile loop completely wears me out and makes my legs really sore. *pant* *pant* . But, I'M HAPPY, and I'm sure I'll be able to double then triple my distance before long.

    Here's to cycling, fitness, and weight loss (lifts a beer)!

  2. #2
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    Stay with it--I could only ride about 300 yards without being out of breath when I started a couple of months ago. I am riding six miles per day now and nor even getting winded. I am taking off tomorrow to see what ten miles feels like.

    You are doing it right--my advice is minimal but echoes what everyone told me when I started--try to ride every day--it really changes you quickly.

    Good luck and keep this reading this forum--the folks here are really great.

  3. #3
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    Congrats on the new bike

  4. #4
    Senior Member Kazzy's Avatar
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    I'm glad you're having fun. That really is the important part. It'll keep you motivated to go out again and again. Just go a little farther every 2 or 3 days or so. Before long you'll be racking up the miles! I started out slow too. But it was fun, so I kept going and going.

  5. #5
    On my TARDIScycle! KingTermite's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by okra dictum View Post
    I bought my first bike. After riding a bunch of road bikes and hybrids at the local bike shop, I concluded that I really need the more upright seating position and flat bars of a hybrid for now. I much prefer the look and speed potential of the drop-handled road bikes, but my immediate comfort, the limits of my current state of fitness, and brutal honesty with myself about what will really enable me to keep riding long enough for fitness cycling to become a habit won out over cool factor.

    I got a 2007 Trek 7.7 FX. It seems like a road-oriented hybrid with 700x28c tires, lightweight aluminum frame with carbon forks and seat stay (if that's what you call the part that goes from down from the seat to the rear wheel), Shimano Ultegra dérailleur, Shimano 105 triple-crank. I'm not sure what kind of Shimano shifters it has; I don't see a model number on them. And the guy at the bike shop swears my 267 pounds won't break the carbon parts.

    I do suspect that the single-position handle-bar may become tiresome on long rides, but I'm a long way from going on long rides, so I won't worry about that for now. Also, I plan on building another bike, probably based on a Surly LHT frame, for long rides and/or commuting and/or utility uses. Maybe I'll even try some touring at some point. (I wonder if I can carry an 8x10 camera, film holders, and a tripod on that Surly?) But I think right now that the Trek 7.7 FX will get me started on the cycling addiction, and it'll end up being my daily rider and fitness cycle, and maybe short trip group-ride bike.

    I bought a helmet and some gloves and a seat bag and tubes and tools and repair stuff, and I went to a class so I could learn how to do simple cycle maintenance and fix a flat. The neatest thing I did was to get some Specialized clipon mountain bike shoes and have a set of Shimano PD-M250 SPD pedals installed on my Trek. They were a little odd feeling at first, but I liked them after spending an hour clipping in and out while riding up and down my street. They make it easy to pedal efficiently and they help me feel very secure on the bike while riding.

    I mapped out a 2.5 mile course through the neighborhood. It has some very mild elevation changes but most people would probably say it is flat. Even so, I feel it when I'm going uphill, gradual or not. I'm sad to say that one 2.5 mile loop completely wears me out and makes my legs really sore. *pant* *pant* . But, I'M HAPPY, and I'm sure I'll be able to double then triple my distance before long.

    Here's to cycling, fitness, and weight loss (lifts a beer)!
    You sound exactly like me when I started. I got a "comfort" bike for my first bike. The handlebars aren't that bad, but as you get to the long rides and need more hand positions, just get bar ends. That will help quite a bit.

    As far as carbon bikes....I was told by my bike shop that I was OK on carbon too...and this was when (still am) over 300 pounds. I'm considering a possible carbon frame for next bike, but I won't worry about it "right this minute".





    Aside from all this, your title was the most important part of your post.
    I've bought myself a bike and I'm having fun
    Quote Originally Posted by coffeecake View Post
    - it's pretty well established that Hitler was an *******.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Bill Kapaun's Avatar
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    " I bought a helmet and some gloves and a seat bag and tubes and tools and repair stuff, and I went to a class so I could learn how to do simple cycle maintenance and fix a flat."
    SMART!

    "I'm sad to say that one 2.5 mile loop completely wears me out and makes my legs really sore."
    You don't want to get REALLY sore! Go easy at first. It'll surprise you how fast your legs will get in shape. Just don't make them angry!

  7. #7
    Gorntastic! v1k1ng1001's Avatar
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    Glad to have you on board.

  8. #8
    Senior Member ilmooz's Avatar
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    Congratulations on your new bike. It's a good choice, it's outfitted with good components, and it should prove to be plenty durable, reliable, and enjoyable.

    I think you'll probably find the flat bar comfortable all the time. The only instance where you might be wishing for a different (lower) position is when you're riding into a strong headwind.

  9. #9
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    Thank you all for the encouragement. I can't wait to go ride some more, but I'll wait until tomorrow morning. I plan to hold my enthusiasm in check and ease into the regimen with a single daily ride each morning so I don't overdo it while I'm getting reacquainted with muscles that I'd forgotten I had.

    I took a picture of myself so I can post in the "before and after" thread once I've made enough progress to warrant it. My hope is that daily cycling combined with my new low-carb, low-fat, low-cholesterol diet will start to make a difference before long.

  10. #10
    This Space For Rent Stujoe's Avatar
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    Sounds like you have a great bike and a great attitude to match it. Have fun!

  11. #11
    My cassette goes to 11 Barabus's Avatar
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    Rode 40 miles last weekend with my wife, both of us on our trek 7.3fx's. I have a road bike too, but prefer the trek hybrid for the majority of the rides. We have done about 60-70 miles per week on ours for the last three months.

    Get some bar ends and your hands will be happier. Note, I really changed around my handle bars. Turned the rise down instead of up, used compressed air to move the grips around and down since my hands were crowded and moved the shifters and brakes around too.

  12. #12
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    Bar-ends... a couple of people have mentioned them. Something like these? http://www.bikepro.com/products/bare...s_answer.shtml

    I think I'm fine with the way my handlebars are right now, but it's always nice to know about possible worthwhile customizations. In what orientation are they normally mounted? Anyone got any pics?

  13. #13
    The Site Administrator: Currently at home recovering from a couple of strokes,please contact my assistnt admins for forum issues Tom Stormcrowe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by okra dictum View Post
    Bar-ends... a couple of people have mentioned them. Something like these? http://www.bikepro.com/products/bare...s_answer.shtml

    I think I'm fine with the way my handlebars are right now, but it's always nice to know about possible worthwhile customizations. In what orientation are they normally mounted? Anyone got any pics?
    Mounted at an angle similar to the hoods for the brake levers on drop handlebars. That duplicates the hand angle where the palms face each other that make riding on the tops of drop bars so comfortable.
    on light duty due to illness; please contact my assistants for forum issues. They are Siu Blue Wind, or CbadRider or the other 3 star folk. I am currently at home recovering from a couple of strokes. I am making good progress, happily.


    . “He who fights with monsters might take care lest he thereby become a monster. And if you gaze for long into an abyss, the abyss gazes also into you.”- Fredrick Nietzsche

    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." - Immanuel Kant

  14. #14
    Senior Member Wogster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by okra dictum View Post
    Maybe I'll even try some touring at some point. (I wonder if I can carry an 8x10 camera, film holders, and a tripod on that Surly?) But I think right now that the Trek 7.7 FX will get me started on the cycling addiction, and it'll end up being my daily rider and fitness cycle, and maybe short trip group-ride bike.
    I'm going to respond to the oddball section of your message, the camera part, as someone who has been seriously into photography for 30 years. I want to deal with the camera issue.

    For the benefit of the rest of the group an 8x10 camera is huge, it shoots on a sheet of film 8" x 10" in size, these are the uber clyde of the camera world, forget plastic, titanium and aluminum, the bodies are often wood, and the metal parts are solid steel. It's not uncommon for the camera alone to weigh 50lbs, the tripod to hold up a 50lb camera is also built pretty heavy duty, and tends to add 20-25lbs of it's own weight to the mix, film holders probably 2lbs a piece or so, given the price of the film (about $4 a sheet), and the fact that you get 2 shots per holder, it's likely that a whole days shooting is done with 2-3 holders, so not a lot of weight there.

    While you might be able to attach it to a bike, it will make hill climbing in anything other then your lowest gear a real drag, but there are also balance issues, the camera is too heavy for a pannier, although depending on how it comes apart, you might be able to put body on one side, bellows, lens, ground glass and film holders on the other side, and the tripod on the rack in the middle, but that adds all of the weight to the rear of the bike, and that makes hill climbing even more interesting, unless you have ballast on the front, to hold the front end down, even 20lbs of cat litter can unweight the front wheel enough to cause control issues. A 2 wheel trailer is probably your best bet, the trailer wheels carry most of the weight, you want a trailer with a hub mount, not a chain stay, seat stay or seat post mount.

    Honestly, I would leave the 8x10 at home, pick up a nice light modern DSLR a couple of lenses, and make that your bike camera, add a handle bar bag, and your good to go.

  15. #15
    Support JDRF b_young's Avatar
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    Congrats on the bike.
    "Yesterday is history, tomorrow is a mystery, but today is a gift that is why it is called the present." - Kung Fu Panda

    http://tickers.TickerFactory.com/ezt...1LG/weight.png

  16. #16
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    Thank you for your input on my camera comment Wogsterca! Even though my Deardorff is a bit lighter than you'd think (about 12.5 pounds without a holder), the film, holders, lenses, dark cloth, loupe, and other doodads add up. And then there is the tripod! A nice CF tripod would be a lot lighter than my wooden Ries, but it's still too much when you add it all up. And it takes up too much space, besides.

    A lightweight 4x5 kit based on a Toho FC-45X, a lightweight tripod, three compact lenses, and a Quickload/Readyload holder might actually be reasonable for touring. Otherwise, yeah, a lightweight 35mm rangefinder or a modest DSLR (eliminates the weight and bulk of film) is surely more practical.

  17. #17
    Junior Member Texas_Trek's Avatar
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    Is this a great community or what?!?

    I just joined BikeForums last night. Found this 200+ forum today, stopped at another bike store on my way home from work to broaden my choices before I buy and then found you guys tonight talking about getting started, getting in shape and talking photography. I could only be happier if my wife understood my desire to purchase a bike that costs more than $100.

    I'm 42, 6'3", 235. I have been riding my WalMart mountain bike for 3 years off and on but not regularly until recently. I joined karate to motivate my kids and the past three to four months I started riding more to help get in shape faster. Now, like you guys, I am loving the cycling world. I started slow too but I ride about 5 to 6 days a week and am now up to 24 miles. By the way, after 24 miles I lay down on my front lawn until I could get my breath back. That was rough.

    I think that I have decided on a 2007 Trek 1500 for $950. I looked at hybrids too. I looked at a lot of bikes. 7 bike shops and I don't remember how many models. Two friends talked me out of a hybrid because they both opted for a road bike after a year. Anyway, I have looked carefully, asked a bunch of questions, read a lot, flipped through brochure and taken some test drives. Saturday is the day. I cannot wait.

    I too am having fun my friend. Thanks for sharing.


    "To build true confidence through knowledge in the mind, honesty in the heart, and strength in the body."

  18. #18
    Senior Member Wogster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by okra dictum View Post
    Thank you for your input on my camera comment Wogsterca! Even though my Deardorff is a bit lighter than you'd think (about 12.5 pounds without a holder), the film, holders, lenses, dark cloth, loupe, and other doodads add up. And then there is the tripod! A nice CF tripod would be a lot lighter than my wooden Ries, but it's still too much when you add it all up. And it takes up too much space, besides.

    A lightweight 4x5 kit based on a Toho FC-45X, a lightweight tripod, three compact lenses, and a Quickload/Readyload holder might actually be reasonable for touring. Otherwise, yeah, a lightweight 35mm rangefinder or a modest DSLR (eliminates the weight and bulk of film) is surely more practical.
    The issue of camera weight, yes a digital eliminates the weight of film, and replaces it with batteries, on a tour where your staying in hotels and other places where you can get power, then spare battery and charger take up very little weight, typically 1/2lb or less. On a long tour where power supplies are not guaranteed, then the weight of batteries can add up.

  19. #19
    Gorntastic! v1k1ng1001's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Texas_Trek View Post
    I just joined BikeForums last night. Found this 200+ forum today, stopped at another bike store on my way home from work to broaden my choices before I buy and then found you guys tonight talking about getting started, getting in shape and talking photography. I could only be happier if my wife understood my desire to purchase a bike that costs more than $100.

    I'm 42, 6'3", 235. I have been riding my WalMart mountain bike for 3 years off and on but not regularly until recently. I joined karate to motivate my kids and the past three to four months I started riding more to help get in shape faster. Now, like you guys, I am loving the cycling world. I started slow too but I ride about 5 to 6 days a week and am now up to 24 miles. By the way, after 24 miles I lay down on my front lawn until I could get my breath back. That was rough.

    I think that I have decided on a 2007 Trek 1500 for $950. I looked at hybrids too. I looked at a lot of bikes. 7 bike shops and I don't remember how many models. Two friends talked me out of a hybrid because they both opted for a road bike after a year. Anyway, I have looked carefully, asked a bunch of questions, read a lot, flipped through brochure and taken some test drives. Saturday is the day. I cannot wait.

    I too am having fun my friend. Thanks for sharing.
    That rocks. 24 miles isn't very far on a modern road bike. Soon you'll be riding 60 milers.

  20. #20
    Senior Member BeckyW's Avatar
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    Congratulations! I started with a hybrid/comfort bike too, and I'm chomping at the bit (so to speak!) to get on a road/touring bike. I really think I need to lose a bit more of the gut first, though. And, no shame at all in being tired after 2.5 miles, first time out! That's waaaay more than many of us did, first ride. Be kind to your body, keep having fun, and you'll be touring in no time
    "You must do the thing you think you cannot do." - Eleanor Roosevelt

  21. #21
    Downtown Spanky Brown bautieri's Avatar
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    Okra

    Congratulations on the bike and finding the clydes in bikeforums. The clydes are without a doubt the most helpful bunch of people who genuinely help motivate you as well as take time from their days to give a complete and well thought out answer to just about anything you ask. The roadies and their off road counterparts tend to be a bit cranky. The best thing you can do is get out and ride. I too started with a 2 mile loop that almost killed me, a few months later and I've done 50 mile rides without much hassle. Remember, every cadence you make brings you one closer to your goals.

    Happy Riding,

    Bau

  22. #22
    Senior Mumbler steve2k's Avatar
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    Plenty of people on this forum carry lots of Camera equipment around.
    As far a I can tell there are a couple of professional photographers who only get about by bike, usually xtracycles.

    Clients wanted a photo on my xtracycle

    P.S. I know nothing about cameras so don't even know if it's possible with the camera you have, but I like the idea of getting around by bike and I like photos so thought I'd share this.

  23. #23
    Junior Member Texas_Trek's Avatar
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    I would love to see some great photos from the large formats that were taken while riding around. Maybe include the bike in your shot to inspire us.


    "To build true confidence through knowledge in the mind, honesty in the heart, and strength in the body."

  24. #24
    The Site Administrator: Currently at home recovering from a couple of strokes,please contact my assistnt admins for forum issues Tom Stormcrowe's Avatar
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    Same here!

    By the way, an idea......since you are into LF

    Do a spread for a gallery display. I'd be happy to help publicize it. Anything that mixes cycling in with it can be a great motivator Maybe do some Aamsesque landscapes that also feature cycling using Tech Pan being pushed or pulled! (I love technical pan film.....no set ISO!). I've done this medium format (120) and shot long exposures below ISO 25 and pushed it up as high as ISO 100 for night shots with long exposure and F Stops wide open.

    By the way, a used kid trailer makes a great cargo trailer for your camera and gear and is quite stable. I know what a Large Format camera costs!
    on light duty due to illness; please contact my assistants for forum issues. They are Siu Blue Wind, or CbadRider or the other 3 star folk. I am currently at home recovering from a couple of strokes. I am making good progress, happily.


    . “He who fights with monsters might take care lest he thereby become a monster. And if you gaze for long into an abyss, the abyss gazes also into you.”- Fredrick Nietzsche

    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." - Immanuel Kant

  25. #25
    Senior Member Wogster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Stormcrowe View Post
    Same here!

    By the way, an idea......since you are into LF

    Do a spread for a gallery display. I'd be happy to help publicize it. Anything that mixes cycling in with it can be a great motivator Maybe do some Aamsesque landscapes that also feature cycling using Tech Pan being pushed or pulled! (I love technical pan film.....no set ISO!). I've done this medium format (120) and shot long exposures below ISO 25 and pushed it up as high as ISO 100 for night shots with long exposure and F Stops wide open.

    By the way, a used kid trailer makes a great cargo trailer for your camera and gear and is quite stable. I know what a Large Format camera costs!
    For your information, Kodak in it's race to become largely another bit player in the digital market, discontinued tech pan a couple of years ago, much to the dismay of it's many fans!

    There are many other good B&W films around though, my favourite has always been Ilford's PanF it's rated 50ASA but I have pulled it to 25EV and pushed it to 100EV without any ill effects. BTW the proper term for altering film speed is EV for Exposure Valuation, as ASA and ISO are standards used to determine exposure valuation for a film, that meets certain standards. Often though, what the film manufacturer thinks is best, and what the photographer thinks is best are not the same. This extends to digital, my Rebel is permanently set to a 1/3 stop under exposed, as I like the look better.

    As for photography and cycling, they go together like peanut butter and jam, ice cream and chocolate sauce, beer and pizza, you get the idea. Lower speed and the ability to go anywhere without needing to drag the car around, are advantages when shooting.

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