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Thread: Road vs Mt bike

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    Senior Member dbikingman's Avatar
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    Road vs Mt bike

    Any advantage of one over the other when it comes to a clyde? Or is just a matter which one you will ride more. I currently have an old mt. bike, I keep thinking I want a road bike. I am getting ready to move and was talking a LBS owner who suggested I might want to give my mt bike another try. He says I will be close to trails where ever I choose to live, but in some areas the roads aren't too kind to roadies. They are old, rough and narrow.

    thanks

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    Senior Member late's Avatar
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    Hi,
    I Mtn biked in my Forties, but couldn't take the pounding when I got into my Fifties. I ride a road bike set up to have a pretty smooth ride. If you have rough roads, use big tires that can be run at low pressure.

    So I guess it all depends on you, if you just toodle down trails, either would be fine. If you ride hard enough to get thumped, maybe something different is a good idea.

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    I think it depends upon where you are moving and what you are planning and wanting to do. A cyclocross bike might be more helpful, as it can be a commuter, road, or trail bike, just change tires, gears or wheel sets to have what you need.
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    cycling n00b Black Shuck's Avatar
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    Look at touring bikes too if you want to get a new one. Fits wide tires and is built to be comfortable and very stable for long rides carrying heavier loads than your average roadie or mtb. Heavier than a roadbike, lighter than a mtb but will still handle well on both asphalt and moderate trails.

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    I am a clyde 235lbs(from over 250 in May), and ride a 12 YO Specialized Sport Rock. Not the smoothest or lightest ride in town, but it gets me where I want to go. 25 miles is no problem, but don't expect me to win a race on it. I plan on keeping the mountain bike as a commuter, but really want to be able to get in some local group rides. I have decided that a road bike is the answer, but want a triple. With just a few of the '07 models left in my LBS, all of which are doubles, I am waiting for an 08' triple. Hopefully the Trek 2.3 will fit as well as the 2100 does.
    Last edited by RKDNE; 10-14-07 at 09:29 PM.

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    Senior Member dbikingman's Avatar
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    I've got my eye on a used Trek 1500, that seems to have all I want for now. Just nervous about making the commitment.

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    I would think the opposite.

    Unless you live out on a gravel road somewhere you can always throw your road bike on the pavement and go for a long ride. Moutain biking is sometimes hard to come by.

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    Senior Member shumacher's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dbikingman View Post
    Any advantage of one over the other when it comes to a clyde? Or is just a matter which one you will ride more. I currently have an old mt. bike, I keep thinking I want a road bike. I am getting ready to move and was talking a LBS owner who suggested I might want to give my mt bike another try. He says I will be close to trails where ever I choose to live, but in some areas the roads aren't too kind to roadies. They are old, rough and narrow.

    thanks
    Who is this LBS? You have an old bike, and you're about to move, so you won't be a potential customer in the future. You came in wanting a road bike. These things all scream "sell me a bike today!" That the owner instead suggested you give a bike you already own another chance suggests this is a pretty decent shop. I'll be up there this summer, and might want to stop by a shop.

    I'd buy the bike for the surface on which I'd be riding predominately. Either can get by on the other's territory, but I'd say a mountain bike would be more at home on the road than a road bike would be in the mud. If you're really unsure, look at cross bikes, hybrids, and fitness bikes.

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    Draft Producer Fastflyingasian's Avatar
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    could do what i did. i bought a road bike since i really like the road. and my mountain bike stays as my mountain bike. actually i ended up putting on bigger better tires with more grip since i knew i wasnt going to ride road with that bike.

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    Might also look into a steel cyclocross bike. Probably the best 'do anything' bike for anyone, and quite forgiving on the rough stuff while still being pretty fast.

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    Senior Member breadbin's Avatar
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    Hi, I was in this situation a while back and I went for a road bike, well cyclocross to be exact. I was seriously thinking of a mtb but what made up my mind for me was the fact that the *road* bike is so much faster and easier to ride on the roads. I do most of my cycling on the roads, but I didn't want to turn into a weight weenie so now I have the best of both worlds.
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    Back after a long absence joelpalmer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by schnee View Post
    Might also look into a steel cyclocross bike. Probably the best 'do anything' bike for anyone, and quite forgiving on the rough stuff while still being pretty fast.
    +1 - some friends of mine got cyclocross bikes which they use for commuting and loaded touring, as well as weekend training/pleasure rides. If I hadn't fallen in love with the LHT the first time I saw one I'd probably have a 'cross bike. As it stands there is probably one in my future. A good mix of MTB toughness and roadie speed.
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    When I lived in E Texas we had a lot of trails to ride and I had a mountain bike .I liked it . Fast forward 15 years and I live in South Texas. No hilly trails no MB trails so I bought a Hybrid and I liked it fine. After riding my hybrid on roads for a year I bought a Trek 1500 for more speed on the roads and guess what-I like it. Gave MB to my son and kept the hybrid for piddling around and 10-20 mile rides . I ride the roady for exercise and longer rides. The speed is awesome when you have to ride before work and want to cover 12-15 miles in a short period time.

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    Mattynacks got a frame and had different wheelsets made up with all disc brakes. So he can go with his skinny Deep Vs up to his 2.5 (I think) mtb wheels in under a minute.

    There's a great discussion in my sig before the links that I think hits it - the best bike is the one you want to ride as long as possible and that will probably be a road bike.

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    Senior Member dbikingman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by shumacher View Post
    Who is this LBS? You have an old bike, and you're about to move, so you won't be a potential customer in the future. You came in wanting a road bike. These things all scream "sell me a bike today!" That the owner instead suggested you give a bike you already own another chance suggests this is a pretty decent shop. I'll be up there this summer, and might want to stop by a shop.

    I'd buy the bike for the surface on which I'd be riding predominately. Either can get by on the other's territory, but I'd say a mountain bike would be more at home on the road than a road bike would be in the mud. If you're really unsure, look at cross bikes, hybrids, and fitness bikes.
    Actually, the LBS is in the city where I am moving. I spend about 4 days there and 3 in my current residence. The advantage I have is the LBS employee use to live in my current city so he knows both locations. Of course he offered to sell me a new mtb.

    I trying to wait until I know where I am going to live and the re-evaluate what riding is the closest.

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    Senior Member rideorglide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dbikingman View Post
    Any advantage of one over the other when it comes to a clyde?thanks
    Once us clydes get rolling nicely on a well-lubed road bike, we have momentum going for us. It's nice to feel the effortless glide our power can produce on a road bike ... well at least up until that wind resistance begins to kick in, but hey...

    Personally, I think being a clyde roadie has a lot of benefits. Keeping pace with lightweights on hills will present mostly the same issues on a road bike as it will on an MTB. (Except you will get up hills faster on a lighter road bike. (although obviously not the same kind of hills;-))

    Quote Originally Posted by dbikingman View Post
    Or is just a matter which one you will ride more.
    Sometimes you don;t know what you are going to ride more, until you try it. I was a died-in-the-wool MTBer, but circumstances kept me close to home more often. I got a road bike and started to really love riding it.

    Quote Originally Posted by dbikingman View Post
    I currently have an old mt. bike,.
    Well in one way, you have that covered, so you have one argument right there for a road bike.


    Quote Originally Posted by dbikingman View Post
    I keep thinking I want a road bike.
    Listen to your inner voice. I've done this more than a few times in just these types of quests, and it hasn't let me down.

    Quote Originally Posted by dbikingman View Post
    I am getting ready to move and was talking a LBS owner who suggested I might want to give my mt bike another try.
    If you dig it, you can always upgrade, or trade up to a newer MTB. But don't let it stop you partaking of the pleasures of the road bike.

    Quote Originally Posted by dbikingman View Post
    in some areas the roads aren't too kind to roadies. They are old, rough and narrow.
    this can be true. I don;t know what kind of riding you have near you. For sure when you start road biking you will want to identify the safest riding routes near you first.

    Both Road biking and MTBing have their risks and its downsides. Both can produce their fare share of danger and bodily wear and tear.

    Either way you'll probably want to educate yourself on how to take precautions and ride safely in any circumstance.

    I have some nasty roads around here, and I plan very, very carefully how I will handle the really dangerous bits. I make mental notes when I ride them in the car.

    Then again I've come close to breaking my neck a few times MTBing technical stuff that should have been easy. A little distraction here, a mistake there and woooga, over the handlebars...
    Hope this helps

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