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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

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Old 10-21-07, 06:08 PM   #1
SalminSam
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Newbie Questions

Hi,

I am new here and as there is a lot of information that I have yet to sift through, but I do have some questions.

First I am just getting into the cycling thing, mainly fir fitness and my 5 year old. I am currently about 265 so I am clearly a clyde. I have a Peugeot ISS500 MTB that has sit in my garage for about 15 years, but it is in good shape. In considering a bike, I would go with a hybrid type as would mostly ride on pavement. First off I would like suggestions of a new bike that would fit me and the type of riding I will be doing (fitness non-competitive). Is there a good bike that I could get (Trek FX or Fisher, etc) or would should I go with a build from frame up?

Thanks in advance for your help.
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Old 10-21-07, 06:24 PM   #2
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A question:

Budget?

There are a lot of bikes that would suit ya, ranging from a Giant to Trek to Fisher (Owned by Trek), to Specialized. You could also "Streeterize your mountain bike with some slick tires if you want. All manner of options
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Originally Posted by SalminSam View Post
Hi,

I am new here and as there is a lot of information that I have yet to sift through, but I do have some questions.

First I am just getting into the cycling thing, mainly fir fitness and my 5 year old. I am currently about 265 so I am clearly a clyde. I have a Peugeot ISS500 MTB that has sit in my garage for about 15 years, but it is in good shape. In considering a bike, I would go with a hybrid type as would mostly ride on pavement. First off I would like suggestions of a new bike that would fit me and the type of riding I will be doing (fitness non-competitive). Is there a good bike that I could get (Trek FX or Fisher, etc) or would should I go with a build from frame up?

Thanks in advance for your help.
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Old 10-21-07, 06:28 PM   #3
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Maybe get the old bike serviced and see how you go - if you get the riding bug then think about rewarding your new found love wth a new machine! Front suspension with a lock out function may prove useful - but then again - I weigh the same as you and find an alumininum frame w/o suspension to be ok off road.
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Old 10-21-07, 06:43 PM   #4
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There are a multitude of bikes out there. All kinds of price ranges, from the hundreds well into the thousands up to a past 10K! Before buying any kind of a bike go to a good bike shop and talk to someone who knows bikes! Wear something that you could take a spin on too. If they wont let you, leave and go somewhere that they will. REI is a good place, but they only have their bikes and Cannondales.

I would suggest that you buy a bike that will last. Probably a little better than you think you will need for a while. Otherwise you end up trying to upgrade it before its a year old.

A used bike is another good outlet. Join a bike club and ask around. Someone is always upgrading to a different bike.
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Old 10-21-07, 07:05 PM   #5
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I agree with Johnny... get the old bike fixed up and ride it for a bit. My LBS (local bike shop) does very good work, and they charge around $80 for a pretty extensive tune-up although I've paid as little as $50.
Get the bike safe to ride on and adjusted for you (saddle height, shoulder-to-handlebar distance) and see how you do. You'll have a better idea of what you need after riding for a bit.
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Old 10-21-07, 10:49 PM   #6
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I agree with Johnny... get the old bike fixed up and ride it for a bit. My LBS (local bike shop) does very good work, and they charge around $80 for a pretty extensive tune-up although I've paid as little as $50.
Get the bike safe to ride on and adjusted for you (saddle height, shoulder-to-handlebar distance) and see how you do. You'll have a better idea of what you need after riding for a bit.
+1
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Old 10-21-07, 11:05 PM   #7
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Yup, get that peugot out, take it to the LBS for a tune up and throw some slick tires on it. It'll work just fine as a stand in for a hybrid. You might even like the old steel frame better than the newer aluminum frames. At any rate, after you get a few months of riding in, you'll be in a better position to judge what kind of new bike to buy.

So for now you can invest in some cycling clothes/gear. You can also throw some money into a nice Brooks saddle that you can eventually transfer to your new bike.
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Old 10-23-07, 01:35 PM   #8
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Thanks to all. Your suggestions is what I have done, took it to get a tune up. Need to add some good tires for street (Suggestions on these?). Also the only problem is that the frame is bent about 2mm in the rear, they said it should effect anything. Any ideas is the frame will be a problem and what tires for street/hybrid type riding?

Thanks
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Old 10-23-07, 01:52 PM   #9
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The LBS should be the judge on the frame. If they thought there was an issue they would have said so
(I Hope).

If the tires are rotted then get some new ones. Otherwise stick with them and ride on.
Of course on the street a mountain bike tire will slow you down a bit, but who cares. As you get more conditioned you can get more "street worthy" tires. There are many options, but just tell the LBS
where you may want to ride?
At the worst, your tire and wheels will absorb many of the bumps on the road.

Have fun
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Old 10-23-07, 05:37 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SalminSam View Post
Hi,

I am new here and as there is a lot of information that I have yet to sift through, but I do have some questions.

First I am just getting into the cycling thing, mainly fir fitness and my 5 year old. I am currently about 265 so I am clearly a clyde. I have a Peugeot ISS500 MTB that has sit in my garage for about 15 years, but it is in good shape. In considering a bike, I would go with a hybrid type as would mostly ride on pavement. First off I would like suggestions of a new bike that would fit me and the type of riding I will be doing (fitness non-competitive). Is there a good bike that I could get (Trek FX or Fisher, etc) or would should I go with a build from frame up?

Thanks in advance for your help.
Why not take your old bike, get a tuneup at the LBS, put some smooth tires on it, say around 1¾-2" or 40-50mm wide, ride it for a few months, then decide what you want to do in the spring, probably spend around $100 or so. You want to raise the bars, you want them even or slightly higher then the seat when properly adjusted, this will effectively give you a hybrid. You can then make a better analysis of what you want, and start a "new bike fund"™ to pay for it. It also gives you a few months to look at different types, makes and models, and become a little less clyde like.

I wouldn't do a build up, unless your exactly sure of what parts you want, buildups are usually done when you have some older parts, and want a retro build. Or the components you want, are not available in a commercially available model.
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