Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 26 to 32 of 32
  1. #26
    Gears? CliftonGK1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Philadelphia, PA
    My Bikes
    '08 Surly Cross-Check, 2011 Redline Conquest Pro, 2012 Spesh FSR Comp EVO, 2009 Spesh Singlecross, 2011 RM Flow1
    Posts
    11,322
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by dekindy View Post
    The Hilly Hundred is 50 miles x 2 days x 2,300 ft of climbing per day. That is hard to do and you put forth more effort than that in one day. You are elite, or at least pretty fit, and don't even know it. I don't think I could do what you did on my 1989 Schwinn Paramount with a double.
    I realize my aspirations might be above those of the average Clydesdale, and I accept that. I understand that at 6'6" and never getting under 200 pounds without being unhealthy, I'm a permaclyde. When I used to race, 16 years ago, I was 215 and 10% bodyfat. That's where I'm aiming for again, and right now I'm back to 237 pounds, down from 262 pounds.
    "I feel like my world was classier before I found cyclocross."
    - Mandi M.

  2. #27
    Senior Member BigBlueToe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Central Coast, CA
    My Bikes
    Surly LHT, Specialized Rockhopper, Nashbar Touring (old), Specialized Stumpjumper (older), Nishiki Tourer (model unknown)
    Posts
    3,388
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    A 72 mile ride is nothing to sneeze at! Perhaps your "mistake" was making it easy to quit by having your car available. (I put mistake in quotes because I don't really believe that anything about your ride was a mistake. I would call it a succes anytime I rode 72 miles.)

    I rode a century about a month ago. I wasn't sure if my level of training was sufficient, so I had my wife standing by for a cell phone call - "I'm finished - come and get me!" Before the turnaround point there was a strong headwind and I was feeling pooped - this was at about 55 miles. I pulled over and got out my cell phone - no service. I kept going to the turnaround spot - no service. On my way back the wind was at my back and I was loving riding again. At about 80 miles I stopped for a snack. There was cell phone service. I called my wife. She said she would be leaving for work in a few minutes and if I was going to get rescued it would have to be now. I said, "Naw, go ahead. I'll finish."

    I suffered those last 20 miles but I finished. I'm thankful that I couldn't get in touch with her when I was feeling pooped! There was no option but to continue (or take a sag, but I've done that before and didn't like it. It took forever to get delivered back to my car.)

  3. #28
    Gears? CliftonGK1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Philadelphia, PA
    My Bikes
    '08 Surly Cross-Check, 2011 Redline Conquest Pro, 2012 Spesh FSR Comp EVO, 2009 Spesh Singlecross, 2011 RM Flow1
    Posts
    11,322
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by BigBlueToe View Post
    A 72 mile ride is nothing to sneeze at! Perhaps your "mistake" was making it easy to quit by having your car available.
    It did make the decision to bail out on those last miles a little easier since I was right there at my car. If I was still the 28 miles away from my car, I may have been motivated to grind out those last miles instead of packing it up for the day.

    I'm making a list of all the suggestions I'm getting here and from my friends on another forum, and the next time I aim for a century I'm gonna hit it! Between the ride itself and all the info I'm getting from discussion about the ride, I think I've learned more about ultradistance riding and nutrition in the last 3 days than in all my previous riding and racing.
    "I feel like my world was classier before I found cyclocross."
    - Mandi M.

  4. #29
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    49
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I live in Portland Oregon, and many rides have the amount of climbing (or more) than you dealt with. You are obviously a large man. Why are you limiting yourself in gear range? With a triple and a 12-27 cassette, you have the option on long rides with a lot of climbing to use different styles, sometimes mashing, sometimes spinning. I am 55 years old, but much smaller than you, 6 foot tall and 180 lbs, but I have completed several centuries in the last 3 years that had between 6,500 and 9,500 feet of climbing. I could never have done it with a standard double. My approach was to figure out the max gear range possible, and then use it to attain my goal. Good luck with your quest, but I would sure think you would have greatly benefitted from lower gears.

  5. #30
    Gears? CliftonGK1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Philadelphia, PA
    My Bikes
    '08 Surly Cross-Check, 2011 Redline Conquest Pro, 2012 Spesh FSR Comp EVO, 2009 Spesh Singlecross, 2011 RM Flow1
    Posts
    11,322
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'm riding a 1991 PDG Series-5 as my distance bike right now, and until I get a new bike I just can't justify spending the money to upgrade components on a frame which is too small for me. The next bike will have a 27t top end cog and a compact double up front which will be more than adequate to handle the hills. Much more so than the 39/26 low-end combo I've got now.
    Then again, I have made a 3 lap circuit of Squawk Mtn with the gearing I've got now... so I'm not doing too bad.
    "I feel like my world was classier before I found cyclocross."
    - Mandi M.

  6. #31
    Tony V
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Sydney Australia
    My Bikes
    Apollo Mountain bike
    Posts
    98
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by CliftonGK1 View Post
    Saturday morning I made my first century attempt in 16 or 17 years. 25 to 35 miles a day is fairly routine for me, and I did a metric back in September (3h 45m) so I figured that the imperial was the next logical step.
    I chose my course with a few things in mind:
    - I would be riding alone, so I needed a lap course where I could re-load at my car each time around.
    - It would be variable weather, so again, going past my car allowed me to change for my next lap (if needed)
    - I didn't want to get stranded in the middle of 40+ miles away if I had some mechanical breakdown
    - I wanted rolling hills and a course I was familiar with, since the first 30 miles would be in the dark.

    I decided that the Flying Wheel Summer Century 25 mile route would be perfect. Starts/ends at Marymoor Park, so I can leave my car there for $1.00 and refuel/change/bathroom-break each time around. The route is on roads with wide shoulders, low traffic, and part of it is on an MUP. The overall loop is 24.2, so I thought I'd finish out the last 6 miles I'd need on the Sammamish River Trail.

    I woke up at 5:00am and took the puppy out. It was cold and foggy. Really cold... And really foggy. That kind of cold fog that I haven't seen outside of the PacNW: You can see the individual droplets in the beam of your headlight, the fog is so heavy; and it's cold enough that it should be snow, but somehow it's still just fog.
    It didn't get any warmer by 6:00am when I was loading my gear. The fog didn't break, and the sun wasn't anywhere near coming up yet. Even with bibs, fleece long johns, tights, a polypro turtleneck, my microfleece lined long sleeve jersey, wool socks, long gloves, and a microfleece hat I still could feel the chill in the air. At least I knew I wasn't over-dressed. After all, it was only 33 degrees, and not getting much warmer all too soon.
    I got to the park and set up my bike: Headlight; check. Tail lights; check. 750mL bottle of water; check. 750mL bottle of Accellerade; check. Seat bag with tube, levers, phone and ID; check. Tire pressure; check. I set up the back of my Jeep with a quick-grab pile for each lap: A banana, 2 Accel Gels, and a refill for each water bottle. I could zip into the parking lot, snag my keys from jersey pocket and have the car open, be refueled/refilled, hit the can if needed, and be on my way in 5 minutes. I did some stretching, chatted with a guy who was setting out on an "easy 18 miler" run, put on my helmet, fired up my lights and hit the road at 6:45am. Sunrise wouldn't be for another hour, and it wouldn't really get light for another 2.
    Zipping along in the cold dark fog felt pretty good. My headlight was cutting through just fine, and the extra LED light I put on my helmet was giving me some added illumination to view my computer. 17mph. Hrm, well it's a little quick to start out, but I felt good so I just backed off a little bit to 16mph. By the 11.5 mile mark, my first rest stop, I was warmed up. I hopped off the bike for a quick break, slurped a gel, had some banana, and got back on the bike. The hills around the back side of the loop felt smaller than I remember them. Maybe my mind was playing tricks since I couldn't see the whole hill. I made it back to my car and took a quick stop.
    There were some more riders gearing up, and they were very encouraging when I told them I was on a century attempt and 24 miles in already, just past sunrise. I kept the chatter to a minimum, and got back on the road after a quick refuel/refill. The second lap started out feeling great. I was zipping along at 17 - 17.5mph, the rest stop went quick, and I headed toward the hills on the back side of the course. They felt a little more noticeable this time around, but not bad. Certainly not as tough as I remember them the first time I rode this 24 mile loop. I was positive that I had another 2 laps in me as I rolled into the parking lot after lap number 2.
    Quick stop, refuel/refill, hit the can, get rolling. About 5 miles into lap 3, another rider joined me for 6 miles up to the rest stop. We were chatting and ripping along at 18.5mph; it's amazing how the speed increases when it's not just me, the bike and the road. I made the halfway point rest stop, and got rolling off to the hilly part of the course, and noticed that my legs were feeling a bit heavy. The first hill seemed pretty tough, and I knew that there was another 800' of climbing to go before I was finished with the hill section of the loop. This couldn't be a good sign. The rest of the hill section was a struggle on each uphill stint. My quads started feeling weak, and my left calf was getting a bit twitchy. I knew at this point that I didn't have a 4th lap in me, and I was going to call it a day after number 3. I made it back to the car, grabbed my post-ride food and a fresh bottle, and went to the picnic tables to stretch out and figure out where things went wrong.
    I didn't burn myself out with the speed, so that wasn't it. 16mph was a good pace which I should have been able to keep up for 100 miles. I felt good on the flats that last lap, but the hills were killing me, so I was a bit undertrained for the amount of climbing I was attempting to put in. 24 miles per loop, and 1500' elevation gain, so it would have been 6000' over 100mi. The last metric I did was 2200' of climbing, and my last hill training session was 3600' in 3 extraordinarily steep laps on Squawk Mountain, but the distance was short. So for starters, I was undertrained for the hill endurance.
    I was eating a banana, 2 Accel gels, and a 1/2 strength bottle of Accellerade orange w/ caffeine per lap. Works out to about 300 -350 calories per lap. Wait a minute... per lap? That's where I went wrong! I miscalculated my per hour requirements as my per lap requirement, except that a lap was taking me about 1h 40m! I was shortchanging myself 150 calories per lap, at least! Combine that with the cold (extra calories to keep warm) and the hills (more climbing than I'm used to) and that's why I didn't make it to the full 100 miles.
    So, I'm not totally disappointed with the ride. I did manage 10 miles more than my last long ride, and a heck of a lot more climbing! Plus, it's all about the fine tuning at this point: If I can do 72.5 miles, I know I can do 100, which will lead to a double metric, and to my goal of a double century. It's the fine tuning aspect that I'm working on right now, and as this ride proves, it's a learning process.

    Ride stats:
    72.59 miles
    4h 34m
    16.1mph avg
    37.5mph max


    The bike:
    1991 Paramount PDG Series-5
    105sc all around. 39-53f / 13-26r
    Wolber rims, UltraGatorskins 23f/25r
    Shame about not doing the century,maybe next time don't do the loops,it's to easy to pull out.I did my first metric century two days ago,I had my route all planned out knowing I was going to be at my favourate coffee shop at the halfway point,and then I worked my way back home.
    The only down side of the whole morning was, this guy was on his way to work on a bike and cycled together for about a kilometre .I was telling him what I was doing,he said great.Then he was telling me that two weeks ago he did "loop the bay"near Melbourne he 250km.in one day(bugger).

  7. #32
    Getting Less Chunky ChunkyB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    My Bikes
    2004 Raleigh SuperCourse
    Posts
    974
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Honestly a great feat. It's great to see people, especially on the clyde forum, achieving new personal heights. Keep at it.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •