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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

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Old 01-07-08, 02:53 PM   #1
Velomancer
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How to "bust your gut"?

The Jan/Feb issue of Bicycling has an interesting article: Bust a gut: Yours, by Chris Carmichael.

Maybe not interesting as such as we've all seen, and probably tried, "gut busting" training programmes. But what was interesting was Chris's comment that "years of carring around a big body" can give you "massive" muscles compared with "140lb pip-squeeks".

One of the problems I always have following these type of programmes is; How do you keep track on the bike? I have a Polar S725, which is a great HRM and I can set basic interval programs but How can I keep track of this:

- 6 min warm up
- 1 min fast pedal, spinning in a light gear
- 1 min recovery
- 1 min fast pedal
- 1 min recovery
- 5x2 min maximum intensity, with 2 min recovery (spinning) between each.
- 6 min recovery spinning
- 5x2 min maximum intensity, with 2 min recovery (spinning) between each.
- 8 min cool down

I really like this programme as it's not too complicated but I always loose count... any tips?

What has worked for you? Post your fav training programme.

Last edited by Velomancer; 01-07-08 at 03:28 PM.
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Old 01-07-08, 03:56 PM   #2
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But what was interesting was Chris's comment that "years of carring around a big body" can give you "massive" muscles compared with "140lb pip-squeeks".
That is so true. I remember watching a video on the news, having to do with an "excessive use of force by the police" case, where there was this huge fat guy - weighed something like 450 lbs - that the police were trying to take into custody (he was high on cocaine and was causing a disturbance). This guy took on four or five cops and threw them around like they were rag dolls. They finally got the guy subdued by basically whacking the cr@p out of him with night sticks, and just piling on top of him - they tried maceing and tasering him, but he acted like he didn't even feel that - and then they handcuffed him face down. The cops were exhausted by then. The guy ended up dying in custody partially because of positional asphyxiation as well as heart failure due to the cocaine use, which was why it was on the news.

Remember, this guy was doing squats with 450 lbs every time he tied his shoes.

I've always been a big guy. I was 240 lbs in high school. I spent a bunch of years in the fire service. One of the things you do at a traffic accident, where you have to extricate victims (jaws of life stuff) is to stabilize the car. To do this, one of the tools used are called "step blocks", which are oak 2x4's bolted together in a stack so as to form "steps". To stabilize a vehicle, one firefighter has the step blocks ready to push under the frame, and another one squats down next to the car and gets hold of the wheel-well lip or something, braces his butt against the side of the car, and lifts with his legs. The first guy then shoves the step blocks under the frame. The object is to get the weight of the car off of its springs and on to the solid step blocks. I was very good at this. I could take a small car, like an 80's Toyota Corolla or a Nissan 240 or something, and get both tires on one side off of the ground.
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Old 01-07-08, 05:58 PM   #3
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I read the same article and I started it last week.

I wrote out the whole thing by listing the minutes and the activity on a slip of paper:

0 - 6 warm-up
6-7 fast pedal
7-8 recovery
8-9 fast pedal
9-10 recovery
10-12 fast pedal
12-14 recovery
12-16 fast pedal
etc etc

I use the stationary bike at the gym. It has a timer on it, so I prop the paper against the display and keep an eye on the time and my paper.

So far I only manage it up to the 6 minute recover (34 minutes in total). I'm working up to the full 60 minute shebang!

Good thing: the time is broken down so it's not boring. I am a clock watcher and would get extremely impatient and bored if I was going to sit there and spin for 34 minutes. But, instead I concentrate on form and consistent speed during the fast/recovery periouds. Much MUCH better. Two minutes zip by.

Bad thing: I'm stuck on a stationary bike until the weather gets better.

Better thing: since I'm in the gym, I can go from bike to abdominal work quickly.

Worse thing: I have no excuse to avoid abdominal work.

Best thing: I bet I'll be a lot faster and get up hills after a winter of intervals!

Worst thing: I probably have to wait a couple of months at least before I get to play outside on bike for any decent length of time!
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Old 01-07-08, 06:50 PM   #4
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What’s really cool is I have a Polar CS600 and I can dial all those parameters in and just hit one button and it will guide me through the workout. I used to have an S725, I would write the workout on a piece of blue painters tape and stick it on the stem.
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Old 01-07-08, 08:10 PM   #5
Velomancer
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snip....

I've always been a big guy. I was 240 lbs in high school. I spent a bunch of years in the fire service. One of the things you do at a traffic accident, where you have to extricate victims (jaws of life stuff) is to stabilize the car. To do this, one of the tools used are called "step blocks", which are oak 2x4's bolted together in a stack so as to form "steps". To stabilize a vehicle, one firefighter has the step blocks ready to push under the frame, and another one squats down next to the car and gets hold of the wheel-well lip or something, braces his butt against the side of the car, and lifts with his legs. The first guy then shoves the step blocks under the frame. The object is to get the weight of the car off of its springs and on to the solid step blocks. I was very good at this. I could take a small car, like an 80's Toyota Corolla or a Nissan 240 or something, and get both tires on one side off of the ground.
LOL... I remember, many years ago, a mate had a flat in the rear tyre of his car. Two of us had jobs at the local timber yard... really tough work with a lot of heavy lifting... The driver had a spare and wheel brace but no jack. Us two timber yard boys lifted the back of the car off the ground while the wheel was changed. It was Saturday morning and the street was crowded... we felt like real heros
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