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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

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Old 01-20-08, 06:54 AM   #1
piper_chuck
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Does time on a treadmill count?

Today I find myself remembering why I prefer cycling over running. My daughter started another set of swim lessons at the YMCA yesterday. Rather than sitting there watching her through the window, they don't want parents sitting by the pool because it distracts the kids, I decided ahead of time that I would spend the time running on the treadmill. I'm feeling it in my quads and calves today. I could have used a stationary bike instead, but cross training is a good thing and I've already got a bike on a trainer at home.

So, do I get to count that for miles, or should I just feel happy that I'm doing something?
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Old 01-20-08, 10:05 AM   #2
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If you want it to count, make a rough comparison by multiplying your run distance by two. It's just a harder workout than biking, never mind the jarring on your joints -- you use more muscles when you run.

I'd rather bike because I want to save my knees, and a summer's worth of biking cut two minutes off my 3-mile run time... but, IMO, running still makes you work harder.
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Old 01-20-08, 10:07 AM   #3
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I can bike for hours, but still with my weight, running is hard for me. Running is a better workout for me, as my heart rate gets up quicker and stays at a higher state while running. I am only running on a treadmill as it isn't safe to be outside on our street or sidewalks because of ice and snow.

Running is a good thing to do also. I don't count that a bicycle miles, I only count it as running miles.
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Old 01-20-08, 12:03 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by piper_chuck View Post
Today I find myself remembering why I prefer cycling over running. My daughter started another set of swim lessons at the YMCA yesterday. Rather than sitting there watching her through the window, they don't want parents sitting by the pool because it distracts the kids, I decided ahead of time that I would spend the time running on the treadmill. I'm feeling it in my quads and calves today. I could have used a stationary bike instead, but cross training is a good thing and I've already got a bike on a trainer at home.

So, do I get to count that for miles, or should I just feel happy that I'm doing something?
The big problem running, is that feet, knees, hips were made for running over relatively soft surfaces like grasslands and forest duff, typically for short bursts with a fairly light weight load in mind. The idea of a 200+ lb person running 5+ miles on hard concrete or pavement is beyond the design parameters of the average knee or hip joint. There are alternatives, at the gym an elliptical trainer or step machine is probably better, because the machine will absorb most of the shock.
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Old 01-20-08, 04:52 PM   #5
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So, do I get to count that for miles, or should I just feel happy that I'm doing something?
I think you get to count it as 'just happy that you're doing something', but treadmills are probably the exercise most guaranteed to feel as you have died and gone to hell.

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Old 01-21-08, 10:29 AM   #6
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After picking up my riding again last summer, I didn't want to lose all that I had gained in fitness, so made a committment to do some running through the winter. I am also not a "real runner" but I worked into it very slowly. I have not been sore or injured since starting the program in October. Up to running 2.5 miles 3-4 times per week at a 27 minute pace. The weight has continued to come off, and I am only 1 lb away from being out of the Clyde class, after starting last summer at 215. I plan to keep running 2x per week even after I get back on the bike this spring. Maybe do a short duathlon. Who knows? Bottom line is that running can be good, and I even enjoy it but you have to work into it, especially if you are a heavy, non trained runner.
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Old 01-22-08, 01:05 AM   #7
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The big problem running, is that feet, knees, hips were made for running over relatively soft surfaces like grasslands and forest duff, typically for short bursts with a fairly light weight load in mind. The idea of a 200+ lb person running 5+ miles on hard concrete or pavement is beyond the design parameters of the average knee or hip joint. There are alternatives, at the gym an elliptical trainer or step machine is probably better, because the machine will absorb most of the shock.
Not necessarily... Go to REI or some other sportsman's retailer and buy SuperFeet insoles. Stick them in a really good pair of running shoes. Then buy a heart monitor chest strap. Use the chest strap and WALK on a treadmill with a good heart rate goal locked and you will get almost as much benefit as running. I can never get my heart rate up as well on an elliptical as I can walking up a never-ending steep hill. Couple that with a good run now and then through the woods on soft ground or on a track and you'll be good to go.
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Old 01-22-08, 09:20 AM   #8
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Originally Posted by piper_chuck View Post
Today I find myself remembering why I prefer cycling over running. My daughter started another set of swim lessons at the YMCA yesterday. Rather than sitting there watching her through the window, they don't want parents sitting by the pool because it distracts the kids, I decided ahead of time that I would spend the time running on the treadmill. I'm feeling it in my quads and calves today. I could have used a stationary bike instead, but cross training is a good thing and I've already got a bike on a trainer at home.

So, do I get to count that for miles, or should I just feel happy that I'm doing something?
I don't know how one can convert walking/running to miles riding on a bike. What matters is calories burned, aerobic load on your body, while working your body. Moving is much better than sitting still. It is funny that I can ride through heavy head winds for 48 minutes and not be winded (but sweating like a pig), but running I can't keep up very long. If I do get on a tread mill I enjoy a power walk going up a fairly steep incline. By increasing the incline part of the downward force generated by you body gets turned into moving the belt, rather than a large jolt to the body. I find this makes for a much lower impact workout. Walking or running on pavement is pretty brutal in comparison. You will be using different parts of your body to balance and move yourself forward so it will definitely help with over all conditioning.

Happy riding,
André
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Old 01-24-08, 03:48 PM   #9
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Even though both are lower extremity exercises, biking and running are quite different in the muscles used and how they are used. The key with either one is to work into it slowly enough and with enough built in rest times that you don't get hurt. Especially true as you get older.
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