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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

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Old 02-03-08, 01:21 PM   #26
Trucker_JDub
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Well, The sun came out today finally and I was able to take my new Continental Town and Countries (26X1.90) for their maiden voyage.

I road in a 4 block loop around my house and am totally disappointed. I had the tires aired up to max PSI and still I was about riding on the rims where as my cheep knobbies I had on before had almost no flex. Now the sidewalls have stretch marks from running flat on the ground. This was on flat ground. Don't even get me started on what happened on the first (and last) easy turn at 6mph. The sidewalls just rolled over. Guess I'll just hang them up in the back of the shop and forget about them. Their not even good enough for my trainer. I never even broke 10mph on them; I was afraid I might screw up my rims. BTW the $8 dollar Wallmart slick I use for my trainer holds up as good as my knobbies do with no flex, so I know this isn't just a road tire thing. This only furthers my opinion that the Conti's T&C are crap.
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Old 02-03-08, 04:01 PM   #27
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I don´t understand why you are having these problems. Although I prefer Schwalbe, the Continental tyres are OK and I have never had any problems with them. Are you sure the tyre pressure is high enough or that there is no problem with the inner tubes?

the only other thing that I thought was that if you wanted a noticeable efficiency increase then you could have got narrower tyres- the Schwalbe marathon racers are quite good (1.50 wide). You could even go narrower and go for 1.3 wide if you really want some better performance.
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Old 02-03-08, 04:06 PM   #28
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If you want some semi-scientific advice, my son did a science fair project on roll resistance of different bicycle tires. He found the narrower road tire on his bike were faster.
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Old 02-03-08, 04:40 PM   #29
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Are you sure the tyre pressure is high enough or that there is no problem with the inner tubes?
Filled to max PSI (65psi) And the tubes are the same that where in the tires I replaced (replaced tires are the same exact size as the T&C's) I have now switched everything back to the way it was originally and everything is working fine. I have no hard feelings toward any one that recommended these or anything. What works for some doesn't always work for everyone.

Here is a picture of the damaged tire still mounted. The rear looks just the same. And so no one can say I was too hard on the tire in my 4 block ride the tire in the foreground is the original tire mounted to that rim. It has about 50-75 miles on it in different types of terrain (dirt, desert hard pack, and pavement). The T&C never saw anything but 4 blocks of smooth pavement. BTW, both tires run at 65psi max. There goes $56 for the pair.

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Old 02-03-08, 06:41 PM   #30
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Originally Posted by Trucker_JDub View Post
Filled to max PSI (65psi) And the tubes are the same that where in the tires I replaced (replaced tires are the same exact size as the T&C's) I have now switched everything back to the way it was originally and everything is working fine. I have no hard feelings toward any one that recommended these or anything. What works for some doesn't always work for everyone.

Here is a picture of the damaged tire still mounted. The rear looks just the same. And so no one can say I was too hard on the tire in my 4 block ride the tire in the foreground is the original tire mounted to that rim. It has about 50-75 miles on it in different types of terrain (dirt, desert hard pack, and pavement). The T&C never saw anything but 4 blocks of smooth pavement. BTW, both tires run at 65psi max. There goes $56 for the pair.

If a tire on your bike looks flat, it needs more air. Like frame weight limits, tire pressure limits are written by lawyers not engineers. Here is how it works, the engineers design a tire for 130PSI, legal wants the limit very low, so that they keep the number of potential law suits from tire failures and blow offs low, so they might say 65PSI. Sometimes marketing gets in the act, which is why one tire will be 65PSI and another 90PSI even though they have similar composition and construction.

So, I suggest you put those tires back on, pump them up, and get on, if they flatten, then pump them up to 70PSI, and try again, repeat adding 5lbs until they either stay firm or you hit 90PSI. If that doesn't work, then put the bike (or just the wheels) in the car (if you have one), and head to the bike shop, and get them to check the pressure. If they read low, then your pressure gauge is shot, you should be able to get a stick type gauge for a reasonable amount, they tend to stay accurate much longer then the dial type usually found on pumps.
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Old 02-04-08, 03:46 AM   #31
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......pump them up, and get on, if they flatten, then pump them up to 70PSI, and try again, repeat adding 5lbs until they either stay firm or you hit 90PSI........
I did what you said with just the front tire at first. I went to 70PSI to start. It was a little better, stepped it up to 75. It was a lot better, road it around the block but when I returned it looked bad again. PSI dropped to 72. As a last effort I went to 80 to see what would happen. Went around the block again everything looked good. Gently when off an easy curb (2mph) seemed good PSI had dropped to 78. Let it sit a couple hours and took it out again this time for a mile ride still holding 78PSI and riding great. I'm wondering if there is something in the tire that had to stretch out? Or maybe there was some kind of bind on my tube keeping it from fully inflating? I don't know but I now have them back on now. I just find it odd that I kept loosing air then all of a sudden it stopped. I even submerged the valve to see if that was it. Thanks for talking me in to trying it again.
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Old 02-04-08, 08:23 AM   #32
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I did what you said with just the front tire at first. I went to 70PSI to start. It was a little better, stepped it up to 75. It was a lot better, road it around the block but when I returned it looked bad again. PSI dropped to 72. As a last effort I went to 80 to see what would happen. Went around the block again everything looked good. Gently when off an easy curb (2mph) seemed good PSI had dropped to 78. Let it sit a couple hours and took it out again this time for a mile ride still holding 78PSI and riding great. I'm wondering if there is something in the tire that had to stretch out? Or maybe there was some kind of bind on my tube keeping it from fully inflating? I don't know but I now have them back on now. I just find it odd that I kept loosing air then all of a sudden it stopped. I even submerged the valve to see if that was it. Thanks for talking me in to trying it again.
If your using a dial type gauge on a pump, they can be notoriously inaccurate, and they can read up or down a few pounds at any given point, best is a stick type gauge, the LBS should know where you can get a bicycle purpose one, you want one that reads up to at least 120PSI, Digital readout ones tend not to work well, and need batteries.... The stick type is basically a cylinder with a grooved rod, and a spring, the pressure overcomes part of the spring, and you read the pressure off the rod, you can check both tires twice a day for 20 years without wearing one out. Why 120PSI, well you never know when there could be a road bike in your future, and those tires often go to 100 or 110PSI.
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Old 02-04-08, 11:02 AM   #33
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I am using a stick type gauge, Its rated to 150PSI and it gets checked fairly often for accuracy. Some trucking companies and truck stop shops have a tire valve in a line that runs a constant 100PSI so you can just put your gauge on there and if it reads 100 your doing great. (always get a second test from another place on the chance the one you tried is out of adjustment)
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Old 02-04-08, 11:24 AM   #34
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Here's a pic of my old Trek 930. It has cheap Serfas 1.25" slicks on it. The narrower the tire generally means the lighter it will be. That's the main ingredient to increasing speed and efficiency. These tires will take 120psi, althought they are rated for only 100psi. There is no simpler way to improve road performance from an MTB than skinny slicks, and the difference was amazing. There are better quality tires in the same size range, but these are what I've used.

http://i30.tinypic.com/2czu0qo.jpg
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Old 02-05-08, 07:15 AM   #35
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The smaller a contact patch, the less rolling resistance the tire has. The best was to shrink a contact patch is with a narrower tire.
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