Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 15 of 15
  1. #1
    Needing more power Scotty riddei's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Northern New England (USA)
    My Bikes
    2006 Trek T-80 (commuter) 1982 Bianchi SS (classic 12 speed)
    Posts
    588
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    I taco'd my rear wheel.

    Well not exactly taco'd, but it's REALLY out of true.

    On Sunday, I attached a child's trailer to the rear hub. The type that holds two kids side by side, max weight (carrying capacity) is 100 lbs. I put my (almost) four year old, 45 lbs daughter in there, and dragged her around for about 12 miles. The roads were awful, with lots of frost heaves, cracks, pot holes (you get the idea). There were some small hills where I got mashing on the pedals... And by the way I had both kids in there the day before for about 7 miles or so (total weight about 70 lbs).

    Anyway, yesterday on my commute to work I notice the bike isn't as smooth as it was (noticeable wobble). At work I see that a spoke had broken. I got the bike home to change the spoke, and noticed that there are a couple of spokes broken on the same side of the rim (right next to the cog-set), and the spokes on the opposite side are really loose. I don't think it's worth fixing. I've already replaced a handful of spokes over the winter.

    This is a shame because I was feeling good about being strong enough to pull the kids all around the neighborhood. I'm about 265 lbs right now, down from 285 (guess I need to keep going). Does anyone have experience with these trailers. Am I asking for the same thing to happen to a new rim? The trailer attaches to the rear axle.

    This is the bike with list of components: Trek T80 The wheels have 36 spokes.

    Do I buy a new rim from the LBS? Do I order one Online? What would be the most bombproof rim for this Clyde and bike?

    I'm taking my old 12 speed to work tomorrow. Thanks for any help or insight.
    [SIGPIC]http://www.bikeforums.net/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=60371&dateline=1202849788[/SIGPIC]

  2. #2
    The Site Administrator: Currently at home recovering from a couple of strokes,please contact my assistnt admins for forum issues Tom Stormcrowe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    South Florida
    My Bikes
    Techna Wheelchair and a Sun EZ 3 Recumbent Trike
    Posts
    16,009
    Mentioned
    10 Post(s)
    Tagged
    4 Thread(s)
    I really suspect that the issue is the spokes rather than the trailer, since the tongue weight on that trailer is only around 10 pounds with a 70 pound load. It's likely it was just time to rebuild the wheel. I'd still go with a 36 spoke wheel though, maybe even a 40 spoker, for the extra redundancy in the spoke load capability.
    Last edited by Tom Stormcrowe; 04-08-08 at 10:38 PM.
    on light duty due to illness; please contact my assistants for forum issues. They are Siu Blue Wind, or CbadRider or the other 3 star folk. I am currently at home recovering from a couple of strokes. I am making good progress, happily.


    . “He who fights with monsters might take care lest he thereby become a monster. And if you gaze for long into an abyss, the abyss gazes also into you.”- Fredrick Nietzsche

    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." - Immanuel Kant

  3. #3
    Banned. Mr. Beanz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Upland Ca
    My Bikes
    Lemond Chambery/Cannondale R-900/Trek 8000 MTB/Burley Duet tandem
    Posts
    20,031
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Rim isn't even named on the site which means prolly not very high quality at all. You'd be way better off buying a decent rim and new spokes and a build. Get a good rim, don't think you'd need anything very expensive to get a higher quality than what was on there.

    Maybe $50 for a rim ( better but cheaper online),$25 for spokes (14 gauge DT spokes) and $45 for the build. Use the same hub, 36 should be enough with the big tires on that ride. May seem alot to you but well worth it if you wish to continue riding the bike.

  4. #4
    Uber Goober StephenH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Dallas area, Texas
    Posts
    10,514
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I had a $100 mountain bike with aluminum rims for about a year. I took it offroad twice. Once was on fairly smooth hardpacked dirt trails with occasional roots. The other time was a grassy pasture. I rode over both at low speeds. And tore up a rear wheel each time. I was about 280 or so, I guess.

    By the way, I think the way this works is that you break ONE spoke and then the damage spreads. I didn't notice it till the wheel was rubbing the brakes. The second time, I rode over the pasture, then on 3 or 4 miles of smooth road, and then the wheel started rubbing the brake.

    Anyway, the moral is, find smoother place to ride, get higher quality wheels, or lose a bunch of weight. Or some combination of the three. (In my case, that bike was stolen and I got my heavily-built Worksman, plus haven't been offroad with it!)

    The trailer may not add that much weight, but does add some torque when you hit the pedals hard.
    "be careful this rando stuff is addictive and dan's the 'pusher'."

  5. #5
    Bikezilla Mazama's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Flori-Duh
    My Bikes
    Co-Motion Mazama
    Posts
    881
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    How many miles did you have on the bike before the spoke(s) popped?

    Is the rim still usable? Once you get it re-spoked, ask your LBS if they can true it.
    14,000 miles and rolling...

  6. #6
    Air
    Air is offline
    Destroyer of Wheels Air's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Creating some FA-Qs
    My Bikes
    Nishiki Sport, Downtube IXNS, 1950's MMB3 Russian Folding Bike, MTB
    Posts
    3,558
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Send Hambone an email - he rides with his kids on weekend in a trailer. He's been pretty busy lately but is a great guy and let you know what he uses (I think his mtb but I could be wrong). Since you mostly broke the drive side spokes I'd say it was an issue with the wheel. Also it's not an issue with your weight but with your torque - since they were all drive side you out torqued the wheel which was already weakened since you replaced a bunch of spokes over the winter.

    I'd say the rear wheel is toast - after 4 or 5 spokes you're just chasing the dream and will spend more time trying to fix than riding. Get a good rear wheel built (Mavic Aksiums or Deep-Vs). I *might* consider also getting a second higher spoke wheel that takes a thicker tire for trailer duty, that way you have your regular ride and all it takes is to swap the wheel and tire to be better suited for towing a trailer.

    Keep at it and have a blast!

  7. #7
    Change=inevitable. ?=+/- JosephPaul86's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Sugar Land, TX
    My Bikes
    MTB, 700c commuter, BMX
    Posts
    295
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I found myself bringing my wheels into the LBS after buying them online to have trued 2 or 3 times per wheel. might ass well have a custom wheel made by a reputable wheel man. I'm rolling on Shimano Deore lx hubs, Sun Rhino Lite Rims ..can be seen here
    http://www.pricepoint.com/detail/132...-Lite-Rims.htm

    don't think they are any better than your stockers though
    "And that's how the cookie crumbles."

  8. #8
    Needing more power Scotty riddei's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Northern New England (USA)
    My Bikes
    2006 Trek T-80 (commuter) 1982 Bianchi SS (classic 12 speed)
    Posts
    588
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Good information! I looked at the wheel this morning, it is a Dimension. The bike had about 1500 miles on it. However, I would say they were 1500 hard miles (I'm not dainty), and this is my any weather bike. Even though I try to avoid chuck holes, it was hard to avoid having the trailer hit them "stop that daddy!", me out of the saddle mashing it uphill.

    I did a quick search, and didn't see anything "relatively" inexpensive. Peter White looks like a good bet, with a lifetime warranty, but $$$. Is there an Online wheel builder that won't break the bank for a 36H, deep V? I think I'd want a complete wheel with 8 speed cassette, as it looks like the teeth have a bit of wear on them as well...
    [SIGPIC]http://www.bikeforums.net/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=60371&dateline=1202849788[/SIGPIC]

  9. #9
    Body by Guinness cjbruin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Irvine, CA
    My Bikes
    Specialized Allez Pro; Cervelo P2 SL; Tsunami (Converted to Fixed Gear)
    Posts
    3,326
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Mmmmmmmmmm, tacos. Yum!
    Fredo, you're my older brother and I love you...but don't ever take sides, with anyone, against the family again...ever.

  10. #10
    Needing more power Scotty riddei's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Northern New England (USA)
    My Bikes
    2006 Trek T-80 (commuter) 1982 Bianchi SS (classic 12 speed)
    Posts
    588
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I just read thru this thread: Should I just throw away my &*$% bike?

    Lots of great info. On that thread one thing that comes to mind, is I do tend to throw my bike back and forth mashing up the hills. Doing that with the trailer and kids is probably putting tremendous lateral stress on the rear wheel. From the info on these threads, I think I will buy all of the parts (Deep-Vs, and 14G DT spokes) and have it built locally.

    Thanks again, great info!
    [SIGPIC]http://www.bikeforums.net/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=60371&dateline=1202849788[/SIGPIC]

  11. #11
    Chubby super biker bdinger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Nebraska
    Posts
    1,980
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by riddei View Post
    I just read thru this thread: Should I just throw away my &*$% bike?

    Lots of great info. On that thread one thing that comes to mind, is I do tend to throw my bike back and forth mashing up the hills. Doing that with the trailer and kids is probably putting tremendous lateral stress on the rear wheel. From the info on these threads, I think I will buy all of the parts (Deep-Vs, and 14G DT spokes) and have it built locally.

    Thanks again, great info!
    Hah, my thread is legendary! Anyway, I recommend exactly what you are considering. 36 hold with DT spokes is the way to go. My next bike, a Long Haul Trucker, has the basics for a great wheelset, but I'm going to spend the extra change and have the rear taken apart and rebuilt before I even ride it. Some say wasteful, I say.. not breaky.

  12. #12
    Needing more power Scotty riddei's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Northern New England (USA)
    My Bikes
    2006 Trek T-80 (commuter) 1982 Bianchi SS (classic 12 speed)
    Posts
    588
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I found a (not so) LBS that I've visited before. They're about 50 miles away. They do a big Internet business as well. They advertise that they perform expert wheel builds, and they carry the Deep Vs. Bikeman hand-built wheels.

    I'll drop my wheel off, and have them use the hub. Looking at the cassette again, it doesn't look too bad so I'll reuse that as well.

    EDIT - For those interested, I received the following E-mail from Bikeman today:
    Sure thing. Straight guage with brass nipples would be a good choice. The
    total would be 107.85 plus tax. If we know when you were coming, and had the rim and spokes ready. we could do it in a day...
    Last edited by riddei; 04-10-08 at 08:02 AM.
    [SIGPIC]http://www.bikeforums.net/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=60371&dateline=1202849788[/SIGPIC]

  13. #13
    Needing more power Scotty riddei's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Northern New England (USA)
    My Bikes
    2006 Trek T-80 (commuter) 1982 Bianchi SS (classic 12 speed)
    Posts
    588
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    UPDATE:

    I dropped my bike off at Bikeman's on Monday. He just called and said that the rear hub was low quality, showing wear, and the holes for the spokes seamed "sharp" and may be contributing to the spoke failure. He said if it was his money, he wouldn't throw it into a rebuild with that hub. He also said that the Deep Vs are a bit narrow for the 35mm tires.

    So, he is recommending Mavic A319's 29er's that he sets up on tandem bikes. He also said that these rims could be set up for mechanical disc brakes. We both agreed that this would be a cool way to go on this bike as it is my foul weather bike. I use this bike all winter, and the thought of upgrading to disc brakes really intrigues me. He didn't think that it would be "that" expensive, and that I could use my original cables, and brake levers.

    He's going to call back with a quote.

    Any thoughts on the Mavics.
    Last edited by riddei; 04-16-08 at 07:14 AM.
    [SIGPIC]http://www.bikeforums.net/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=60371&dateline=1202849788[/SIGPIC]

  14. #14
    Chubby super biker bdinger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Nebraska
    Posts
    1,980
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Mavic makes a great wheel, and I've heard of lots of touring types running the A319. I'd go for it, and make sure it's 36h, then never worry about it again!

    Also I hear discs are great. If I ever have a wheel failure on my Hardrock, it will get upgraded to discs . That's a big if, I may be waiting a LONG time for that one..

  15. #15
    Senior Member barba's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    4,083
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The A319 is a pretty classic touring rim. It should be a very good choice for your weight, especially if it is built by someone with some experience. It doesn't look like your frame has a mount for a disk brake on the rear, though. It is pretty easy to do the front by swapping the fork. The rear involves a frame shop.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •