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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

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Old 04-16-08, 10:51 AM   #1
biggieou
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Back again

So I have been on and off(more off than on) on this website for more than two years. My last foray into riding was last year when I bought a Specialized Crossroads Hybrid and proceeded to put 11 miles on it all summer. The saddle was horrible and everything went numb and I gave up. Well this year as in the past two years, I am trying again. This time though I am engaged and my fiance is really excited about riding. We got her a Raleigh Mojave 2.0 last Saturday and she absolutely loves it. I picked up a new gel saddle and so far so good. I have about 8 miles on it and so far all I have is what I guess is typical "break in pain". Nothing has gone numb down there, so I am thrilled about that. My handlebars on the other hand need some work. My hands and wrist start to hurt and go numb after a few miles and I was wondering if I can adjust the handle bars? It looks as if I can, but there is a big sticker by the nut that says it has been tightened and to not loosen it.

I also made an Excel spreadsheet for my Fiance and myself to track our mileage, nothing professional, but I like it!

I'm looking forward to being a more active member on the forums and be safe out there and have fun!
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Old 04-16-08, 12:41 PM   #2
jyossarian
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No matter what kind of bike you have or how expensive it is, the saddle is the most important part of the bike. If it hurts, you won't ride. If you've hung around here for the last couple years, you'll know lots of people swear by Brooks saddles. Some people also find them uncomfortable. If I were to recommend a saddle, I'd say try a Brooks out. Wallbike has a 6 mo. refund policy so you can give them a try if you continue having saddle issues.

As for your bars, you can try swapping out stems or new bars. If you have a quill stem, you should be able to raise it up a little. Good luck.
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Old 04-16-08, 12:58 PM   #3
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Welcome back & have fun!
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Old 04-17-08, 08:12 AM   #4
bdinger
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jyossarian View Post
No matter what kind of bike you have or how expensive it is, the saddle is the most important part of the bike. If it hurts, you won't ride. If you've hung around here for the last couple years, you'll know lots of people swear by Brooks saddles. Some people also find them uncomfortable. If I were to recommend a saddle, I'd say try a Brooks out. Wallbike has a 6 mo. refund policy so you can give them a try if you continue having saddle issues.

As for your bars, you can try swapping out stems or new bars. If you have a quill stem, you should be able to raise it up a little. Good luck.
+10000000

The Brooks is the only saddle I've been able to ride without numbness or pain. In fact, two weeks ago I did almost 66 miles on mine, and didn't even notice it. I probably have about 1200 miles on my Brooks, and it's finally to the "don't even notice it" point. I've tried probably a dozen other saddles and never found that. Granted, and I won't lie, the first 100 miles were tough. It was kind of painful to get used to. One day I finally just got on it and rode the heck out of it and myself, a long sweaty ride, and after that it got awesome.

Anyway, good luck! Stick around this time, we're a nice group
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Old 04-17-08, 08:42 AM   #5
Viking55803
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From long experience with racing (in the old days -late 60's) and riding, plus taking breaks from riding during the long, cold Minnesota winters, I can tell you that even the best saddles are painful at first. I have stuck with the narrow, firm racing saddles because I know that after about a week of riding regularly, the pain disappears. I'm not sure exactly why, but the areas where your butt bones contact the seat needs to "toughen" up.

That said, I certainly did some damage which comes from the top of the saddle pressing on the blood supply to the male anatomy. The newer saddles with a groove in the middle are a really great improvement, but I'm sticking with the narrow saddles. Brooks B17's are great saddles. Right now I am riding a mountain bike with a WTB Laser V. Super comfortable for me.

Keep up the riding, even a little bit done 3 to 4 times/week will eliminate most of the discomfort. Regarding numbness in the hands, a good pair of padded cycling gloves is essential, and your bike setup should not have you placing too much weight on your hands - it should be a bit like leaning forward to play a piano - you should be able to raise your torso and rest your hands lightly on the bar. If that's not the case, you may need to look at frame geometry or a different handlebar stem (they are completely replaceable.)

Good luck!
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Old 04-17-08, 09:55 AM   #6
biggieou
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Thanks for all of the great responses. The saddle isnt an issue for me now. I am doing well on it. Those Brooks look nice, but I can't spend that much on a saddle now. As for my hands, I think I am putting too much pressure on my hands/wrists and it is hurting them.
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Old 04-17-08, 02:29 PM   #7
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From experience on my wife's Crossroads, you probably want to adjust the adjustable stem, and NOT the bars. The (4, I think) allen bolts with the yellow sticker adjust the bars. There is another allen bolt, on the side, that controls the angle of the adjustable stem. You need to loosen it quite a bit because it has very defined "ribs" internally that insure that it stays in place when you tighten it up. It's very adjustable, though, and if the upright position is comfortable for you you'll almost definitely be able to find a comfortable bar position with that stem.
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