Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 05-19-08, 07:41 AM   #1
moosehead
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
moosehead's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Bikes: Specialized Expedition Sport '08
Posts: 13
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
any 260lb guys have trouble with tire air on a Specialized Expedition Sport?

i'm 260lbs and on my Specialized Expedition Sport my front tire depresses a little once i get on the bike and start riding. I had taken it out of the bike shop after putting stuff on the bike, they had the tires aired just right they said. it was only a day or two later that I start to notice the depression. The depression doesn't seem to be getting worse, but i do think about it, since its visable from up above. i did not invest $40 in a bike pump i know soon I will have to.

thanks
moosehead is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-19-08, 07:53 AM   #2
Tom Stormcrowe
Out fishing with Annie on his lap, a cigar in one hand and a ginger ale in the other, watching the sunset.
 
Tom Stormcrowe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: South Florida
Bikes: Techna Wheelchair and a Sun EZ 3 Recumbent Trike
Posts: 16,120
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Yeah, bike tires lose air faster than car tires do. Thinner tube walls leak air faster by osmosis, it's the nature of the beast, I'm afraid.
__________________
. “He who fights with monsters might take care lest he thereby become a monster. And if you gaze for long into an abyss, the abyss gazes also into you.”- Fredrick Nietzsche

"We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." - Immanuel Kant
Tom Stormcrowe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-19-08, 07:58 AM   #3
idig
atop a blazing saddle
 
idig's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: San Antonio, TX
Bikes:
Posts: 114
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Airing up should become part of your pre-ride ritual. My Ritchey Tom Slicks loose 5-10psi on a typical 2-hour spin.
idig is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-19-08, 08:30 AM   #4
st0ut
Senior Member
 
st0ut's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: new england
Bikes: Wife Trek 7100, GT lola, specialzed Hotrock, Trek Grommet, dead Trek 5200(KIA rear derailer failed and brok frame), and Trek 720 (Died of neglect when the 5200 became a stable mate)
Posts: 748
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
racing slick tires pump up every day. heck even sometimes twice a day.

my other bikes every other day, or or when it indicates it needs air which ever come sooner.
st0ut is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-19-08, 09:18 AM   #5
Wogster
Senior Member
 
Wogster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Toronto (again) Ontario, Canada
Bikes: Norco Bushpilot (out of commission), Raleigh Delta
Posts: 6,941
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by moosehead View Post
i'm 260lbs and on my Specialized Expedition Sport my front tire depresses a little once i get on the bike and start riding. I had taken it out of the bike shop after putting stuff on the bike, they had the tires aired just right they said. it was only a day or two later that I start to notice the depression. The depression doesn't seem to be getting worse, but i do think about it, since its visable from up above. i did not invest $40 in a bike pump i know soon I will have to.

thanks
It's supposed to squish a little, if it doesn't then there would be no difference between a pneumatic tire and a solid one. Best is to get an inexpensive foot pump, that you keep at home, and a tire gauge ( the pencil type are most accurate ) some pumps have a gauge built in, the dial type are not that accurate though. If the shop has a pencil type, then air up with your new pump until you have the right amount of air by the dial gauge, then check with the pencil gauge, and adjust as needed, note the level on the dial that corresponds with the right amount of air, and use the dial to get to that point. May not be 100% but should be close enough....
Wogster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-19-08, 08:47 PM   #6
DieselDan
Senior Member
 
DieselDan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Beaufort, South Carolina, USA and surrounding islands.
Bikes: Cannondale R500, Motobecane Messenger
Posts: 8,521
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Keep the tire pressures up and don't try to defy the Laws of Gravity, Physics, and Chemistry. A tire will NEVER be perfectly round on a bicycle, car, truck, or airplane.
DieselDan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-19-08, 10:12 PM   #7
deraltekluge
Senior Member
 
deraltekluge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Bikes: Kona Cinder Cone, Sun EZ-3 AX
Posts: 1,195
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wogsterca View Post
...and a tire gauge ( the pencil type are most accurate ) some pumps have a gauge built in, the dial type are not that accurate though.
What do you mean by "pencil type"? If you're referring to those where a rod comes out the end, and the amount it extends indicates pressure...


then you are wrong. Those are next to worthless. Get a dial gauge or an electronic gauge if you want any degree of accuracy at all. Note: Being a dial or electronic gauge doesn't automatically guarantee accuracy...but "pencil" virtually guarantees inaccuracy.

The rate at which a tire's pressure drops depends on the tube material and its thickness, the size of the tube, and the pressure. A smaller, higher pressure tube (like on a road bike) will lose pressure faster than a larger, lower pressure tube (like on a mountain bike). Higher pressure means faster air loss, and smaller size means less air to lose. You might end up pumping up the tires on a road bike every day or every other day, and those on a mountain bike once or twice a week. By contrast, a car tire, with its lower pressure and much larger size, would last weeks or even months, and still be close to the desired pressure.

Last edited by deraltekluge; 05-19-08 at 10:20 PM.
deraltekluge is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-20-08, 04:37 AM   #8
Wogster
Senior Member
 
Wogster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Toronto (again) Ontario, Canada
Bikes: Norco Bushpilot (out of commission), Raleigh Delta
Posts: 6,941
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by deraltekluge View Post
What do you mean by "pencil type"? If you're referring to those where a rod comes out the end, and the amount it extends indicates pressure...


then you are wrong. Those are next to worthless. Get a dial gauge or an electronic gauge if you want any degree of accuracy at all. Note: Being a dial or electronic gauge doesn't automatically guarantee accuracy...but "pencil" virtually guarantees inaccuracy.

The rate at which a tire's pressure drops depends on the tube material and its thickness, the size of the tube, and the pressure. A smaller, higher pressure tube (like on a road bike) will lose pressure faster than a larger, lower pressure tube (like on a mountain bike). Higher pressure means faster air loss, and smaller size means less air to lose. You might end up pumping up the tires on a road bike every day or every other day, and those on a mountain bike once or twice a week. By contrast, a car tire, with its lower pressure and much larger size, would last weeks or even months, and still be close to the desired pressure.
The pencil type, depend on how accurate the engraving on the rod is, typically it doesn't change much as it ages, whether it's a week old or 5 years old, it will have the same accuracy. I've seen dial type where you check a tire 3 times, and each is different, most pump gauges are this way. I had an electronic one where it only read 10PSI, and was designed so that in trying to check a tire, it would leak out most of the air, until you only had about 10PSI. I finally chucked it in the trash..... You used to be able to get decent ones of all types, now of course, most of them are cheap crap made in the worlds larges slave labour camp (China), even better ones.....

As for car tires, they should be checked about once a week, a 1PSI drop is worth something like 3MPG, with todays gas prices..... Bike tires need to be checked at least once a day.
Wogster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-20-08, 05:28 AM   #9
10 Wheels
Galveston County Texas
 
10 Wheels's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: In The Wind
Bikes: 2010 Expedition, 03 GTO
Posts: 29,325
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 79 Post(s)
Pump mine up everyday. 120 psi
Low pressure can cause a pinch flat.
__________________
[SIZE=1][B]What I like about Texas[/B]
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PGukLuXzH1E

Set F1re To The Ra1n ( NY Night Rain Ride)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W7jfcWEkSrI
10 Wheels is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:46 AM.