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  1. #1
    Senior Member RayB's Avatar
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    Any Clydes cycle in hot humid weather?

    Summer is coming in this part of the world and it gets pretty humid and hot here for a good 3 months.

    Being a clyde perhaps we sweat a little more than the kate mosses of the cycling world. With that in mind. What is everyone out there doing in terms of salt replacement, if its an issue, and nutrient repleneshment?

    I want to commute this summer but as it is 17 miles each way, once it hits 35C plus humidity I really need to ensure I do not get any kind of heat issues.


    Thanks,
    RayB

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  2. #2
    Can't ride enough! Da Tinker's Avatar
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    Dude, I live in south Louisiana. If I did not ride in hot, humid weather, my season would be quite short. Summer afternoon temps here can hit 38 C and humidity in the 90% range.

    If you ride into the hot weather, you should acclimate along the way. Nutrient needs will be little different from a cooler ride, but fluid is another issue. Dilute sport drinks are absorbed faster than either water or full-strength drinks. Unless you leave lots of salt streaks on your clothes, sodium replacement should not be an issue.

    I scale in at 100 kg, and can easily sweat out a kilo an hour, or more. You got to drink steadily to keep up with that kind of sweat losses. However, over 17 miles, you should be finished before you have enough time to get into dehydration trouble.
    Happiness begins with facing life with a smile & a wink.

  3. #3
    Gears? CliftonGK1's Avatar
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    I just did 108 miles on Saturday in high humidity and temperatures in the upper 80s to lower 90s.

    Nuun for electrolyte replacement
    Accel Gels, Clif Bars and Accelerade for nutrition
    Lots of fluids. Between 1/2 strength Accelerade and full strength Nuun, I must have downed 12 big-sized water bottles on my ride.
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  4. #4
    Uber Goober StephenH's Avatar
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    Here in Dallas, it's too hot to bicycle about 6 months out of the year and too cold or rainy or dark 4 of the remaining months. You just have to get out and do it anyway.

    If 17 miles in the heat is too far, just drive, take the train or whatever, and then cycle later when you get home. But don't stop when it gets warm.

    I notice on the local biking trails, that when it's pretty, they're all full of people out getting exercise. But when it gets hot or cold, there's no one out.

    On my daily rides, I ride maybe 45 minutes or an hour, and for that, I really don't need anything. For my weekend loops around White Rock Lake (about 23 miles, 1.5 hours), I take 20 oz of Gatorade plus water. I try to get plenty of fluid beforehand as well.

    When we lived in Colorado, one of my bosses visited one of our shops in Alabama. He said he went out, jogged down the block, and by the time he got to the end of the block, he was soaked in sweat. In his words, "No wonder everyone's fat down here! It's too hot to exercise!" There's a lot of truth in that, too. There were noticeably fewer fat people in Colorado.
    "be careful this rando stuff is addictive and dan's the 'pusher'."

  5. #5
    Senior Member jaxgtr's Avatar
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    Jacksonville, FL checking in. Temps and humidity extremely hot. It just takes getting used to it, acclimating to the temp and humidity. I try to ride when it is cooler, but do ride when the temp and humidity are higher. Take short rides to begin with and build up your endurance.
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  6. #6
    Neil_B
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    July and August humidity in Philadelphia can be brutal.

  7. #7
    Tri 4 chiropractic studen
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    I have been riding pretty long distance the last few evenings in 85*+ weather. I actually found I get cold because I sweat and then the wind blows on me. The other day I was standing outside after a ride trying to stretch and cool off. I was shivering. I thought a cold front had come through. I saw some mexican dude picking up trash at my apartment complex sweating his balls off and I asked him if it was hot outside. I could not tell. It felt like 65*. The mornings literally are 65* so I dont have a problem yet. Pretty soon here it will be 100* with about 40-50% humidity. I think the breeze will help keep me cool though. As far as replacing electrolites, I keep 2 24 oz bottles mixed with a little gatorade powder.
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  8. #8
    The Site Administrator: Currently at home recovering from a couple of strokes,please contact my assistnt admins for forum issues Tom Stormcrowe's Avatar
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    July and August in Indiana are nasty as well. So muggy it's like a hot, wet blanket. All you can do is hydrate, and pace yourself. Don't be afraid to take a break under a shade tree, either.
    on light duty due to illness; please contact my assistants for forum issues. They are Siu Blue Wind, or CbadRider or the other 3 star folk. I am currently at home recovering from a couple of strokes. I am making good progress, happily.


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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Stormcrowe View Post
    July and August in Indiana are nasty as well. So muggy it's like a hot, wet blanket. All you can do is hydrate, and pace yourself. Don't be afraid to take a break under a shade tree, either.

    What he said.

    I was also gonna make mention of the fact that "hot & humid" means different things in different regions, like Indiana's dog days are sweet & easy in Bayou country. But that got covered too, so....

    Ride during off-peak temp hours? Covered. Hydrate like crazy? Covered. Don't forget those electrolytes....

    Couple years ago, I had to leave work in the middle of the day to go get my two nephews, who were innocently associating with a couple of known pre-teen shoplifters; all four were getting ready to take the big ride (for them, anyway). A neighbor helped out and culled them out of the herd 'til I could get there. 7 miles through lunch-rush traffic, on a mountain bike, in 95dg & about 85% humidity -- about 32 minutes. Took them to their momma, picked up my daughter, and sloooooowwly rode the last two miles home....

  10. #10
    Banned. Mr. Beanz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chirojeremy View Post
    I saw some mexican dude picking up trash at my apartment complex sweating his balls off and I asked him if it was hot outside.

    I to am really good at picking up trash but I chose to sweat my balls off while climbing 40 miles on Saturday. I thought it was 97 but others said it was 111. Some say it was 105, heck I don't know but it was hot. I must have a pretty good cooling system. I'm not a drippper, not even in the heat as long as I'm moving. Only way I will drip is to stand still in direct sun or pick up trash. I use Gatorade which is fine and cheap. $10 for a tub of powder at Smart & Final.

    After 30 sumthin centuries, some with 10,000-12,000ft of climbing, I've never used anything other than Gatorade. Works fine. IMO, everything else is hype!


    Last edited by Mr. Beanz; 05-20-08 at 10:27 PM.

  11. #11
    Uber Goober StephenH's Avatar
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    By the way, if you want to appreciate bicycling in hot humid weather, just take up hiking in hot humid weather. Preferably back through the woods where there's not the slightest little breeze. It'll make bicycling seem so pleasant!
    "be careful this rando stuff is addictive and dan's the 'pusher'."

  12. #12
    Senior Member RayB's Avatar
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    Thanks for all the great advice guys. I will try to ease into it as the summer comes. During july/august here the RH is average about 90 percent and temp average about 86 but gets hotter than that on many occasions.

    I guess it is common sense with getting used to it. I will start with the gatorade and water and see how it goes. I just remember having some nasty symptoms last summer after a few hot rides where I did not hydrate well and do not want to repeat that. Another issue is straight after the hot ride I will be diving into a freezing cold server room which may make for a bit of a daily system shock
    RayB

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  13. #13
    Large and in charge. Big Scott's Avatar
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    The heat is a major factor down in the dirty south (Hotlanta, GA). When it's really hot we ride at night, I have to get the hours in and have a good set of lights so riding into the night works for me. I did a World cup MTB in Conyers, GA (Olympic course) that was so hot and humid that the 2nd place finisher was airlifted out due to heat stroke. That's why he is not on his respective block, he was from Ohio and not used to the hardcore weather down here. I managed to get forth. I could have done better but I only had one working eye at the time because the other one had 10 stitches around it and swollen shut from hitting a tree the night before... Lost some of my ear too! The E-room doctor told me I was not going to be able to race because the eye would be useless but I figured I knew the trail pretty well and it was mostly single track so I was good to go!



    If cramping is an issue then I would suggest picking up a bottle of Hammer Nutrition’s Endurolytes. They have worked for me when the cramps started setting in on a long, hot & hard century. They are also great for Ironman’s. Of course drink plenty of water and add some sports drinks into the mix as well ( I like HEED and Accelerade).

    Ride-on,

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  14. #14
    Senior Member racethenation's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Stormcrowe View Post
    July and August in Indiana are nasty as well. So muggy it's like a hot, wet blanket. All you can do is hydrate, and pace yourself. Don't be afraid to take a break under a shade tree, either.
    I travel extensively for work, and I can say that some of the worst weather year round in the US is the upper midwest. The weather is stupidly cold in the wintertime, and the wind never stops blowing. Then you have a few weeks of spring hat are nice and the summer temps and humidity get as bad or worse than they are here in the south. With that being said, I think that you can get acclimated to wherever you are at. You even get used to chewing the air before you breath it like we do in Alabama.

  15. #15
    Senior Member neilfein's Avatar
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    All that changes for me is that I need a shower when I get to work.
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    I'm in the celtic folk fusion band Baroque and Hungry. "Mended", our new full-length studio album, is now available for download.

  16. #16
    Senior Member Wogster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by StephenH View Post
    By the way, if you want to appreciate bicycling in hot humid weather, just take up hiking in hot humid weather. Preferably back through the woods where there's not the slightest little breeze. It'll make bicycling seem so pleasant!
    Even better, hiking in the North East (I include Ontario and most of Eastern Canada in this ), where they don't measure mosquitos and black flies by number, but by the thousands per square metre. When hiking in hot humid weather, you need to dress in heavy full length gear to keep from being bitten everywhere. At least biking, you moving too quick for them to land.....

  17. #17
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    Have a plan for what to do if you cannot continue. The only trouble you will get into is if you continue on even when you feel faint. I suspect if you keep your salt level and water ok, you will experience no problem other than being soaking wet. Believe it or not humans were designed for agricultural work. Riding your bike is easy compared to that.
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  18. #18
    atop a blazing saddle idig's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Beanz View Post
    After 30 sumthin centuries, some with 10,000-12,000ft of climbing, I've never used anything other than Gatorade. Works fine. IMO, everything else is hype!
    I'm glad you have something that works for you. Not everyone is so lucky as to get by with just Gatorade. I use Heed and Endurolytes. Without them, I get extremely painful adductor cramps.

  19. #19
    Rim crusher
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    I sweat buckets here in the Summer. From Mid June - Mid Sept the dew point rarely gets below ~65F (18C), and is frequently above 75F (24C). I weigh in at ~110kg and have a 13 mile ride so will purposely ride a bit slower to avoid getting too hot. Another strategy I use is to make sure I have at least one bottle filled with water only, for use in dousing my body as needed- this is especially helpful at stoplights where the hot pavement, idling cars, and lack of breeze make it exceptionally hot. On hot days when I do longer, 60 + mile rides, I frequently carry 2 bottles of gatorade and a bottle of water.
    I have noticed that wearing a backpack in the high heat/humidity helps to keep me a bit cooler as it keeps the sun off of my back. The contents of the backpack can get very warm!

  20. #20
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    No humidity here but I did ride 40 miles round trip to work and in the evening when I rode home it was 110f out.. may not be humid but it is hot just the same.

  21. #21
    Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Big Ron View Post
    I have noticed that wearing a backpack in the high heat/humidity helps to keep me a bit cooler as it keeps the sun off of my back. The contents of the backpack can get very warm!
    Along the lines of solar hot water heaters....

    Polar 24oz. Insulated bottles work fairly well -- approx $9.oo each.
    I'm probably stating the obvious -- Refrig the contents overnight or add lots of ice to the bottles / bladder. Nothing like a cool sip on a hot ride.

  22. #22
    atop a blazing saddle idig's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Big Ron View Post
    Another strategy I use is to make sure I have at least one bottle filled with water only, for use in dousing my body as needed- this is especially helpful at stoplights where the hot pavement, idling cars, and lack of breeze make it exceptionally hot.
    I do this too. It provides a nice little energy burst. I usually get my jersey wet when doing this, and the breeze generated by riding creates a nice evaporative cooling effect. It's almost like riding with an air conditioner.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by RayB View Post

    I want to commute this summer but as it is 17 miles each way, once it hits 35C plus humidity I really need to ensure I do not get any kind of heat issues.


    Thanks,
    For 17 miles all you need is water. As distances get longer you would need to think about electolytes and feeding.

  24. #24
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    I guess living in Northern California has its advantages! The one time I did ride when it was in the 90's, I cramped up so bad that almost every last muscle in my body was cramping up. Luckily, this was one of the few times I was riding with other people- when I didn't show up after 30 minutes, they came back for me! I guess I can never move because I don't deal well with heat at all!
    Are we having fun yet?

  25. #25
    Senior Member Nycycle's Avatar
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    I started out at 220 this Feb. and am now 212, and I do not mind the heat we get here, at the worst 105 on a dry day, but I count each day we get thats over 70 deg F a blessing, we have had very few here in Northern Utah this year yet.

    I feel for ya all in the humid areas.
    I hate cars,

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