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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

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Old 06-24-08, 10:42 AM   #1
orangeblood96
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240lbs and want a carbon bike-HELP

I hope you all can help me. I am currently weighing in at 240lbs. My weight should be at 200lbs. I am 5'11" . DId plenty of eating during my wife's pregnancy and now need to take it off. I have been looking at the Treks and Orca. I am not sure if wheels are more important than frame. I live in south Texas and it is flat. I wont be doing any climbs. But i am looking for a solid bike that i can ride to lose weight and hopefully enter in some triathlons. I am currently riding 100-125 miles a week and would like to get to 300miles. I am currently riding an old 1996 Trek mountain bike with road tires. would like to upgrade. my budget is about 4k. Can you all recommend a bike for me? i really apprecite your help
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Old 06-24-08, 11:01 AM   #2
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Welcome to the forums!

$4k will buy you a lot of bike and 240 lbs isn't that heavy so don't panic!

Besides Trek and Orca, what other brands are in your area? What have you ridden and liked?

Oh, and I'm moving down to Edinburg in about a month!
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Old 06-24-08, 11:01 AM   #3
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I've got a specialized Allez Elite. I weighed around 280 when I bought it, and it's been good to me. It costme right about $1k before I started adding gizmos, pedals, etc.
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Old 06-24-08, 11:24 AM   #4
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Get two bikes, but not immediately.

You want a bike to get in shape with. In between racy bikes and hybrids is the traditional sport bike. It will have the saddle at about the same level as the bars.

There recently has been a new category of high performance bikes with a plush ride. Specialized started the trend with the Roubaix.
http://www.specialized.com/bc/SBCBkModel.jsp?spid=33546

You can find variations on the theme in Ti and steel. Actually, Waterford does custom steel and you'd be surprised how nice that can be.

Once you start riding with various groups, you'll have a better idea of what your
next step should be.

Test ride a bunch of bikes, you'll have questions about them, we'll be here.
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Old 06-24-08, 11:46 AM   #5
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I mean, spend what you want, it's your money, but if you weight 240 or even 200, I don't know why you'd spend the extra cash to save even 5 pounds in bicycle weight.

If you just like carbon, well ok, but aside from that I don't get it.
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Old 06-24-08, 11:50 AM   #6
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i am open to any brand. i have just heard great things about both those bikes
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Old 06-24-08, 11:57 AM   #7
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I'm a newbie and have been riding my '06 Giant OCR Limited (carbon) a bit over a year with no problems.
http://archive.giant-bicycles.com/us...06&model=11445 I picked it up as a "year-end closeout" for $1300 before add-ons.
I'm 5'10" & 240 and have not had any problems with the frame or wheels. Beefier (higher spoke count) wheels are generally recommended for a clydesdale.
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Old 06-24-08, 12:00 PM   #8
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you guys have been a great help. I dont have to have a carbon bike. i was hoping to grow with my bike so to speak. I have been riding my mtb with road tires and that has been fine. I just dont want to buy a bike that cant carry by 240lbs frame.
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Old 06-24-08, 12:00 PM   #9
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Any road bike is going to feel like a rocket compared to your MTB. As a former carbon rider myself. I would go with a aluminum frame with a carbon fork and save 3 G. The difference is Ferrari or Mustang.

However my current ride is all steel baby.
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Old 06-24-08, 12:36 PM   #10
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I mean, spend what you want, it's your money, but if you weight 240 or even 200, I don't know why you'd spend the extra cash to save even 5 pounds in bicycle weight.
Especially if you're trying to lose weight by burning extra calories...

The main problem with carbon frames isn't that they're carbon, but that (logically enough) they're designed for people who are willing to pay dearly for a final racing edge. You pay a lot more, get a bike that's likely to be much more delicate and have a shorter life, and get a 0.5% performance edge. Worth it when it's the difference between winning and losing a race you've trained all year for, perhaps, but not really sensible otherwise.

Buy a reasonably priced tough road bike instead. If you live somewhere with real winters and plan to go on riding, consider a cyclocross bike - tougher frame, lets you fit wider wheels, stronger brakes. $1000 would buy a nice Surly Crosscheck. Get a second race-only bike later if you really become dedicated to the sport.
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Old 06-24-08, 12:38 PM   #11
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BTW i am doing a TRI on a touring bike.
And there is also the DREAM factor.

How many other sports do you get to race the SAME kit as the pros. If it has always been your dream to have the same bike as a racing idol of yours and you can do it. Do it.
Do not abondon your dream just cause the clydes and athnea yahoo said not to.

other than that all advise is valid.

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Old 06-24-08, 12:58 PM   #12
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Take a peek at the Tarmac from Specialized if you want cf. It's a great ride, with lots of zoot
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Old 06-24-08, 01:08 PM   #13
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I am 6 ft. 245. Bought a '06 Specialized Roubaix Elite all carbon frame for around $2K. My reasoning for carbon is for damping vibrations from the crappy chip seal roads in my area. Also am looking in to growing into the bike. I see no reason why I would have to 'put up' with a bike with less features or more weight if I can justify in my mind the cost. And really, we are only talking several hundred dollars here. If you are seriously going to put the miles in and get the use out of the bike, by all means, spend what you’re comfortable with.
And as far as my bike is concerned? It's been worth every penny.
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Old 06-24-08, 01:19 PM   #14
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If you want carbon, buy a carbon...tom is right about the specialized...nice bikes...ride all the models you can then make a decision. I know what you mean by wanting to grow into the bike...good luck and post pictures after you have bought it.
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Old 06-24-08, 01:46 PM   #15
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you guys have been a great help. I dont have to have a carbon bike.
The harsh reality these days is, if you want a bike with very good Ultegra or better components, you can only find these on carbon frames. The major manufacturers want you to buy carbon so that's where they've put the top quality components.

Carbon is not about being a weight weenie either, carbon fiber absorbs high frequency vibrations giving a smother, less fatiguing ride.

If you want a good bike with quality components and have a budget of $4000 I WOULD HIGHLY RECOMMEND A SPECIALIZED ROUBAIX PRO It lists for $4400 and is a frack'n awesome bike. With the 2009 models coming, you can probably snag this bike easy for $4000 or less. This bike has Dura-ace parts and is a sweet machine.

Plus it has a compact crank. You really want to buy this bike!

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Old 06-24-08, 01:46 PM   #16
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Yeah, would have gotten a Specialized Tarmac back on '06 if I would have had a few extra bucks.
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Old 06-24-08, 02:01 PM   #17
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I have a friend that is a superstrong rider (210-240 lbs). He rides a Giant carbon fiber frame. It's really lite and he says he feels the difference in acceleration compared to his Cannondale R2000. But like others say, CF isn't just about the lightness, it's about comfort too. Can't remember the model of his Giant but it was about 4k with Dura Ace 10 speed. Black and silver model,nice paint job!

FWIW, he has thrashed 2 sets of Mavic Ksyriums (one $800 set and one $1200 set with the red spoke) a couple of DA 10 speed cassettes and several chains in the last 3 years.

BUT, the frame is fine. I'd worry about the narrow cogs and chain durability with the 10 speed DA components myself. I ride 9 and hope to never go 10.


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Old 06-24-08, 02:13 PM   #18
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For $4000 you can definitely buy an awesome custom steel bike and probably work something out on Ti. Why would you even think of spending money on a carbon bike (can you tell I don't think much of carbon)? What I would do is good a good steel frame build and then spend some money on a good, solid wheelset which is hand built for your weight and size. Not certain where you live but for instance go to http://www.landsharkbicycles.com/ or www.kishbike.com

Nothing like steel or Ti for a larger rider and there's nothing more comfortable and weight is on par with carbon.

Edited to add: Don't forget to check out the landshark gallery or for Kish bicycles go to sprectrum power works (spectrumpowerworks.com) and see what they can do. My dream bike will be a Kish Ti done with a lotus blossum etched design.
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Old 06-24-08, 02:23 PM   #19
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I bought my first full carbon bike (Bianchi 928) my last year of playing ball, that was when I weighed in at a svelte 320

I had no issues with it although I did have the shop put a carbon fork with an aluminum steerer on it. It had lower level Campy groupo (Veloce) and stock wheels(I forget which ones they used in '04) I put close to 3000mi on it before selling it.

Buy from a reputable company and the frame will last as long as you do not abuse it. Components wear out, faster with our large arses, but that is to be expected.

Before that bike and many moons ago I road/raced a Giant MCM mountain frame, this was when carbon was thought of as evil and not a lot of riders would use it for a mountain bike. I had front suspension on it and that frame lasted me 11yrs before cracking it. I weighed in at 235 at the time.

My next ride, and at 275 right now, will be another Bianchi 928 although I have yet to decide if I will get the C2C or the T-Cube frame, both carbon.

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Old 06-24-08, 02:32 PM   #20
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how are the steel bikes handling roads not so forgiving? i mean with dampening vibrations. The roads i ride are not smooth at all and that is the reasoning getting a carbon. i thought it would be easier on my hands.
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Old 06-24-08, 02:43 PM   #21
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I ride steel - it's sweet on bad roads. I do have a carbon fork and carbon handlebars. Steel is known for it's road dampering qualities as is Ti.

I've ridden all through Utah, Idaho, Montana etc, states where there is plenty of chip seal, ie, bumpy roads. The bike does well. And new, high end steel is very light weight, although flexible and durable. With the right wheelset, the bike should be incredibly smooth...
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Old 06-24-08, 02:45 PM   #22
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how are the steel bikes handling roads not so forgiving? i mean with dampening vibrations. The roads i ride are not smooth at all and that is the reasoning getting a carbon. i thought it would be easier on my hands.
It's not the material, it's the design and construction. Ti is supposed to have a smooth ride but I had a Ti frame that was brutally stiff.

Bottom line, get out and try some bikes. Don't avoid potholes... when you are riding in a group or racing you can't. On each test ride find a hill, get out of the saddle and
accelerate up the hill. Great way to check for frame flex.
Frame flex can be a problem for a big tall guy.

My current ride is a Gunnar Sport, it's a steel frame that rides like butter.

If your roads are crap and you are a big guy, I suggest starting with a 27c or 28c tire. You can keep the pressure under 100psi and that really helps. I am using 32c tires.

What people used to do was to have a training bike and a racing bike. The training bike was a reliable workhorse, and perhaps that is what you should be looking at.

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Old 06-24-08, 02:47 PM   #23
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My best friend is about 265 maybe now 270 lb. He has 2 Landsharks and 4 Kishs (all Ti - 2 road bikes, one mountain hardtail and a cyclocross bike). He won't ride anything else. With all high end components (Dura Ace or XT), the custom frame (he's long legged, short waisted so custom works best for him), Chris King headset and custom wheels, the bikes all came in around $4K.
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Old 06-24-08, 02:49 PM   #24
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My current ride is a Gunnar Sport, it's a steel frame that rides like butter.

If your roads are crap and you are a big guy, I suggest starting with a 27c or 28c tire. You can keep the pressure under 100psi and that really helps. I am using 32c tires.

What people used to do was to have a training bike and a racing bike. The training bike was a reliable workhorse, and perhaps that is what you should be looking at.
Gunnar is also a good steel builder. Actually there are lots out there. And I agree with the tire size. When I tour, I use 28c inflated to 100psi just as recommend by late... definitely helps to smooth out the bumpy roads. At home, where roads are very smooth, I still ride with a larger tire, 25cs...
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Old 06-24-08, 03:37 PM   #25
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Hmm, I know of 2 Socal members that ride ti and don't think much of it. Another bud went for a Litespeed to a Specialed CF and loves it. Didn't care much for the ti at all. Another friend has 2 pegoretti's (steel) and a Merlins ti. Says the ti doesn't compare to the steel rides. Another guy says his Lemond ti is very sluggish, maybe a bit oot resilient.

After riding with these guys, I'd avoid ti myself. I would go for steel but haven't heard any good reviews from any of the rider partners I know that ride ti. But everybody is different!

But for 4k, I wouldn't buy anything that I couldn't test ride first. AND I'd have to like it!
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