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  1. #1
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    Wheelsets for the big buys

    I'm about 6' 3" and around 280. I'm probably 240 in fighting trim - Danish blood so no amount of weight loss is gonna drop my weight too much below that. I'm just a big guy...

    So to the question: I just got a new specialized tricross and the wheels are stock, so I think 20/23 spokes. I am worried that I will crush these wheels the instant I go over a little pothole. Is it worth going and buying some wheels with a higher spoke count or am I safe? Basically I neither want to spend a ton of money on new wheels nor fly off my bike and possibly kill some european tourists on the west side bike path when the wheels crumple under me...

  2. #2
    Senior Member tabnlu's Avatar
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    I got a set of cxp22's for under $300. They are working great for me.
    2000 Trek 1000 (yellow bike)
    2008 Trek 7000

  3. #3
    Senior Member Wogster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by blm14 View Post
    I'm about 6' 3" and around 280. I'm probably 240 in fighting trim - Danish blood so no amount of weight loss is gonna drop my weight too much below that. I'm just a big guy...

    So to the question: I just got a new specialized tricross and the wheels are stock, so I think 20/23 spokes. I am worried that I will crush these wheels the instant I go over a little pothole. Is it worth going and buying some wheels with a higher spoke count or am I safe? Basically I neither want to spend a ton of money on new wheels nor fly off my bike and possibly kill some european tourists on the west side bike path when the wheels crumple under me...
    Probably 20/24 ( spoke counts are always even numbers ), the critical itemis spoke tension, not spoke count, as the riders weight increases and/or spoke count decreases the more correct spoke tension becomes critical. A decent wheel builder, will see as he/she increases tension that some spokes will start to twist, and will back off a little, to remove the twist. Then they will again add more tension, and this back and forth process will continue until tension is at the optimum level. Most bicycle wheels are made by machines, most of the machines are unable to detect and compensate for the twist, and machines deal with this three ways. First the machine will be set to only add tension up to the point where spokes will start to twist, or the machine will ignore the twist of the spokes and tension them properly. Third, the machine will tension up to the point of the twist, and then a live person will finish the job.

    In the first case, tension is too low, the rim will deflect slightly on each rotation, causing spokes to flex, flexing a steel wire repeatedly over a short period of time, will cause it to break. In the second case, the spokes will "unwind" when the bicycle is ridden, losing much of the tension, allowing the rim will deflect slightly on each rotation, causing spokes to flex, flexing a steel wire repeatedly over a short period of time, will cause it to break.
    In the third case, the wheel will be, and retain proper tension, and even a lower spoke count wheel, will work quite well, even with a heavier rider. Some bike shops will hand tension wheels as a matter of course, others will do it if you ask, some for free, some for a fee. Still other shops will tell you it's okay, and when you start breaking a lot of spokes, sell you a new wheel.

    The rule on spoke breakage is this, break one spoke, replace it and get the wheel properly tensioned, break 2 or more spokes, on the same wheel, then you either need to replace ALL spokes, or get a different wheel.

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    But with all the labor costs of having the guy at your LBS constantly adjusting the spokes, might it not be cheaper to just buy a new set of rims with more spoke holes? The wheelset on this particular bike are Roval Pave - can I get an equivalent set of wheels that just have more spokes? Maybe I can do a trade with my existing ones hehe

  5. #5
    Banned. Mr. Beanz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by blm14 View Post
    But with all the labor costs of having the guy at your LBS constantly adjusting the spokes, might it not be cheaper to just buy a new set of rims with more spoke holes? The wheelset on this particular bike are Roval Pave - can I get an equivalent set of wheels that just have more spokes? Maybe I can do a trade with my existing ones hehe

    You don't need to spend money constantly. If your wheel guy has a shred of talent, he will adjust the wheels once at about 200-300 miles. He needs to retension them then true them. If he trues them alone, the wheels while lacking proper tension, will fail sonner than later.

    I myself don't mess with low spoke count at 240 lbs. I've never gotten over 9 months or 4,000 miles out of them when I was 220 lbs. I use a Velocity Deep V (30 mm high). I built it then retensioned it at about 300 miles. Now have 14,000 miles and haven't had to readjust it.

    Some riders buy a more durable set then sell the stock wheels on ebay to recoup some of the cost.

  6. #6
    Senior Member jaxgtr's Avatar
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    Deep V's here and I am 300 and I had them re-tensioned at 400 miles and nary a problem. I have just over 1000 miles on them
    Brian | 2015 Cannondale Synapse Carbon 3 | 2014 Trek CrossRip Comp
    Quote Originally Posted by AEO View Post
    you should learn to embrace change, and mock it's failings every step of the way.

  7. #7
    Senior Member vorkus's Avatar
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    I don't know where you ride or what support you have, but for piece of mind, get another set of wheels. My TCX came with 24 paired spoke wheels and I broke a spoke after only 2 weeks of riding (about 150 miles). Fortunately I was only 2 miles up a rail trail at the time. I could have been 10 miles away. I do have someone to call for help, but even so.

    There are a lot of good recommendations for rims here. Whichever your chose go for 32 or 36 spoke wheels.

    John

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    What are deep v's?

    I ride in NYC - and pretty much everywhere. All kinds of streets, parks, etc and in most weather (snow being the exception). Roads are not always in good condition...
    Last edited by blm14; 07-04-08 at 11:17 PM.

  9. #9
    Banned. Mr. Beanz's Avatar
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    I've got Dep V's on my Lemond. Very strong deep profile rims. 30mm high and 520 grams in weight. Normal box types like Mavic OP rims are about 19mm high and 420 grams. Deep V's are very strong and great for us cludes. I use a 32 hole on the rear and a 28 in the front with no problems. Rear wheel has 14,000 miles and still in great shape.


  10. #10
    Banned. Mr. Beanz's Avatar
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    My Cannondale has a DeepV in the rear ( height not as noticeable s in the Lemond pic). But the front is a Mavic CXP33 that another poster has mentioned earlier. Nice strong rim too but not as tall and a bit lighter at 470 grams. I've had great luck with the Deep V durabilty so I only use the CXP in the front.


  11. #11
    Banned. Mr. Beanz's Avatar
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    Linky to Velocity. Take a look around the site, got other good rims too. The V comes in a wide assortment of colors.

    http://www.velocityusa.com/default.asp?contentID=583

  12. #12
    Senior Member EatMyA**'s Avatar
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    Good news is you dont have to buy new wheels

    bad news is; It is best to buy ONE wheel. the rear one.

    almost all old bikes have 36 spoke boxsection type rims, and at 220 I ruin all of them fast. they get "hops" that are more like 1/2" dents, that eventually can't be completely taken out. enough of these and eventually my rims taco.

    Even 28spoke rims can hold a 300lb man. because the lower spoke count rims are stiffer and heavier than the higher spokecount rims, so you kinda end up with the same thing. exept that when rims with a lower spoke count break a spoke they tend to come out of true more dramatically.

    Weight is not the sole factor. Its a combination of how strong you are and how heavy you are. And if you like to ride hard or soft. So if you get to 240 are strong all over including your upperbody and you like to ride like a madman, well....you're gonna break rims spoke tension be damned.

    The front can be anything, but for the back I also have to agree with mr. beanz. Velocity DEEP-V 40 hole.

    with a touring hub. the touring hubs are called mountain hubs in most places, its just a 135mm hub. less dishing required. infact the mountain/touring hubs are much cheaper compared to their "road" counterparts, that will save some money.

    I you want to go all out you can invest the money you saved on the hub on stronger spokes, invest in single or triple butted stainless steel spokes, these spokes are thicker at the base where it makes contact with the hub, which is where most spokes fail. they are better because the extra thickness gives less play and less weakening.

    rims dont fail from ONE big bump. They fail from reapeated abuse and accumulated stress over a long period of time. If you get all three (deep-V, mountain hub, butted stainless steel spokes) AND you get a HIGH PRESSURE tire like 110-120 psi you will have a rim that will be almost impossible to break and will require little maintenance from a heavy rider.
    Last edited by EatMyA**; 07-05-08 at 12:03 AM.

  13. #13
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    Thanks eat, that post was VERY helpful. How much do you think a rig like that will set me back?

  14. #14
    Gears? CliftonGK1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by blm14 View Post
    But with all the labor costs of having the guy at your LBS constantly adjusting the spokes, might it not be cheaper to just buy a new set of rims with more spoke holes?
    Like Beanz said, if the wheels are built right you only have to spend $$ infrequently for adjustments.

    The other cost saving measure is to learn how to do the work yourself. A truing stand can be had for around $50 and a spoke wrench is about $5. Truing a wheel isn't as daunting a task as you may think. If you really get into it, you then have all you need to build your own wheels. While it's not a whole lot cheaper than buying a built wheel at the LBS, there's a special satisfaction in knowing you built it yourself.

  15. #15
    Senior Member EatMyA**'s Avatar
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    Ok Keep in mind I piked the highest prices, only new parts. so most likely if you do some searching you will find these items for MUCH less.

    Velocity Deep V 40 spoke rim $65

    double or triple butted spokes x40 $36

    135mm 40 hole rear Velocity hub
    cartridge sealed bearings
    shimano 8,9,and 10 speed compatible. $100

    Shipping $25


    So for the highest price it will be like $226. More if you want someone to build them for you.

    I you want to do it yourself its not like its hard or anything once you do it a couple of times on a cheap wheel (tear down and rebuild) you will kinda get it down pat, and learn a good skill in the process. You don't need a truing stand, dishing gauge or tension gauge but they sure do make building a wheel MUCH, MUCH, MUCH faster. A MUST for any bike shop, or person building wheels on a regular basis. Big time and labor savers. but for you this is probably the last wheel you'll build for a looooong time.

    Now you could probably find this for $195 shipped if you buy all from one seller, or if you look around for deals you can save even more.

    If it's still too much for you. you can go for a 36 spoke wheel instead, which will save you about $9 on spokes, and $60 on the hub if you get a Shimano LX M-580. or if you go with the Shimano XT M-760 rear hub you will save $40. This puts you at $157-$177, again high prices on new parts.Shimano makes very good FORGED hubs for a very, very low price. They are just as good (some times better) than the $150-$300 hubs. No bling factor though.

    But 40 hole wheels are pretty much a guarantee that Nothing will stop you. heck put your girlfriend on the back. They add a very small amount of weight but put the durability at another level. Most here would call this overkill.

    As far as tires........Well I don't know a damned thing. I just buy the right size smooth ones with 110-120 psi.
    Last edited by EatMyA**; 07-07-08 at 05:53 AM.

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