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-   -   City is ruining my rout (http://www.bikeforums.net/clydesdales-athenas-200-lb-91-kg/442281-city-ruining-my-rout.html)

Wyofire 07-17-08 12:16 AM

City is ruining my rout
 
At least one of my routs has been hosed for a while by the city, and it looks like at lest a portion of all of them will be. Rather than repaving streets as they get in bad shape our town goes through every couple years and "chip seals" all the streets in town, and I have to ride at least a portion of the redone area. For those who aren't familiar with this stuff, they spray down thin layer of hot tar, and then put a layer of chipped rock over it. Rather than rolling the surface and sweeping away the excess rock they just wait for the normal traffic to press in the rock, and then just let the traffic and weather push the excess out of the traffic lanes. Basicaly the stuff will shred a set of tires in short order, and makes the rough fairly rough for a couple months. Once everything gets pounded in it's not bad, but then they'll seal it again.

Neil_B 07-17-08 05:12 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Wyofire (Post 7076550)
At least one of my routs has been hosed for a while by the city, and it looks like at lest a portion of all of them will be. Rather than repaving streets as they get in bad shape our town goes through every couple years and "chip seals" all the streets in town, and I have to ride at least a portion of the redone area. For those who aren't familiar with this stuff, they spray down thin layer of hot tar, and then put a layer of chipped rock over it. Rather than rolling the surface and sweeping away the excess rock they just wait for the normal traffic to press in the rock, and then just let the traffic and weather push the excess out of the traffic lanes. Basicaly the stuff will shred a set of tires in short order, and makes the rough fairly rough for a couple months. Once everything gets pounded in it's not bad, but then they'll seal it again.

I feel for you. My township does the same thing.

racethenation 07-17-08 05:23 AM

I remember that I was so amazed when I spent a summer in Idaho wehn I was in college. I watched them build a brand new four lane highway, and then chip seal the new asphalt. In the deep south the only time we use the chip seal process is on the worst country roads. It is just one step removed from gravel.

Wogster 07-17-08 06:56 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Wyofire (Post 7076550)
At least one of my routs has been hosed for a while by the city, and it looks like at lest a portion of all of them will be. Rather than repaving streets as they get in bad shape our town goes through every couple years and "chip seals" all the streets in town, and I have to ride at least a portion of the redone area. For those who aren't familiar with this stuff, they spray down thin layer of hot tar, and then put a layer of chipped rock over it. Rather than rolling the surface and sweeping away the excess rock they just wait for the normal traffic to press in the rock, and then just let the traffic and weather push the excess out of the traffic lanes. Basicaly the stuff will shred a set of tires in short order, and makes the rough fairly rough for a couple months. Once everything gets pounded in it's not bad, but then they'll seal it again.

Around here, there were experiments with chip seal in the 1970's, but they pretty much gave up on it, what they found gave the smoothest, cheapest and most durable surface was to, recycle the asphalt. They start by looking at the sidewalks and curbs, any damaged sections are replaced, old sidewalks that do not have wheelchair ramps, have them installed. This often means that the edge of the road may need to be repaired after the curbs are done. They grind off the surface of the road, removing 2-5cm of the surface, this material goes to the asphalt recycling plant, where the material is sorted and the non-asphalt materials are removed, the asphalt material is then heated to cause the tar to melt, this material is then mixed with additional material to form new asphalt. They add a layer of fresh asphalt to the road, they paint on new lines, and it's good for about 10-15 years. By doing this, they find that a road bed will last 80-100 years, at which point, underground utilities which are often below the road, like sewer and water lines, probably also need replacement, so they can do everything at once.

What bugs me sometimes, is that a developer is building a house beside the road, the city doesn't force them, to do road work before they resurface the road, so they resurface it, and then the developer digs it up a week later to do their work, and you end up with a bump in the new road.

One of the advantages to resurfacing is that when they resurface a road, they can bring it up to current standards, for example if a road did not have sidewalks, they will install at least one sidewalk, since the current standard is to have at least one sidewalk on low traffic streets, and two on higher traffic streets. This also means that no road is more then 15 years behind the current standard. Eventually they will add bike lanes to the standard as well, as more and more people switch from cars to bicycles and scooters.

They do go over the roads once a year, and any cracks are usually filled in with tar, which is covered with stone dust to keep tires from sticking to it, you have to be careful on the tar though, it can be very slippery, especially if it gets wet, it's easy enough to see though, but often you get a strip of it, right where bicycle tires seem to go......

cyberpep 07-17-08 07:22 AM

I my area they also "chip seal", this is the not good to ride on. Worse than that is instead of chips they use 1/4" pea gravel, it's like riding on ball bearings.
Lately when they redo paved roads around my area they grind off the top 2-3", heat it up, add fresh tar to the mix, put it back down on the roadway and then roll it all in one process. Even though it is better than the old pavement it is not as smooth or as fast as new pavement from the asphalt plant.
When I tour with the bike loaded I am constantly on the look-out for "tar snakes", those nasty lines of soft tar that they use to fill the cracks in the roadway. I have never gone down from hitting one but I have seen the damage done to others who have had "tar snakes" bite them.
Happy touring!

Denny Koll 07-17-08 08:02 AM

Two of my main roads just got that stupid chip seal. It is too dangerous to ride on now. How long does it take for the road to become passable?

Bill Kapaun 07-17-08 12:22 PM

They use it around here, but it seems quite smooth. A bit of a "soft" feel though.


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