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  1. #1
    Junior Member
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    Wheels support my weight?

    I recently purchased a Cannondale Synapse 6 with Shimano WH-R500 wheels. I weigh between 240-245lbs. Will they support my weight? Any suggestions if they won't? I have been biking between 50-60 miles a week with no problems thus far.

  2. #2
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    For sure these are not the best wheels, but probably good enough for a while. I bought an entry level Trek Pilot with no name hubs and Alex 450 rims. I broke 2 spokes and I started having problems with the rear hub earlier this year. I took it in to the LBS and they said the hub was shot. I just replaced the rear wheel last night after 6013.3 miles. When I started riding I was 318 lbs I am currently 250 lbs. I would run the wheels you have for a season or two then upgrade when you are ready. The Synapse is a very nice bike.

    chevy57

  3. #3
    Banned. Mr. Beanz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by indyman1973 View Post
    I recently purchased a Cannondale Synapse 6 with Shimano WH-R500 wheels. I weigh between 240-245lbs. Will they support my weight? Any suggestions if they won't? I have been biking between 50-60 miles a week with no problems thus far.

    I've been reading the forums for nearly 5 years now. Nothing but negative reviews on those wheels. Most riders sell them on ebay and invest in a better set. How long have you had the wheels? 50 miles a week isn't really much to roadie standards. Should be fine for a while but if you ever get involved in long distance riding, you'll be sorry you didn't find more durable wheels.

    Figure 50 miles a week should bet bout 2600 miles a year. At this rate, wheels may last a year, if you pick up the pace ,which most new roadies do, you'll get 6 months. If you decide to stay with the wheels, make sure to have them RETENSIONED at about 200-300 miles, not just a TRUE. IF not, the life will be cut short and you will have big problems real soon. You need a good shop and wheel guy to understand. If the guy says it doesn't need retensioning, find another shop, he doesn't know what he's doing!

    If you want to save money, keep the front (don't take as much abuse) and have a rear wheel built. I like Deep V's (14,000 miles no problems after 200 mile retensioning).

    On any of my stock rims, I fight to get 4,000 mile out of them then toss 'em and go with a V.

    Some weenies have thier minds set that they need a lite wheelset as a 250lb clyde. They think it hinders climbing and speed. Pretty much BS! It's about training.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Wogster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by indyman1973 View Post
    I recently purchased a Cannondale Synapse 6 with Shimano WH-R500 wheels. I weigh between 240-245lbs. Will they support my weight? Any suggestions if they won't? I have been biking between 50-60 miles a week with no problems thus far.
    There is a simple rule with wheels, lets start with a 150lb rider, and a 36 spoke wheel, as long as all the spokes are reasonably tight, it will last pretty much forever. However as you reduce the number of spokes, and/or increase the rider weight, spoke tension needs to increase. Depending on the rim, with some rims, for a given rider weight and spoke count, tension needs to be so high, that the spokes will pull the nipples through the rim.

    Typically for heavier riders it's recommended to use strong rims, with lots of spokes, 36 is common, although 40 and 48 are possible. At 240-250 lbs you should be able to get away with properly built 32 spoke wheels, although the weight difference between a 32 spoke wheel and a 36 spoke wheel given the same hub and rim (with drilled differently of course) is probably around 30-50g. To look at this realistically, your bike likely weighs between 10,000 and 17,000g and the rider is 108,000 - 112,000g.

    One point though, bicycles do not have enen weight distribution, the majority of the weight is over the rear wheel, so it needs to carry most of the load. So you can keep the current front wheel and just get a rear wheel built, or get a matching set made, with fewer spokes on the front.

    Another consideration is tires, try and find out the widest tire you can fit on the bike, and make sure your new rim will handle that width, if you want to be able to go longer distances, wider tires at lower pressures can make riding more comfortable, then being stuck with a really narrow tire, at super high pressures.

  5. #5
    Banned. Mr. Beanz's Avatar
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    You know, I've read so much aobut 36 spoke wheels for durability. I had never considered the 36 hole as it seems that there is less meat between holes in the hub flange. Just seems like so many other related matters that it would weaken the structure or take away from the material integrity. I guess doing machind shop inspection on aricraft parts has instilled certain thoughts into my insane membrane!

    A few years ago, a rider at my exact weight wariding 36 hole wheels and 25 tires. Said it was for durability at his weight. I was riding 32 with 23 tires at the same exact weight and maybe the same amount of mileage that year 7,000 miles.

    My rims are still fine after 14, maybe 14,000 now! About 2 months after we spoke tires, his Ultegra hub failed at the flange. The section between spoke holes broke as I had suspected it might have been a risk with 36 hole hubs. Had them replaced by the pro shop, handbuilt but soon after had problems with the wheels constantly going out of true.

    He had 36 Mavic CXP33's with wide tires and I a 32 deep V with narrow tires. Hmm! Sometimes I think the 36 aint all that great!

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