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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

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Old 07-27-08, 12:31 AM   #1
giant1000
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Just like to say hello to everyone.
After much consideration and inspiration from this site I
have bought a Giant CRS3.0. Any opinions on my choice of bike are welcome.
The guy in my LBS was very helpful and assured me that it would suit my purpose
and also manage my weight (265).
I was concerned by the lack of any suspension but I have just completed my first ride of approx
5 miles over loose gravel, tarmac, dry mud etc and had no probs at all. It was a pleasure to ride
and fits perfect.
Next investment is a cycle computer to keep accurate check on mileage / speeds etc.
Any reccomendations?? Do I need to spend alot or will a budget model do?? Wired or Wireless??
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Old 07-27-08, 03:20 AM   #2
bcc
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Welcome! Sounds like you've found a decent LBS which is always good.

I bought a cheap bike computer working on the assumption that I would eventually fall off and break it, or drop it, or lose it, etc... I went wired since it seemed like less faffing around trying to get things working. I would buy one that does cadence next time, though.
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Old 07-27-08, 01:14 PM   #3
ScrubJ
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You can pick up a cheap Schwinn branded one at Wal_Mart for like $12.00. I have one on all my bomber bikes and have never had a single problem with them.
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Old 07-27-08, 02:19 PM   #4
Wogster
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Quote:
Originally Posted by giant1000 View Post
Just like to say hello to everyone.
After much consideration and inspiration from this site I
have bought a Giant CRS3.0. Any opinions on my choice of bike are welcome.
The guy in my LBS was very helpful and assured me that it would suit my purpose
and also manage my weight (265).
I was concerned by the lack of any suspension but I have just completed my first ride of approx
5 miles over loose gravel, tarmac, dry mud etc and had no probs at all. It was a pleasure to ride
and fits perfect.
Next investment is a cycle computer to keep accurate check on mileage / speeds etc.
Any reccomendations?? Do I need to spend alot or will a budget model do?? Wired or Wireless??
There isn't a lot of difference between a cheap bike computer, and an expensive one, except that expensive ones tend to provide more information. The key with any computer, whether it be cheapest or the most expensive, is the data. The key piece of data is the circumference of your wheel in millimetres. The best way to get this information is to measure it. Measure off a distance, then ride that distance and see how many times your wheel goes around, this should get you within 1mm of accuracy. One of the problems is that the computer counts the number of times the magnet forces a reed switch to close, this is once per wheel revolution, by multiplying that with the known distance it gives you the distance travelled, distance over time gives speed.

Most computers actually work in millimetres, converting that into miles and miles per hour for display purposes, In Metric countries it's easier to compute, simply move the decimal place 6 points to the left. A 40bit register can store up to 1 099 511 627 776mm which would allow an odometer to cover 999,999km or 620,000 miles, unlikely many riders could further then that without needing a new computer battery which resets everything.

Wired versus wireless,

Wired: Pros, fewer batteries to replace, no big ugly box on the fork, no RFI effect.
Wireless: Pros: No wire to try and work around.

I run a wired computer, the wire goes along the fork, at the top of the fork is a looser section, then it's attached to the front brake cable, and follows that up to the bars, where a small loop of excess wire is tightly wound, it then scoots over to the back of the computer. At several points a zip tie holds the wire to the cable housing, making it nice and neat.
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Old 07-27-08, 02:40 PM   #5
77midget
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congrats on the new ride!

For the computer, I run a topeak comp150 wireless model. I have had it for a couple years, and have not had to replace the batteries yet. The downside in my opinion is that I tend to bump it out of alignment and it loses signal. It kinda needs to have unobstructed line of sight from the transmitter on the fork to the computer. I got the wireless, though, because it is a mountain bike and I was worried about getting it snagged.

I ride 99% road with it now, and the next one will be wired.
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Old 07-28-08, 10:57 AM   #6
bigwies
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I have a wired Blackburn Delphi 3.0. It has cadence, avg. cadence, max , Speed, distance, avg. speed, max speed, ride time, etc. It is pretty easy to set up and runs off the rear wheel. This is very handy if you also want to track you mileage on an indoor trainer.

I really like this unit and it has served me well so far. I agree w/ bcc about cadence. It is really helpful and let me know if I am mashing or spinning. Spinning is much better on yours knees/joints than mashing.

Good luck.
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Old 07-28-08, 11:49 AM   #7
jkemp9
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I have a Bell wireless computer (Wal-Mart special). Had it over a year with no problems, I've checked speed and distance against a friends $100+ cat eye several times and it gives consistently accurate speed/distance. I think I paid something like $15 for it and I'd recommend it to anyone on a tight budget.
P.S. Friends cat eye has since kicked the bucket while my Bell is still computing strong.
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Old 07-28-08, 02:08 PM   #8
giant1000
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Thanks for all the advice. Finally went for a fairly budget wired computer.
Seems to have all the info I need and fitted nicely.
Took it for a quick 3 mile round the block trip and it's working fine.

All I've got to do now is some serious riding and clock up some miles!!!!!
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