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  1. #1
    the6abds the6abds's Avatar
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    pedals!!Help!! to many choices

    I have come to the Clyde forum because I trust you guys and I am one. I would like to get new clipless pedals. I am look for both myself and my 6'3" bean poll son. I refuse to pay the price of speedplays, which seem to be the champion in the pedal world.

    I would still like a top quality pedal and I have looked at the Looks and Crankbrothers. I like the look of the Crankbrother Quattros and they are rebuildable. I did not mine the Looks style, though there web sight is a challenge. I have read a lot of good reviews of both, especially the Looks.

    I am not concerned with excess lightweight, I prefer quality that will last. In other words a chrome moly pedal is fine if it is part of a good peda.l What are you guys and Gals happy with? Where else should I look? I would like to here what you think. If there is another forum I should look at please point the way.

    Thanks

  2. #2
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    I've tried most every kind of pedal and have settled on the Look Keo. I got the lower end ones that are about 60 bucks or so. I think you'll find that the Crankbrothers are more for mountain bikes. Some people think Looks are hard to clip in and out of, but once you get the hang of it, it's easy. Good luck!

  3. #3
    The Site Administrator: Currently at home recovering from a couple of strokes,please contact my assistnt admins for forum issues Tom Stormcrowe's Avatar
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    I use Crank Bros because they are rebuildable, have excellent float, and are minimalist pedals (I use Eggbeaters and Mountain SHoes). They also have excellent warranty service, from what I've seen.

    I ride a road bike, by the way.
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  4. #4
    Live to ride ride to live Carbon Unit's Avatar
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    I know you think that Speedplays are expensive, but I paid $110 for my Light Action Speedplay pedals. I really like them because they have good float, are completely rebuildable and are very easy to get in and out of. Just step down and and you will hear a click. You can even ride them with regular shoes, because they are flat and double sided.

    The most popular road pedals are Look, the Shimano's Look imitation pedals and Speedplays. I haven't tried the Crank Brother pedals. I think they are really more of a mountain bike pedal which works on a mountain bike shoe.

  5. #5
    the6abds the6abds's Avatar
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    Crank Brothers Quattro

    The Quattro is Crank Brothers road pedal. It looks pretty good and is able to be rebuilt.

    The speedplay as you say is also able to be rebuilt, however the replacement cleats are quite expensive and you have to be very careful about getting dirt in the cleats. That is the rest of the problem that I want to avoid.

    How about the Nashbar or Performance pedal? Does anyone have any experience with them? I would guess they are made by one of the big names without the big price.

    Thanks Again

  6. #6
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    I think the first thing you should do is decide whether you need to be able to walk around in your bicycling shoes. Road bike shoes tend to have slick, treadless soles and large cleats; walking in them is a challenge. Mountain bike shoes tend to have recessed cleats; walking in them is easy.

    I tend to do longer rides and I like the flexibility to get off the bike and walk around during a break. Skating around on slippery road pedals always made me nervous, so when it came time to buy pedals for my new bike I bought mountain bike pedals. I chose Crank Brothers Eggbeater C pedals; around $45 shipped to my door. For shoes, I chose Shimano MT31s. They have a very stiff sole but look enough like a regular shoe that nobody will know they're cycling-specific; great for commuting.

    If I had it to do over again, I might try the Crank Brothers Smarty or Candy pedals. The small platfroms on those pedals might make it easier to pedal the bike on the rare instances where it takes more than one try to get clipped in.

  7. #7
    Jer. 29:11 pcmike's Avatar
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    I have the Keo Look and, after a whole summer of riding, just don't like them. Too hard to get in and out.
    I've considered Speedplay Zero but a bike buddy today told me he didn't think they were good for clydes... that they weren't rated for more than 180 pound riders. never heard of such a thing. Any clydes using Speedplay??? Are Zeros what I should look at? Need for a road bike.
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  8. #8
    Senior Member jaxgtr's Avatar
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    I been doing some heavy research on the Time pedals and I am real close to pulling the trigger on some of the ATAC's. Currently I am only running some Shimano SPD PD-M520's and they have given me no hassles in 2+ years and are only $35 on ebay brand new. I have used Look A3.1's and Look Keo's and liked them, but I decided I wanted to be able to walk around if I needed to and moved back to mtb pedals. The reason for moving to the ATAC's is that they have a slightly larger base for my foot than the Shimano's.
    Last edited by jaxgtr; 07-31-08 at 09:06 PM.
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  9. #9
    Member scummy's Avatar
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    I love my Speedplay Frogs. I have them on two bikes (neither of which are mountain bikes). I've read a lot of internet horror stories about pedals like the Crank Brothers Eggbeaters breaking, and I'm totally paranoid about springs messing up and releasing. With my Frogs, I don't worry about it. Lots of float, and easy to get out of, without having to worry about spring tension and whatnot (granted, I've never used a different type of clipless pedal).

    Sorry, I know you said you don't want to pay for 'em.

  10. #10
    You Know!? For Kids! jsharr's Avatar
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    I have two pairs of the Shimano SPD mtb pedals. M515s and M520s. Both have been bullet proof. I use Specialized Sport Mtn shoes with them and have no complaints. Easy in and out, two side pedals, walkable shoes.

    I also have a set of Look Keos, the least expensive ones that I use with Sidi Zeta Megas. Easy in and out, single sided, so not as easy as the Shimanos. Look cleats are not walkable at all. Make sure you get cleat covers. Also pretty much have to use a road shoe with this pedal.

    I have never had either pedal accidentally release on me, etc.

    I weigh between 230 and 250 usually closer to that top number.
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  11. #11
    Live to ride ride to live Carbon Unit's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by the6abds View Post
    The Quattro is Crank Brothers road pedal. It looks pretty good and is able to be rebuilt.

    The speedplay as you say is also able to be rebuilt, however the replacement cleats are quite expensive and you have to be very careful about getting dirt in the cleats. That is the rest of the problem that I want to avoid.

    How about the Nashbar or Performance pedal? Does anyone have any experience with them? I would guess they are made by one of the big names without the big price.

    Thanks Again
    I didn't know that the Quattros were road bike pedals.

    The Speedplay Zeros and Light Action pedals do not have the dirt problem like the X2s. That said, they still are not mountain bike pedals, but I walk in dirt with them and it hasn't been a problem at all. Now mud might be a different story.

    As for as the price, the cleats are $39.00 a pair and should last about 10,000 miles. Because they are metal, they last longer than plastic cleats.

  12. #12
    Live to ride ride to live Carbon Unit's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pcmike View Post
    I have the Keo Look and, after a whole summer of riding, just don't like them. Too hard to get in and out.
    I've considered Speedplay Zero but a bike buddy today told me he didn't think they were good for clydes... that they weren't rated for more than 180 pound riders. never heard of such a thing. Any clydes using Speedplay??? Are Zeros what I should look at? Need for a road bike.
    Speedplay are fine for big guys. When I got mine I was 232 and now 220. If you get stainless or Cro-Moly, you will be fine. The Titanium are rated for 180 lbs.

    The Zeros have adjustable float and are really intended for racing. The Light Action pedals are much easier to get in and out of because they have a lighter spring tension. However, the float isn't adjustable. The Light Action pedals are more for the recreational rider. I have used them since November of 2006 and I have never accidently clipped out of them and get in them extremely easy without looking down. Just step down and start pedaling.

  13. #13
    Live to ride ride to live Carbon Unit's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sstorkel View Post
    I think the first thing you should do is decide whether you need to be able to walk around in your bicycling shoes. Road bike shoes tend to have slick, treadless soles and large cleats; walking in them is a challenge. Mountain bike shoes tend to have recessed cleats; walking in them is easy.

    I tend to do longer rides and I like the flexibility to get off the bike and walk around during a break. Skating around on slippery road pedals always made me nervous, so when it came time to buy pedals for my new bike I bought mountain bike pedals. I chose Crank Brothers Eggbeater C pedals; around $45 shipped to my door. For shoes, I chose Shimano MT31s. They have a very stiff sole but look enough like a regular shoe that nobody will know they're cycling-specific; great for commuting.

    If I had it to do over again, I might try the Crank Brothers Smarty or Candy pedals. The small platfroms on those pedals might make it easier to pedal the bike on the rare instances where it takes more than one try to get clipped in.
    I have spoken to people that work for Crank Brothers and they don't recommend the Smarty Pedals. The Candies are much better they tell me.

  14. #14
    Senior Member
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    I have eggbeaters on my mtb and my roadie. I wear Cannondale mtb shoes; being able to walk around when I stop is nice.
    Well, Yeah. Because that's what cake is FOR.

  15. #15
    Senior Member Pinyon's Avatar
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    I like your standard, double-sided SPD pedals. They are easy to clip into, the shoes are easier to walk in, and the slightly larger pedal platform allows me to stomp on the pedals, with one pedal in the middle of my shoe. That way, I can get through the intersection as fast as possible, and worry about clipping in after I'm across the street and not potentially in the way of traffic.

    That is the main reason that I did not like Look Keo pedals. They are more difficult to clip into, and if you miss clipping in and try to pedal anyway, your foot is very prone to slipping off the pedal like it is made of ice. SPD shoes are a little heavier, and not as stiff, though.

    I've been thinking about trying speedplays the next time that I need pedals or shoes. They are double-sided, and the guys that I know with them say that it is pretty easy to stand and stomp-pedal while not being clipped in.

  16. #16
    Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pinyon View Post
    I like your standard, double-sided SPD pedals. They are easy to clip into, the shoes are easier to walk in, and the slightly larger pedal platform allows me to stomp on the pedals, with one pedal in the middle of my shoe. That way, I can get through the intersection as fast as possible, and worry about clipping in after I'm across the street and not potentially in the way of traffic.
    The only problem with SPD pedals is the lack of float. I can't ride more than a couple of miles in them without having serious knee pain... This is one of the reasons I suggested the Crank Brothers Candy or Smarty; they have an SPD-like platform with twice as much float as most SPD pedals.

  17. #17
    Kyleness
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    +1 more for SPD. i've had a set on one of my bikes for over 2 years, no issues at all with them. I also have the Welgo knockoff spd's that come on a lot of Bianchi bikes and they have been great too. My third bike i bought the non-Bianchi badged welgo SPD pedals and no problems with them either. I've got 3 bikes set up with essentially the same pedal system and haven't had an issue with any of them and each set has at least 5000-10,000 miles and still going.
    The main reason i went with SPD is becuase they seem to be fairly priced, great quality, great durability, easy to use, and have a huge selection of shoes both walkable and road. It's nice to be able to have a few different pairs of shoes but never have to change cleats depending on which bike you're taking out.
    I have heard bad things about SPD about them giving your feet "hot spots" due to the relatively small cleat, but i haven't had that problem and neither has anyone else i know that uses them. I've only heard that on the interntet.
    If you are interested in SPD pedals though here's a tip, talk to your LBS, a lot of the times when someone buys a bike it comes with SPD but they already have another pedal system on their other bikes so they get the pedals switched before even getting the bike out the door, and a lot of LBS' will sell these "used" pedals at a bit of a discount. I got the Bianchi ones which were brand new, but because they were already installed on a bike they ran me $20 instead of $40 or whatever.

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