Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 26
  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    5
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    What can I do to go faster?

    Found a beautiful 14/22 mile route here along the Columbia River in the tricities, and I absolutely love riding it, but I'm wondering what I'm lacking to go faster?

    The bike I have is a 2006 Raleigh Mojave 2.0 21 spd mtb. The lbs fit the frame to my shortish size. The 14 mile portion of it takes me exactly 1 hour to run, so I'm getting 14mph (I'm really good at math, see!) The ride is mostly flat, and I find myself most of the time in 3-6 or 3-7. 3-6 has the cadence I like, but not the speed, and 3-7 is faster but at a lower but still doable cadence. I feel like I've basically topped out my bike. Are there any improvements I can make to my bike to make it go faster? I did get some new tires from my lbs, but they max out at like 60 or 65 psi.

    I was going to go get one of the tires to get all the details on it, but the bike is in the back of my wife's van, and she's at work! I'll update this thread in an hour or so when she gets home with my bike. The tires are on the stock rims, and are roughly the same size as the knobies that came with the bike, but have a smooth section of tread about 1" to 1 1/2" wide down the center.

    So what's holding me back? I'd like to try to get up to AT LEAST 18mph, with room to spare. Can I accomplish this with better wheels? Or do I need to bite the bullet, and get some type of road bike.

    Thanks for all the help!

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Near Sacramento
    Posts
    4,872
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Get a cycling computer with cadence. That'll tell you how fast you're pedaling. From the gears you are runnning, it sounds like you're pedaling pretty slowly. Even on my MTB, I keep my cadence up to 90 or more pending terrain. On roads, I tend toward 98rpm's.
    -------

    Some sort of pithy irrelevant one-liner should go here.

  3. #3
    Galveston County Texas 10 Wheels's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    In The Wind
    Posts
    25,579
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by eric.dunfee View Post
    Found a beautiful 14/22 mile route here along the Columbia River in the tricities, and I absolutely love riding it, but I'm wondering what I'm lacking to go faster?

    The bike I have is a 2006 Raleigh Mojave 2.0 21 spd mtb. The lbs fit the frame to my shortish size. The 14 mile portion of it takes me exactly 1 hour to run, so I'm getting 14mph (I'm really good at math, see!) The ride is mostly flat, and I find myself most of the time in 3-6 or 3-7. 3-6 has the cadence I like, but not the speed, and 3-7 is faster but at a lower but still doable cadence. I feel like I've basically topped out my bike. Are there any improvements I can make to my bike to make it go faster? I did get some new tires from my lbs, but they max out at like 60 or 65 psi.

    I was going to go get one of the tires to get all the details on it, but the bike is in the back of my wife's van, and she's at work! I'll update this thread in an hour or so when she gets home with my bike. The tires are on the stock rims, and are roughly the same size as the knobies that came with the bike, but have a smooth section of tread about 1" to 1 1/2" wide down the center.

    So what's holding me back? I'd like to try to get up to AT LEAST 18mph, with room to spare. Can I accomplish this with better wheels? Or do I need to bite the bullet, and get some type of road bike.

    Thanks for all the help!
    You are the motor, Riding is 10% Bike- 90% motor.
    Last June I rode 100 miles at The Indy Speedway Track.
    Rode 2.5 hours with a tandem Raleigh Mountain bike with knobby tires.
    They lead a Pace line of road bikes at 19 mph.
    After they slowed down, I rode with them for 2 hours.
    You are The Motor.

    Tandem on right in pic. Photo 70 miles complete (left is track police, find um at the donut shop when not riding)
    Last edited by 10 Wheels; 08-08-08 at 10:25 PM.
    [SIZE=1][B]What I like about Texas[/B]
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PGukLuXzH1E

    Set F1re To The Ra1n ( NY Night Rain Ride)
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W7jfcWEkSrI

  4. #4
    Senior Member deraltekluge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    My Bikes
    Kona Cinder Cone, Sun EZ-3 AX
    Posts
    1,195
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    According to Sheldon Brown's gear calculator (http://www.sheldonbrown.com/gears/), at a cadence of 60, you'd be going 13.8 mph in 3-6, and 15.8 mph in 3-7. (I used 1.9" for tire size, and the gear numbers from the Raleigh site http://www.raleighusa.com/bikes/moun...20/?page=specs).

    At a cadence of 80, your speeds would be 18.4 mph and 21.0 mph, respectively.

    To go faster, pedal faster. To reduce drag so that you can pedal faster, get higher pressure, smoother tires. Or...ride more and work harder and build up your muscles.

  5. #5
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    5
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Awesome! Thanks for the input! I will definately try this tomorrow and see how it goes. I think I will definately buy one of those computers though, as that will help. On my bike trainer, I found a good feeling pace at 80rpm, but when I tried that on the route, it just felt like I was in a granny gear! I'm going out tomorrow morning, and will definately concentrate more on getting my cadence up in those higher gears.


    EDIT: Any tires in particular I should look for? Will I be able to use my current rims? Thanks for the help!
    Last edited by eric.dunfee; 08-08-08 at 10:36 PM.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    1,265
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Ride more. As the others have said, you need to improve your cadence. But just riding will get you in better shape, and you'll get more used to spinning at higher cadences.

  7. #7
    Senior Member mkadam68's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    30 minutes North-West of Los Angeles.
    My Bikes
    2012 MotorHouse road bike. No. You can't get one.
    Posts
    3,579
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    You riding on the road or a paved path? Get a road bike. You'll instantly go a bit faster. Promise.

    Visit The C-Blog : the blog about cycling.

  8. #8
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    5
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by mkadam68 View Post
    You riding on the road or a paved path? Get a road bike. You'll instantly go a bit faster. Promise.
    Both, but mostly paved path, and the road isn't in the greatest condition any more.

  9. #9
    Banned. Mr. Beanz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Upland Ca
    My Bikes
    Lemond Chambery/Cannondale R-900/Trek 8000 MTB/Burley Duet tandem
    Posts
    20,031
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Get some slicks for your mtb. I've had some about 1.25 wide taht inflate to 90 psi. Might be some at 100. That will help the bike go faster! Also throw in some intervals and hard efforts to lift your overall cruising speed. Tires should fit your currnet mtb rims.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Jtgyk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Richardson TX
    Posts
    1,308
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Specialized Fat Boy slicks, Sized 26 X 1.25 rated to 100psi.
    I thought I was topping out (spinning out) too, when I started. Got a computer with cadence and learned to spin.
    High 70's in 2/7 = 15 mph. Now I'm working on getting up into the high eighties/ low nineties.
    Oddly enough, if I make a conscious effort to lighten my pressure on the pedals and just think about moving my feet faster I'll just zoom along. It feels like it should be just the opposite....but who am I to argue with what obviously works.
    * Riding with my wife (doesn't like to go faster than 12 mph) is a great way to practice spinning. I just gear down to where my cadence matches whatever target I've set for her speed.
    Hey, I'm just this GUY...you know?
    >>>Team Critical Mess<<< (You mean it's not SUPPOSE to hurt?)

    My nice new Nashbar Touring Build AKA "The Flying Avocadooooooooo!"
    1998(?) Trek 700 Multitrack
    1995 Trek 1220 AKA "Jimi"
    Older Non-suspension Specialized Hardrock

  11. #11
    Roast Beast Sammich Sammiches's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    My Bikes
    Specialized Stumpjumper
    Posts
    122
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    For my commute I ride a MTB with stock tires - yes I know it's far short of optimal. I mean to at least get some road tires.

    Last week a guy on a road bike turned onto the road just ahead of me, cranking a bit slow like he was warming up. I was almost certain I was pedaling a faster cadence but he slowly widened his lead even tho' I was locked into my highest gear. Was I misjudging his cadence because of fatigue, or do road bikes have a faster gear set?

  12. #12
    Senior Member Jtgyk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Richardson TX
    Posts
    1,308
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Sammiches View Post
    For my commute I ride a MTB with stock tires - yes I know it's far short of optimal. I mean to at least get some road tires.

    Last week a guy on a road bike turned onto the road just ahead of me, cranking a bit slow like he was warming up. I was almost certain I was pedaling a faster cadence but he slowly widened his lead even tho' I was locked into my highest gear. Was I misjudging his cadence because of fatigue, or do road bikes have a faster gear set?
    It's a combination of larger wheels with higher pressure, narrow tires (less road contact-less friction) leading to decreased rolling resistance. And yes, gearing is more for speed with road bikes.

    If you try a road bike you'll feel the difference.
    Hey, I'm just this GUY...you know?
    >>>Team Critical Mess<<< (You mean it's not SUPPOSE to hurt?)

    My nice new Nashbar Touring Build AKA "The Flying Avocadooooooooo!"
    1998(?) Trek 700 Multitrack
    1995 Trek 1220 AKA "Jimi"
    Older Non-suspension Specialized Hardrock

  13. #13
    Senior Member Wogster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Toronto (again) Ontario, Canada
    My Bikes
    Norco Bushpilot (out of commission), Raleigh Delta
    Posts
    6,944
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Sammiches View Post
    For my commute I ride a MTB with stock tires - yes I know it's far short of optimal. I mean to at least get some road tires.

    Last week a guy on a road bike turned onto the road just ahead of me, cranking a bit slow like he was warming up. I was almost certain I was pedaling a faster cadence but he slowly widened his lead even tho' I was locked into my highest gear. Was I misjudging his cadence because of fatigue, or do road bikes have a faster gear set?
    Yes, road bikes are geared higher, the typical mountain bike will have 11-34 in the back and 22/32/42 in the front, the typical road bike will be 12-28 in the back and 30/39/53 in the front, meaning his median gear is your high gear, and larger wheels also mean higher gearing. This means that although he has a major advantage going flat and down hill, you have a lower gear for uphill

  14. #14
    Senior Member dbikingman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Spokane/Tri-Cities WA
    My Bikes
    mountain bike, road bike
    Posts
    1,331
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Eric, are you riding the loop from the Cable Bridge to Lee-Volpentest Bridges (I-182). Consider which way you are riding in relationship to the wind. Try to have the wind at your back on the Pasco side because you are more exposed and the path is elevated. When you are on the Kennewick side the trees provide more of a break. If this isn't your route give it a try.

  15. #15
    Keep on, keepin on B Piddy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    La Crescent, MN
    My Bikes
    IRO Jamie Roy Custom build, Giant Sedona, '06 Trek Madone 5.2
    Posts
    228
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Eric - Get a Cateye Astrale 8 as cycling computer. Speed sensor can be mounted to your rear wheel which is nice when on the trainer and it has a cadance sensor. Works great and is pretty cheap.
    04 Giant Sedona
    07 IRO Jamie Roy
    06 Trek Madone 5.2

  16. #16
    Senior Member RedC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Sebring, Florida
    My Bikes
    Trek Navigator, LeMond Buenos Aires, Madone 5.9, S-Works Roubaix
    Posts
    762
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    You guys really p____ me off. I've been riding for two months and I just completed my first group ride also my longest ride every at 27 miles avg 12.5 mph. Fort;unate to have patient and considerate fellow club members to help me. But I was comforting myself that it was about having the wrong equipment and you come along and tell me it's my fat a__ (10% bike 90% motor) so as tired as I am, you won't let me just pat myself on the back because obviously I've got a lot more work to do to run the speeds I'd like to run.
    Red, like the color my hair used to be.

    Lemond Buenos Aires(Broke) Madone 5.9 for sale,Navigator 2, S-Works Roubaix

  17. #17
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Near Sacramento
    Posts
    4,872
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Ha! That's funny. The thing is, it takes a lot of work to go faster and longer, there's just no way around it.
    -------

    Some sort of pithy irrelevant one-liner should go here.

  18. #18
    Senior Member Jtgyk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Richardson TX
    Posts
    1,308
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by RedC View Post
    You guys really p____ me off. I've been riding for two months and I just completed my first group ride also my longest ride every at 27 miles avg 12.5 mph. Fort;unate to have patient and considerate fellow club members to help me. But I was comforting myself that it was about having the wrong equipment and you come along and tell me it's my fat a__ (10% bike 90% motor) so as tired as I am, you won't let me just pat myself on the back because obviously I've got a lot more work to do to run the speeds I'd like to run.

    Just because I said I could go that fast doesn't mean I can maintain that spin for long distances.
    On 25 + mile rides I average around your speed. Long hills can still kick my butt.

    I'm actually a bit faster using my road bike (on short commutes)...about 2mph faster but it feels different enough that I'm still getting use to it.
    Hey, I'm just this GUY...you know?
    >>>Team Critical Mess<<< (You mean it's not SUPPOSE to hurt?)

    My nice new Nashbar Touring Build AKA "The Flying Avocadooooooooo!"
    1998(?) Trek 700 Multitrack
    1995 Trek 1220 AKA "Jimi"
    Older Non-suspension Specialized Hardrock

  19. #19
    Senior Member daintonj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    372
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    This might not be the safest advice but I've never had any issues with going above the max pressure on tyres. When I had a slicked up MTB I'd inflate to 85 when the max was 65 and my road tyres are inflated to 125 with a max of 110.

  20. #20
    Lone Star Tex_Arcana's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Houston, Tx.
    Posts
    562
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hey Red, Don't worry about it. You're definitely doing better then you were. At least your trying. You will get better and it takes time and work. I say good on you dude. While I'm not the strongest or fastest by a long shot, I can still take pride that I'm still fast and strong for a guy my age and weight and I am improving. This realization came when I went riding with my younger, thinner neighbor. I thought I was going easy, not getting much of a work out at all and taking a lot more rest breaks.

    My neighbor thought I was trying to out macho him by going faster and longer then any sane person would. He was p. o. ed that I wasn't even breathing hard, slowing up to have chats with him, and other outrageous behaviors. He now refuses to ride with me anymore. Doesn't even want to think about riding with me on the half century I'm planning for my 50th birthday (he was for it when he first miss heard me and thought I was saying 15 mile ride though)

    For the OP, what you are looking for is something like this http://www.performancebike.com/shop/...tegory_ID=5425 for your mtb. I have a Performance Bike shop a few miles from where I live so I plan to get a pair of these before my half century.

  21. #21
    the actual el guapo atomship47's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    midwest
    My Bikes
    '06 trek 7300, '05 db wildwood, '07 felt z35
    Posts
    1,035
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    a 14 mph avg on a mtb is pretty dang fast. i think the fastest i ever got on my hybrid was about 16.

    but, if you're looking to make a change, i'd get smaller tires (that still fit on your rims) with a much higher maximum tire pressure.
    Compatibility:

    Your exact opposite is the Televangelist.

    Other personalities you would probably get along with are the Capitalist Pig, the Smartass, and the Sociopath.

  22. #22
    Banned. Mr. Beanz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Upland Ca
    My Bikes
    Lemond Chambery/Cannondale R-900/Trek 8000 MTB/Burley Duet tandem
    Posts
    20,031
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Jtgyk View Post
    It's a combination of larger wheels
    You sure it has to do with larger tires? Lots of tri bikes and wimmins roadies have 650 c tires!

  23. #23
    Senior Member mkadam68's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    30 minutes North-West of Los Angeles.
    My Bikes
    2012 MotorHouse road bike. No. You can't get one.
    Posts
    3,579
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by JoelS View Post
    Ha! That's funny. The thing is, it takes a lot of work to go faster and longer, there's just no way around it.
    True. I found in my own case, there were certain speed plateaus. For instance, when I started about 2 years ago I could average 12mph. Then, it jumped to 15mph. Then 18mph. Finally, I broke the 20mph barrier. Last November, I completed a century (110 miles) in less than 5 hours, averaging 22mph for the full 4 hours, 59 minutes. Currently, I race crits with some national-caliber racers, and we do 60-mins at 26mph avg.

    Keep at it, break through one level, and the old barrier seems easy from then on. You can do it.

    BTW, 14mph on a MTB is a good job!!

    Visit The C-Blog : the blog about cycling.

  24. #24
    Senior Member Jtgyk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Richardson TX
    Posts
    1,308
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Beanz View Post
    You sure it has to do with larger tires? Lots of tri bikes and wimmins roadies have 650 c tires!
    OK...OK!
    Tires, Tire Pressure, AND a kick ***** engine
    Hey, I'm just this GUY...you know?
    >>>Team Critical Mess<<< (You mean it's not SUPPOSE to hurt?)

    My nice new Nashbar Touring Build AKA "The Flying Avocadooooooooo!"
    1998(?) Trek 700 Multitrack
    1995 Trek 1220 AKA "Jimi"
    Older Non-suspension Specialized Hardrock

  25. #25
    Prefers Cicero cooker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Toronto
    My Bikes
    1984 Trek 520; 1990s Peugeot (Canadian-made) rigid mountain bike; 2007 Bike Friday NWT; misc others
    Posts
    8,466
    Mentioned
    23 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Three things to do.

    Get your head and torso lower for better aerodynamics. Air resistance is the biggest factor limiting bike speed. Of course since you are a clyde, there's a limit to how low you can go before your gut gets in the way. (I know).

    Speed up the bike with thinner slicker tires.

    Increase your aerobic capacity using interval training. Basically it means sprinting hard, easing up, sprinting hard, and doing that repetitively.
    Last edited by cooker; 08-10-08 at 03:14 PM.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •