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-   -   Roadie Bike Question (http://www.bikeforums.net/clydesdales-athenas-200-lb-91-kg/455366-roadie-bike-question.html)

Jerry in So IL 08-17-08 09:19 PM

Roadie Bike Question
 
Ok, I really like my GT Nomad. But I'm itching to get a road bike bad. Yesterday at the Ramble, I was able to ride a Giant OCR-3 and really liked it. I was wondering if Cannondale or Trek had a similar bike like the OCR-3. I'm wanting some info so I don't look like a dweeb at teh store when I go test drive them. I also don't want to waste time with a model that doesn't even work for me.

I was really saving up for a Surly LHT, but thinking of just getting a bike from the local LBS in Carbondale and putting it in layaway. Should have it out for Spring Training!

BTW I'm keeping my Nomad. Just fits me and I always need a backup.

Jerry

sstorkel 08-17-08 10:10 PM

The OCR is Giant's "relaxed" geometry road bike. In the Cannondale line, the Synapse is probably the equivalent. For Specialized, you'd probably want to look at the Roubaix. Trek's model line-up is so confusing, I'm not sure what you'd need; your LBS should know, however.

Edit: It looks like maybe Trek's Pilot bikes are equivalent to the OCR.

Hill-Pumper 08-17-08 10:32 PM

The comparable model in the Trek is the Pilot 2.1 . If you liked the OCR 3, don't discount it as an option. I personally love my OCR A1 and recommend it to anyone looking at that price range on bikes. I would test ride all of them that I could. I did just that and picked the one that made smile. :D

Jerry in So IL 08-17-08 10:42 PM

I plan on spending the day test riding ALL of them! I can't wait.

I couldn't make heads or tails of Treks website either. Thanks for the info.

I'm REALLY leaning towards the OCR from Giant. I was just wanting to make and compare a few other models from different companies.

BTW, it just freaks me out that those skinny tires can hold that much weight! The OCR that I test rode at the Ramble was owned by a guy that made me look small! And I'm 280! I almost feel sorry for the bike after that ride. But he said that he has put alot of miles on it and the wheels have held up really well. Something to be said about proper tire pressure.

BTW his OCR-3 was yellow, but I see they aren't on the website. Is that a special order color or is it a yearly color?

Jerry

Hill-Pumper 08-17-08 11:16 PM

I would imagine that the yellow paint is year specific, but I can't confirm it. Just so you know, the OCR line has been replaced with the new Defy line for 2009. So, you might be able to grab an OCR as a discontinued model at a savings. :D

Dr_Robert 08-18-08 12:28 AM

I've got an OCR C3, with a few minor upgrades. It's a great bike, and carries my 230 lbs. with no problems, even with 700x23's on the stock wheels.

I really like the "relaxed" geometry. That was a big selling point for me over the TCR series.

-DR

Jerry in So IL 08-18-08 05:24 AM

Always looking for a discount! Thanks for the advise.

Don't really know what is "relaxed" about it, but the OCR didn't feel like I had a hatch handle sticking me in the butt! I felt good in the saddle and steady. I'm glad those who have it like it. Its seems to be a well made bike for the the money range.

Jerry

Jerry in So IL 08-18-08 06:09 AM

For a "relaxed" fit, could I just get some nice drop handle bars for my Nomad and have my LBS do a swap? It would cost less and I do really like my bike. I wouldn't be the fastest on the road, but I could save up even more for next year.

I have 1 5/8" tires on the Nomad now. Could I go to a slicker one for roading?

The reason for the diffent apporoach is that I was thinking of getting a good back wheel built for it anyways, due to the number of flat I'm getting due to my weight. I really like the frame, and was just wondering.

Jerry

Bone Head 08-18-08 07:47 AM

Swapping to drop bars would also require new shifters/brake levers (Brifters?). It may turn into a royal pain.

FWIW, I was in your position last year.....rode a GT Outpost and wanted something more suited for road/group rides. I found my '06 Giant OCR Limited (carbon) in the spring of '07 as a year-end close-out for $1300 (MSRP $1,9000.) I have ridden a few centuries with it and really like this bike !!:love:
I still use the GT Outpost for errands, training and the occasional trail ride.

http://archive.giant-bicycles.com/us...06&model=11445

I'm 5'10" & 240 and have not had any problems with the frame or wheels. No matter which bike you choose, if you keep the stock wheelset, I recommend getting them retensioned/trued after a few hundred miles. This goes a long way to prevent broken spokes. Beefier (higher spoke count) wheels are generally recommended for a clydesdale. Personally, I have had no problems to date with the 20/24 spoke wheels.

Test ride them all and get the bike love. If you love it, you'll ride it!! Best of luck....


EDIT: Yellow OCR3 ....... I'm guessing it was a 2003 model....

Jay68442 08-18-08 07:53 AM

I have a 2006 OCR3 and put many good miles on it. It's really a good bike for the price. I think yellow is an older model, like 2005 or so.

Jerry in So IL 08-18-08 03:47 PM

I was only able to go to one bike shop today, due to the kids getting school supplies and my dental appointment. I went to Wiggs in Benton. Now, this LBS is run by a nice couple. But they have no idea about road bikes. I think I know more, and that ain't much! But they do a nice bussiness with urban bikes and some mtns. They had an older Cannondale there. It was a 12 speed, with down tube ****fers. It looked like new, but its an older one. I was able to fit my wide feet in the toe clips and take it for a spin. I felt like it could have been a little bit taller, but after adjusting the seat a little it worked out better. I think I can adjust the seat back another 3/4" to help out a little more. Anyways, it was a different feel than my Nomad! But I got into a groove and quickly put three miles on it around town very quickly. It just "flowed" it seemed. I was really impressed with it. But I felt a little cramped on it. I didn't know if that was just me not use to riding like that, or if I needed a longer frame. But nothing was hurting or my knees didn't hit my arms or anything. I think some triathon bars on it would help me stretch out more on longer rides.

The thing is a BRIGHT Sea Blue with Pink trim and lettering, but its a Cannondale! The only marking I saw on it was Made in the USA and Shimano 105. Other than those, nothing.

They were asking $350 for it. I would have to/want to get some wider drop bars, tri bars, a Brooks B-17, peddals, brake pads, bar tape. Other than that, she is road ready. So with everything, including free tunup, I should be on the road for less than $600.

I do like it. But I'm going to test ride the OCR to see if they all feel the same or if its just the Cannondale and it itn't my size.

The only bad thing is that my Nomad feels like a tank now when I'm on it!

Jerry

Pinyon 08-18-08 04:33 PM

If you are going to buy a used bike, then I would go with Ebay or Craigslist. I just can't see paying the LBS markup on a used bike like that. The frame warranty is void on used bikes anyway. Why spend more?

I also liked the OCR series of bikes. It was close between the OCR1 and the Specialized Allez Elite for me this last spring. I ended up getting the Specialized, mostly because that bike shop has a stellar reputation.

Be careful getting an old aluminum-framed 12-speed bike. That era of wheel rims come out of true something terrible (clydes almost always have to replace them with tougher rims), and the back end only accepts 126 mm wide hubs and freewheels (no cassettes, or modern 130 mm wide hub parts). So you are stuck having to shop for "vintage" or compliant parts in the future. This is especially true for just about anything that you need to replace on the drivetrain, besides the front cogs and chain. As things wear out over time, it can get expensive very quickly. I have an old Trek from that era, and still love it, but the parts just became too expensive for me to use it for everyday riding anymore.

Good luck test riding those bikes! Pick out what feels good.


Jerry in So IL 08-18-08 05:05 PM

Thanks for the info Pinyon. I never thought of it like that.

Jerry

Fern53 08-18-08 06:07 PM

I have been researching road bikes with "relaxed geometry" as well. At my local LBS this weekend, I was told (if you have any interest in Specialized) their Sequoia line and (higher end) Roubaix models fit that description. Unfortunately they didn't have any in my size, but I am planning to try them out when they restock in a few weeks.

Jerry in So IL 08-18-08 06:23 PM

I just got off the phone with some LBSs in Carbondale. WOW the prices!
1)OCR-3 starting at $699, OCR-2 $899.
2)Specialized Roubaix $1600 for the Basic and $1950 for the Elite.
3)Trek 520 was $1150.

These make the LHT, $1000 shipped, an affordable option.

Jerry

Bigboxeraf 08-18-08 06:32 PM

Don't rule out tradional goemetry road bikes. I'm much happier on my Trek Madone than I was on my LeMond Versailles. My torso is long and my legs are short. I'm 5'10" 260. The LHT is nice I think I'm picking one up next year; but it's a tour bike It rides like a tour bike and you seem like you have road bike fever.

sstorkel 08-18-08 07:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jerry in So IL (Post 7298057)
I just got off the phone with some LBSs in Carbondale. WOW the prices!
1)OCR-3 starting at $699, OCR-2 $899.
2)Specialized Roubaix $1600 for the Basic and $1950 for the Elite.
3)Trek 520 was $1150.

These make the LHT, $1000 shipped, an affordable option.

Jerry

The Roubaix has a carbon fiber frame and much better components than the other bikes you mention, which is why it is considerably more expensive. The Giant OCR-3 and OCR-2 are aluminum. The Trek 520 is a chro-moly touring bike, similar to the Surly Long Haul Trucker. If you want a cheaper Specialized bike, take a look at the Sequoia. Or the Specialized Allez if you want a more aggressive geometry. The low-end Cannondale Synapse models are also aluminum.

FWIW, I would suggest riding at least 10 and preferably 20 miles before buying a bike with an aluminum frame. I find that inexpensive aluminum frames tend to have a fairly harsh ride, which you really start to notice as your ride distance builds...

Jay68442 08-18-08 07:48 PM

I just purchased a Specialized Roubaix Elite to replace my OCR3. Both great bikes but as sstorkel said the specialized has much better components and is carbon fiber . My OCR3 is up for sale if your looking for a good used bike. It's a 2006 blue/white size M.

sstorkel 08-18-08 08:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jay68442 (Post 7298636)
I just purchased a Specialized Roubaix Elite to replace my OCR3. Both great bikes but as sstorkel said the specialized has much better components and is carbon fiber . My OCR3 is up for sale if your looking for a good used bike. It's a 2006 blue/white size M.

Nice! I've been thinking about buying a Roubaix Pro frameset. I've got a fairly new Ultegra drivetrain on my current bike, but the harsh ride starts to get to me after about 40 miles...

Jay68442 08-18-08 09:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sstorkel (Post 7298826)
Nice! I've been thinking about buying a Roubaix Pro frameset. I've got a fairly new Ultegra drivetrain on my current bike, but the harsh ride starts to get to me after about 40 miles...

I did a metric century yesterday on the Roubaix, one word Smoooooth.

Jerry in So IL 08-19-08 03:40 PM

I can see now that I need to get the CEO, aka The Wife, in a close door meeting and beg for more of the budget!

Jerry

Jerry in So IL 08-19-08 03:53 PM

Road Bike vs Touring Bike? What excactly is the differance? I'm wanting to haul a bunch of weight, aka me, a long ways. I don't really care about breaking records or "winning", I just want to finish a few local centuries and commute to work on Saturdays.

Enlighten me please.

Jerry

dscheidt 08-19-08 04:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jerry in So IL (Post 7304368)
Road Bike vs Touring Bike? What excactly is the differance? I'm wanting to haul a bunch of weight, aka me, a long ways. I don't really care about breaking records or "winning", I just want to finish a few local centuries and commute to work on Saturdays.

Enlighten me please.

Jerry

Touring bikes are built for touring. They tend to have slightly longer wheelbase, which gives better ride, and lets you mount paniers without worrying about heel strike so much. They take bigger tires, have provision for fenders (the LHT can take 700X40-something tires with fenders.), racks, water bottle cages, and stuff like that. They tend to have the rider a bit more upright (bars even with saddle, plus or minus) and slightly less steep head tube angle. The gearing tends a bit lower, the better for steep climbs and all day touring, at the expense of not being able to go quite as fast. They don't usually have brifters.

Some of that, like gearing and shifter choice, are easy to change (though maybe expensive, if you buy a pre-built bike) others, like fender fittings, and brakes that clear wide tires isn't.

krazygluon 08-19-08 05:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bigboxeraf (Post 7298104)
Don't rule out tradional goemetry road bikes. I'm much happier on my Trek Madone than I was on my LeMond Versailles. My torso is long and my legs are short. I'm 5'10" 260. The LHT is nice I think I'm picking one up next year; but it's a tour bike It rides like a tour bike and you seem like you have road bike fever.

+1

I kinda regret going for the Pilot 1.2 over the 1200 now that I'm doing more recreational road riding instead of semi-urban commuting.

Jerry in So IL 08-19-08 05:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dscheidt (Post 7304575)
Touring bikes are built for touring. They tend to have slightly longer wheelbase, which gives better ride, and lets you mount paniers without worrying about heel strike so much. They take bigger tires, have provision for fenders (the LHT can take 700X40-something tires with fenders.), racks, water bottle cages, and stuff like that. They tend to have the rider a bit more upright (bars even with saddle, plus or minus) and slightly less steep head tube angle. The gearing tends a bit lower, the better for steep climbs and all day touring, at the expense of not being able to go quite as fast. They don't usually have brifters.

Some of that, like gearing and shifter choice, are easy to change (though maybe expensive, if you buy a pre-built bike) others, like fender fittings, and brakes that clear wide tires isn't.

Ok, so a touring bike is basicly an upgrade from my Hybrid, but not really built for speed trails. I can live with that. I have more hills around here anyways.

BTW, what are brifters?

Jerry


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