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-   -   Do you cross train? (http://www.bikeforums.net/clydesdales-athenas-200-lb-91-kg/456036-do-you-cross-train.html)

Barrettscv 08-19-08 02:35 PM

Do you cross train?
 
Cycling has taken me from a sedentary lifestyle to a more active and more healthful existence. I look forward to cycling but feel like I should broaden my fitness range.

I am also becoming concerned that I'll soon be unable to make meaningful gains is muscle strength, endurance potential and weight loss.

Cross training offers a solution to these problems. What has been your experience?

Sincerely,

Michael

Tom Stormcrowe 08-19-08 02:50 PM

Crosstraining is always good. If you concentrate on only one exercise, your body adapts to it rather quickly.

Jerry in So IL 08-19-08 03:33 PM

I bike and do a HIT workout. They help me lose weight and build muscle. I don't do any other sport due to the OT and the kids into stuff. Wouldn't mind adult volleyball.

Jerry

Richard_Rides 08-19-08 05:34 PM

I lift weights three times a week. I only work biceps, triceps and pecs. No need to go crazy.

uncadan8 08-19-08 05:43 PM

During the summer, I focus primarily on cycling, but once the cooler weather starts, I transition into weight training, a little running, and walking. Once the snow flies, I hit the slopes for some skiing or snowboarding. I also like to get for some hiking now and then all year long.

krazygluon 08-19-08 06:47 PM

I want to cross train, but can't frikkin stand running (all the weight of a clydesdale without the hooves er ankles to match)

I don't really see weight training as cross training unless its mostly leg workouts, and those just don't appeal to me.

I was halfway thinking about hitting the stairmaster in hopes of improving my stand-up climbing. anybody else?

BlankTim 08-19-08 07:19 PM

I'm going to start cross training once it gets too cold and nasty to ride.
I'm sort of thinking about getting the P90X system mostly for the diet plan, but the exercises can only help. It's a bit more money than I want to spend, but for me, having an organized system is the only real way to be successful.
Of course, I'm open to other systems and ideas as well. I just haven't seen anything that doesn't require more of a time and financial investment.

lil brown bat 08-19-08 07:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Barrettscv (Post 7303958)
I am also becoming concerned that I'll soon be unable to make meaningful gains is muscle strength, endurance potential and weight loss.

Cross training offers a solution to these problems. What has been your experience?

I guess I'd say that crosstraining can help, but only if you sit down and define what you mean by "meaningful gains". Muscle strength and endurance potential as measured by what? For what purpose? Do you want to be able to lift some arbitrary amount of weight, or do you just want to generically be "stronger" and have better "endurance", or is there some specific thing that you want to do (climb some mountain, go on some trip, take up some new sport) that will require greater muscle strength and endurance potential?

I'm a believer in functional fitness. My motivation for getting fit is to be better able to do things I like, such as skiing, aikido, tennis, whitewater kayaking, hiking, etc. As such, those aren't "crosstraining" for me, they're the goal. So, my "crosstraining" is quite a bit different from someone who starts out with activity A but then "crosstrains" in activity B for some ultimate goal that has nothing per se to do with either of those activities. In a nutshell, if your goal is "fitness" for its own sake and as defined by some arbitrary criteria, you're looking for one type of workout; if your goal is performance, you're looking for a different (functional) workout.

flip18436572 08-19-08 08:42 PM

Cross training is good, as long as you know what you really plan on gaining or losing. Swimming, running, elliptical, rowing, etc... for aerobic work outs, but most people leave out weight lifting for some reason. Weight lifting is good for your body as long as it is done correctly.

I do all the above, except for rowing, as it is not something that works well with my tail bone for some reason. It is me, and not the equipment, as others can row for an hour without any problems.

I also do ball routines, crunches, etc......

Do what works for you. I want to try YOGA, but have to find a place that does it. Our YMCA stopped doing it, because of a lack of interest.

DnvrFox 08-19-08 09:40 PM

Typical routine:

This morning - 15 laps in a 25 meter pool, 18 mile bike ride

Yesterday - Workout with weights, 35 mile bike ride

A couple of days ago - Swiim, weights, bike ride.

I also stretch daily.

Etc, etc.

Goals?

I don't have any specific goals, and I don't want any. I lift weights, swim, bicycle and walk because I LIKE to do those things, and they make me feel good and make me strong, and able to do lots of things.

In the winter time, I do more walking, but continue the swimming, weight lifting, and I do more spinning classes, and ride when I can.

I try to get 2-3 hours of vigorous, varied exercise in daily.

I think it is sad that some folks have to have a "goal" for everything. What's wrong with doing things just because you enjoy them?

I am so pleased that I started swimming last December. It has added a whole new dimension. I love to see my progress and improvement over the past few months!

Next summer I hope to be able to do an "aquabike" - a combination of bicycling and swimming. Not to compete, just to complete!

uncadan8 08-20-08 04:50 AM

Totally agree, DnvrFox! I like to go snowboarding because it is fun. I have no goals for it, other than that it keeps me in good shape through the winter and beats riding the Vomit Comet all winter long. I set some goals for cycling, but they are more like "Keep up with my (MUCH) faster friends." Setting a goal like averaging 25.273 mph on a ride is not that important to me anymore. It just took the fun out things. That is not to say, however, that I don't try to get better on the bike all the time. I guess I just define the results a little bit differently now.

Quote:

Originally Posted by DnvrFox (Post 7306288)
Typical routine:

This morning - 15 laps in a 25 meter pool, 18 mile bike ride

Yesterday - Workout with weights, 35 mile bike ride

A couple of days ago - Swiim, weights, bike ride.

Etc, etc.

Goals?

I don't have any specific goals, and I don't want any. I lift weights, swim, bicycle and walk because I LIKE to do those things, and they make me feel good and make me strong, and able to do lots of things.

In the winter time, I do more walking, but continue the swimming, weight lifting, and I do more spinning classes, and ride when I can.

I think it is sad that some folks have to have a "goal" for everything. What's wrong with doing things just because you enjoy them?

I am so pleased that I started swimming last December. It has added a whole new dimension. I love to see my progress and improvement over the past few months!

Next summer I hope to be able to do an "aquabike" - a combination of bicycling and swimming. Not to compete, just to complete!


Big Scott 08-20-08 06:21 AM

I workout in the gym during lunch and focus on core as well as cardio (stairmaster, spin classes) I also lift heavy weights. I'll ramp up my running and swimming game when I shed some more LB's. I'll be doing my 3'rd Ironman in 2010 so that is my ultimate goal but for now I'm racing road as well as MTB's. I thought "Cross" training was when you ride the cross bike?? ;) Most of my friends are gearing up for the cross season, I plan to race track next year since I'm told I would do well, I don't have a cross bike so I will not be jumping over hurdles with my bike over my shoulder anytime soon.

I try to have fun in whatever I'm doing even when I'm drooling over the bars trying to pull a pack at 30+.

-Scott

arleban 08-20-08 07:07 AM

Just started the biking, but since April or so I've been working on an elliptical machine about 2-3x/week and doing bodyweight exercises. Nothing major, but push-ups, sit-ups, squats.

I've been trying to work on my "lower abs" more as I've noticed my posture is off. It's like my legs go up to hips in a straight line, but then my upper body...sags slightly forward right at the hips/spine and then is normal. I noticed that when I consciously tighten my lower abs it pulls my hips under my upper body and I'm in normal body position. Odd.

lil brown bat 08-20-08 07:13 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DnvrFox (Post 7306288)
I think it is sad that some folks have to have a "goal" for everything. What's wrong with doing things just because you enjoy them?

I think it is sad that some folks feel the need to disparage others' way of doing things, while at the same time demonstrating that they haven't really bothered to understand the rationale behind these goals that others have articulated. No one has said that they have a "goal" for everything, but in fact, that is how some people approach life, and it's not necessarily a bad way to be -- it's just how they're wired and it works for them. Calling that "sad" is condescending.

Most of us don't have a goal for everything; instead we set goals in the areas of our lives where we calculate they will do the most good. Doing things just because you enjoy them is great; OTOH, there are some things that present enough of a challenge that it would be foolish to try and just go out and do them because they sound like fun. Someone who thinks it sounds like fun to climb Mount Whitney, and who just diddy-bops off to do it, without adequate preparation, isn't a spontaneous soul in touch with the joy of life -- that person is what you call a "fool". If you want to climb Mount Whitney, or even do any number of things that, while considerably less daunting, are currently beyond your current abilities, you better set some goals. Otherwise, as we say in the backcountry, "if you can't be a good example, you'll just have to be a horrible reminder."

DnvrFox 08-20-08 07:54 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lil brown bat (Post 7307725)
I think it is sad that some folks feel the need to disparage others' way of doing things, while at the same time demonstrating that they haven't really bothered to understand the rationale behind these goals that others have articulated.

OK, I guess we are both sad for each other! I didn't mean to disparage, but I also am concerned when someone seems to lay the "we have to have goals" philosophy on others, as if we all operate the same.

Your statement

I guess I'd say that crosstraining can help, but only if you sit down and define what you mean by "meaningful gains". Muscle strength and endurance potential as measured by what? For what purpose? Do you want to be able to lift some arbitrary amount of weight, or do you just want to generically be "stronger" and have better "endurance", or is there some specific thing that you want to do (climb some mountain, go on some trip, take up some new sport) that will require greater muscle strength and endurance potential?

comes across pretty "heavy." I think cross training can help, even if I DON'T define meaningful gains. You know, I don't want to sit down and define anything right now, despite your saying I have to. And I think it could be discouraging to those who just want to exercise for the pure pleasure. Your statement represents your philosophy, which is fine, but I don't buy it for myself.

I would propose that the "You gotta have goals" philosophy is one of the factors discouraging (or at least, not encouraging) a large number of sedentary folks from exercising. How much better - "Find a physical activity you like and just enjoy doing it."

And, yes, if I was to climb Mt Whitney (oops - I think I could do that right now) - but perhaps Mt. McKinley, then I would agree that goal setting would be important.

However, I have no desire to climb Mt. Mckinley at the moment.

lil brown bat 08-20-08 08:36 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DnvrFox (Post 7307925)
OK, I guess we are both sad for each other! I didn't mean to disparage, but I also am concerned when someone seems to lay the "we have to have goals" philosophy on others, as if we all operate the same.

I could be missing something, but I don't see anywhere where anyone "seems to lay the 'we have to have goals' philosophy on others". Perhaps you can provide a cite.

Quote:

Originally Posted by DnvrFox (Post 7307925)
Your statement

I guess I'd say that crosstraining can help, but only if you sit down and define what you mean by "meaningful gains". Muscle strength and endurance potential as measured by what? For what purpose? Do you want to be able to lift some arbitrary amount of weight, or do you just want to generically be "stronger" and have better "endurance", or is there some specific thing that you want to do (climb some mountain, go on some trip, take up some new sport) that will require greater muscle strength and endurance potential?

comes across pretty "heavy." I think cross training can help, even if I DON'T define meaningful gains.

I hate to take the wind out of your sails, but I was responding to another participant in this thread who used the phrase "meaningful goals", not to you. I'm not sure exactly why you felt the need to respond as if that phrase were directed at you, because it wasn't. If it doesn't make any sense in connection with you and your life, that's not surprising, because it had nothing to do with you.

Quote:

Originally Posted by DnvrFox (Post 7307925)
You know, I don't want to sit down and define anything right now, despite your saying I have to.

Oh, come now. I said no such thing.

Quote:

Originally Posted by DnvrFox (Post 7307925)
And I think it could be discouraging to those who just want to exercise for the pure pleasure. Your statement represents your philosophy, which is fine, but I don't buy it for myself.

Again, I could be missing something, but I don't believe I prefaced my statement with "THIS IS MY PERSONAL PHILOSOPHY TA DAAA". I also don't recall being appointed Provider of Encouragement to Those Who Just Want to Exercise for the Pure Pleasure.

Quote:

Originally Posted by DnvrFox (Post 7307925)
I would propose that the "You gotta have goals" philosophy is one of the factors discouraging (or at least, not encouraging) a large number of sedentary folks from exercising. How much better - "Find a physical activity you like and just enjoy doing it."

Ah, so your "personal philosophy" is universally good, and other people's suck. Well, okay...there's only one problem: your attack on "the 'You gotta have goals' philosophy" is a strawman argument.

Quote:

Originally Posted by DnvrFox (Post 7307925)
And, yes, if I was to climb Mt Whitney (oops - I think I could do that right now) - but perhaps Mt. McKinley, then I would agree that goal setting would be important.

However, I have no desire to climb Mt. Mckinley at the moment.

Yes, of course McKinley is what I meant. You don't want to do it. Other people do. It was provided as an example of when goal-setting is not just important but essential.

Question: why the evident need to disparage those who set goals?

cod.peace 08-20-08 09:24 AM

Get yourself a kettlebell or three: www.russiankettlebells.com

DnvrFox 08-20-08 09:40 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lil brown bat (Post 7308252)
I hate to take the wind out of your sails, but I was responding to another participant in this thread who used the phrase "meaningful goals", not to you.

<snip>

Question: why the evident need to disparage those who set goals?

I don't equate "disparaging" with "I think it is sad that ," but if you do, I apologize.

Anything written on the forum is subject to comments (and interpretation) by others. That is the nature of forums.

So, if you want to avoid this, send your comments via email or PM.

Black Shuck 08-20-08 10:25 AM

I try to get our running at least once, oreferrably twice a week, and my job involves 8 hours of standing up and quite a bit of lifting :-)

Also borrow my moms dog for long walks but as he's getting old and spolied the pace isn't all that high ;-)

biffstephens 08-20-08 10:40 AM

I have been running lately. Worked up to a 5K and now a bit more. I might do a 1/2 this winter if I can. I think the running help in many ways...breaks up my biking....helps my cardio and doesn't hurt in the weight loss area either.

I have been strictly a biker for a few years and I think the running has really helped my overall fitness for sure...

If my biking starts to suffer I will have to find something else though...I might look at doing a duathlon or 2 in the future. We will see..

BikEthan 08-20-08 02:47 PM

I was gaining weight and nearing the 250 lb mark. Not really that much compared to a lot of people on this forum but it was a bit of a wake up call for me when my BMI was calling me "Obese" even if BMI isn't a good indicator of overall health or of weight problems.

So I started riding more, going to a rock climbing gym, and doing Crossfit. Crossfit is a bit crazy, very hard (especially at first). But there's an awesome community and they keep me coming back. I've never been able to stick with a gym routine before, I'd get bored, and distracted and just get out of the habit. I've lost 35 lbs, gained a lot of muscle and I'm a MUCH stronger cyclist for it. My endurance, and strength have both improved a great deal. I'm also having fewer issues with my joints and back. I've got nothing on Big Scott for sure (doubt I could pull a pack at 30+ if the "pack" was a bunch of hungry cheetahs coming to dine on me). But I'm improving and able to do more of the things I like to do without undue consequences.

cyclokitty 08-20-08 05:15 PM

I swim typically 5 days a week for a half an hour each session. My building's pool is pretty small (15 metres or so in length) so I head off to the community pool and swim the longer laps every couple of weeks or so (the pool is 25 m in length).

I also go to the gym a couple of days a week for strength training. Haven't gone for the past month though because they are closed for renovations, and their other gym is in a grimy mall where I'd rather not park by bike. I've been comped three months fees since they are re-opening in September.

Goals? I'm thinking about triathlons. I read an interesting book "Slow Fat Triathlete" by Jayne Williams and it's encouraging the idea. The community centre near me has a running/walking track and that'll come in handy in the winter.

Also I'd like to never think twice about riding uphills.

I want to go on a bike tour. So I need to build more endurance for hauling gear, and to ride up unknown hills.

late 08-20-08 05:43 PM

I have to cross train. In the summer, along with the riding I walk once a week.
I walk around the block. Of course, my block is over 5 miles around and has a mountain in it. But you get the idea.

With Fall coming up I am thinking about going back to the gym. I get ready for snow shoveling, and for next year's riding. There are so many different things you can do there, it really needs a seperate post.

I have a Kurt Kinetic trainer at home, and a Concept 2 rower. Last winter my weeks went like this.. Ride, shovel, row, day off....shovel,row,ride,day off..
I know, the excitement never stops...

Condorita 08-20-08 07:33 PM

Walk 5-6 days per week. Ride 5-6 days per week. Try to get to the gym for strength training at least twice a week (ideally 3 times per week), and other gym visits (if I get any) are spent on the elliptical.

coop218 08-20-08 07:52 PM

Does hiking count as cross training?
http://i295.photobucket.com/albums/m...c/IMG_0504.jpg


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