Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 09-02-08, 06:45 PM   #1
nobull60
Bull
Thread Starter
 
nobull60's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Bikes:
Posts: 41
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Numb Hands

Been riding for a year now. I'm 6'2" and went from 315 to 250 and still want to loose about 20 more. I'm not a fat guy anymore but large frame and wide shoulders. 48yrs old and just went from a Hybrid to a true road bike. Bought a GIANT Defy and love the look, stlye and speed. My question is since I got the road bike I am leaning more and seem to loose feeling in my hands after 20 miles or so. I have to sit up and shake them to get the feeling back. Any thoughts? I was fitted by a professional at the local bike shop where I have a great relationship and have bought three bikes from but he's telling me it will go away after I get use to it just as I did with my rear end in the saddle pain. Thanks and I just love riding...anyone calls me a Clydesdale and I'll smile and watch their skinny butt run when I tell them to come closer and repeat themselves.Love the site and love the sport. Give a big guy a break or else!!!

Last edited by nobull60; 09-02-08 at 06:50 PM.
nobull60 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-08, 06:56 PM   #2
Bigboxeraf
Senior Member
 
Bigboxeraf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Brooklyn
Bikes: Trek Madone 5.9sl
Posts: 144
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
1) gloves with good gel padding everyone likes the specilized body geometry series. I have the Trek Version. If your hands still go numb move your seat back a bit to take the weight off your hands a bit.
Bigboxeraf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-08, 10:41 PM   #3
abbynemmy
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: East Tawas, MI
Bikes:
Posts: 126
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Here is a quick check. Put your bike in a trainer or have someone hold it up for you. Sit on the bike with your feet on the pedals, crank arms parallel with the ground. Put your hands on the hoods. Now let go with your hands. If you have to strain to hold yourself up you have to much weight on your hands. Adjust your seat forwards or back until you can let go without straining. I hope that makes sense.
abbynemmy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-08, 10:51 PM   #4
mjfwk
It's all about the bike
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Canberra, Australia
Bikes:
Posts: 10
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bigboxeraf View Post
1) gloves with good gel padding everyone likes the specilized body geometry series. I have the Trek Version. If your hands still go numb move your seat back a bit to take the weight off your hands a bit.
Moving the seat back without adjusting bar height has the potential to increase weight on the hands. But good gloves are a 'must have'.

As for the 'it will go away' comment from the professional... The problem will either be carpal tunnel (compression) or ulnar neuropathy (otherwise known as 'handlebar palsy', and often linked to vibration).

Do you cycle with straight arms? If not, consider a shorter stem or raise the stem to move some weight off the arms/hands.
mjfwk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-08, 03:53 AM   #5
LarDasse74
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Grid Reference, SK
Bikes: I never learned to ride a bike. It is my deepest shame.
Posts: 3,769
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I have no luck with gloves (stopped using em over a decade ago).

I find usually the problem with numb hands is cause by the saddle position... most people angle their saddle nose-down to keep the saddle from stabbing them in the taint. However, this allows your weight to slide forward and you have to push harder against the bars to counter, resulting in pain or numbness.

If the saddle is set level or slightly noe up this will stop.

If angling the saddle level or slightly nose up is uncomfortable, get a new saddle... or possibly adjust the height (too high will put excess pressure on your arse).
LarDasse74 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-08, 07:01 AM   #6
thump55
I got 99 problems....
 
thump55's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Does anyone know where the love of God goes, when the waves turn the minutes to hours?
Bikes:
Posts: 2,087
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
You may want to try to temporarily wrap your bar tops a little bigger, and try it. It adds padding (like gloves), and it opens your grip up to a larger diameter (gloves do this too, because of the material in the glove palm). Sometimes just a small adjustment in diameter is all it takes to help the numbness. I don't know that it ever completely goes away, but you should be able to make it better. The thin, white packing foam works good for a trial run. Bigger bar tape isn't as sexy cool, but neither are tan lines from gloves....
thump55 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-08, 08:39 AM   #7
Longfemur
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Bikes:
Posts: 1,936
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Sit up and shake those hands out more often, and move them around on the bars. That's what the different hand positions are for. If that isn't enough, you may have to have a look at your position. Too low, too high, maybe too close or too far... but probably your saddle needs to go back a bit for better weight distribution.
Longfemur is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-08, 08:47 AM   #8
piper_chuck
Senior Member
 
piper_chuck's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Columbia, SC
Bikes:
Posts: 562
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
+1 on moving around more as the first suggestion. A road bike offers several positions for the hands. Using a variety reduces the likelyhood of numb hands.
piper_chuck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-08, 09:16 AM   #9
CliftonGK1
Senior Member
 
CliftonGK1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Columbus, OH
Bikes: '08 Surly Cross-Check, 2011 Redline Conquest Pro, 2012 Spesh FSR Comp EVO, 2015 Trek Domane 6.2 disc
Posts: 11,380
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by abbynemmy View Post
Here is a quick check. Put your bike in a trainer or have someone hold it up for you. Sit on the bike with your feet on the pedals, crank arms parallel with the ground. Put your hands on the hoods. Now let go with your hands. If you have to strain to hold yourself up you have to much weight on your hands. Adjust your seat forwards or back until you can let go without straining. I hope that makes sense.
+1

This was one of the big points that my fitter checked, every single time we adjusted any other measurements.
Moved the seat? Check the reach.
Changed the stem height? Check the reach.
Angled the seat? Check the reach.
He was very insistant that I keep checking that I didn't have to "push" myself upright from a position on the hoods, since I was getting fitted for long distance riding.
You should be balanced between your contact points: Saddle, bars and pedals. No one point should be going sore or numb with the expectation that you'll "get used to it." If you get used to something being numb, then you're doing permanent damage. The only ride I've done all year where anything went numb was a double century, and I discovered that I need different shoes for doing 13+ hours on the bike.

Quote:
Originally Posted by nobull60
Thanks and I just love riding...anyone calls me a Clydesdale and I'll smile and watch their skinny butt run when I tell them to come closer and repeat
Why? Clydesdale isn't some derogatory slur. Be proud of the fact that you're doing the same ride as guys half your size.
CliftonGK1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-08, 09:21 AM   #10
Neil_B
Guest
 
Bikes:
Posts: n/a
Mentioned: Post(s)
Tagged: Thread(s)
Quoted: Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by CliftonGK1 View Post
You should be balanced between your contact points: Saddle, bars and pedals. No one point should be going sore or numb with the expectation that you'll "get used to it." If you get used to something being numb, then you're doing permanent damage. The only ride I've done all year where anything went numb was a double century, and I discovered that I need different shoes for doing 13+ hours on the bike.
Could you elaborate on that last comment? Why did you need different shoes for endurance riding, and what did they recommend?
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-08, 09:57 AM   #11
CliftonGK1
Senior Member
 
CliftonGK1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Columbus, OH
Bikes: '08 Surly Cross-Check, 2011 Redline Conquest Pro, 2012 Spesh FSR Comp EVO, 2015 Trek Domane 6.2 disc
Posts: 11,380
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Historian View Post
Could you elaborate on that last comment? Why did you need different shoes for endurance riding, and what did they recommend?
Well, no one recommended anything, and I'm still looking at shoes. What had happened was 3 toes on either foot went numb and didn't recover full feeling until about 4 days later. It was from my feet sliding forward in my shoes and repeatedly jamming my toes against the front of the shoe.
Right now I wear Forte CM220 MTB shoes which only have 2 straps to close them. I think I need to move to a 3 strap shoe for distance to better distribute pressure over the top of my foot, allowing me to more securely hold my foot in place inside the shoe without getting hot-spots.
I'm fine with riding 100 - 125 miles in these shoes, but past that I start getting some toe numbness issues if I have the straps loose enough that I don't get hot-spots.
__________________
"I feel like my world was classier before I found cyclocross."
- Mandi M.
CliftonGK1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-08, 10:09 AM   #12
MX_2_Spandex
Former Doughnut lover
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Dallas, TX
Bikes: Intense Spider FRO MTB, Specialized S-Works Roubaix
Posts: 71
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I have had the same issue with hand numbness. I found when I adjusted the seat forward a little and adjusted the angle it got a lot better. Even with perfect sizing on your bike, if you don't move your hands frequently they will go numb a bit. I try to move mine every 3-5 minutes or so...
MX_2_Spandex is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-04-08, 04:58 PM   #13
puckpack
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Bikes:
Posts: 101
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Is it possible to get numbness/soreness in one hand? My right hand is killing me but I am not sure if it is from biking.

Wow, looking at what I wrote that could be taken poorly! I really do have a sore right hand/ wrist, honest!
puckpack is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-04-08, 07:52 PM   #14
piper_chuck
Senior Member
 
piper_chuck's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Columbia, SC
Bikes:
Posts: 562
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by puckpack View Post
Is it possible to get numbness/soreness in one hand? My right hand is killing me but I am not sure if it is from biking.

Wow, looking at what I wrote that could be taken poorly! I really do have a sore right hand/ wrist, honest!
That reminds me of a joke about tennis elbow, but since I don't know who might be reading, I'll link to it instead of posting it here. That way anyone easily offended can just choose to not click this link
piper_chuck is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:57 AM.