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-   Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) (http://www.bikeforums.net/clydesdales-athenas-200-lb-91-kg/)
-   -   Building wheels to hold me. (http://www.bikeforums.net/clydesdales-athenas-200-lb-91-kg/473951-building-wheels-hold-me.html)

Amani576 10-06-08 03:34 PM

Building wheels to hold me.
 
Ok, so I usually spend my time on the C&V forums, and some of you may know me here (I'm still "new" around here). I recently got an 87' Panasonic DX-6000 Frameset. Now, I'm 19, about 5' 10",and weigh about 220-230 (Not sure about it, but don't look my weight). It's a lightweight steel frame and I don't really have too many worries about the frame itself holding up. But, I am wondering how I should build the wheels to carry my heft. I want the wheels to be relatively lightweight and strong. Weight is last though. I was planning on using Mavic Open Pro's to build them, but, can't find any details on whether or not they'll hold a rider of my weight. I'm also planning 3-cross with butted spokes of some sort (haven't decided on DT or Wheelsmith yet), and possibly tying the drive side spokes. Hub? Haven't decided yet, but, I'm building for quality here and that will definitely follow. This is sort of a long term project (hopefully not too long though, I really wanna ride this thing) so I may lose, or possibly gain *gulp* a few pounds by the time it's done, but, does this sound like a wheel that will be able to hold me and last a good while? I know proper maintenance and what not has to do with how long a wheel truly lasts, but, you get my point.
This is my first bike build and any other advice on building a bike that can hold a 200lb+ rider would be great (I know, look around on here too).
Thanks all... sorry if it was a little long-winded though.
GR

CliftonGK1 10-06-08 03:50 PM

230? Dude, you're a lightweight! Open Pro 32h rims laced 3 cross to Ultegra hubs and you're golden. You can use butted or straight gauge spokes and you'll be fine.

I'm just south of 250, and I've been as heavy as 270, and never rode anything more than 32 spokes. Currently I'm rolling an Alex DA16 to a Deore hub in back, and a DT RR1.1 to a SON28 hub in front. Both 3x with DT Champion 2.0 spokes, both 32h.

Mr. Beanz 10-06-08 04:03 PM

I myself have had nothing but bad luck with Mavic OP's 32 3 X...Noisy, pulled out the eyelets,splitting brake surface. Never more than 10 months out of a rear wheel pro built by different builders. Just my experience at 230 lbs.

Velocity Deep V in rear is Strong, but heavy. I don't care about wieght weeneie stuff. Only thing that slows me down is Ben and Jerry's ice cream. 15,000 miles on my current wheel, still rolling true.

If I want to save weight, I'd use a Mavic CXP 33 or similar. Have one on the front end of my roadie, seemes very solid.

late 10-06-08 04:06 PM

Mavic CXP33 rims are almost indestructible. Way tougher than the Open Pros and will live years longer. I like Ultegra, but most any Shimano will do.

Steve530 10-06-08 04:09 PM

I think the conventional wisdom is that us "larger people" should run on deep V rims with 36 holes laced 3X or 4X.

That said, I had a set of 32 h Mavic Open Pro rims laced with DT db spokes to low flange Campagnolo NR hubs this summer. I don't have a lot of miles on the wheels (like 50), but they seem to be very strong. I have not broken a spoke and the wheels have stayed true even though I've riden some rougher than average roads with them.

Mr. Beanz 10-06-08 04:11 PM

Tying the driveside spokes? You mean as in solder together? Why would you do that? The wheels will need a retension after a couple hundred miles.

I've had several builders build wheels for me. All said the loctite would hold and everyone swore the spokes would not lose tension. Yeah right! Especially at our weight!

Mr. Beanz 10-06-08 04:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Steve530 (Post 7614276)
I think the conventional wisdom is that us "larger people" should run on deep V rims with 36 holes laced 3X or 4X.


36 is overkill! 32 3X is good. I have 15,000 miles on my Deep V with not one touch of a wrench after the inital retension at breakin period. 220-245 lbs.:thumb:

Steve530 10-06-08 04:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mr. Beanz (Post 7614312)
36 is overkill! 32 3X is good. I have 15,000 miles on my Deep V with not one touch of a wrench after the inital retension at breakin period. 220-245 lbs.:thumb:

I guess the bike mechanic who told me that was being conservative. :)

jaxgtr 10-06-08 05:40 PM

36 for 230 is over kill. 36 for 300 is not :p

Mr. Beanz 10-06-08 05:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jaxgtr (Post 7614861)
36 for 230 is over kill. 36 for 300 is not :p

My thoughts (not that anyone cares) is that the 36 hole hub flange has a little less meat between the holes. Not as strong as the 32 hub. I could be wrong but I had a friend that insisted on 36 at 230 lbs. He broke the section between holes about a week after I had the thoughts!....In other words, don't make me wish you to the cornfields:eek:

Amani576 10-06-08 05:52 PM

Not that I'm going to, but, what would be the least amount of spokes I could use? And would doing a radial lacing up front be bad? I kinda like the look of 0-cross but, I know it has serious downfalls if you ride on anything other than smooth ground and doesn't hold a true as well as even a 1-cross.
I'm gonna keep it symmetrically laced (front and back, not DS and NDS, although, that would be symetrical too...) and probably to Dura-Ace hubs since I'm building it up with Dura-Ace 7700.
Thanks for the answers so far guys. I'd go with Deep-V's except that I can't stand the look of them. I like deep-section rims, but, only when they're actually needed for aerodynamics. I'm also trying to keep the bike at the weight it was when it was built, if not lighter, at 22lbs. I'm no weight weenie, but, I'm trying to keep it light-er as this bike should be.
GR

jaxgtr 10-06-08 05:58 PM

I don't think the front is nearly a big of deal as the rear. I think you could easily go with 28 on the front, maybe even 24. When I had my Deep V done, the other option for me was the CXP33. The builder told me either option was good.

Mr. Beanz 10-06-08 06:00 PM

Depp V's aren't actually for aerodynamics. More about the durability rec's in this forum. My thoughts are, how long do you want the wheel to last?..............Sounds like you have your mind set. Fewer spokes, liteweight etc.

BTW, some of the most powerful fast riders I've ridden with use Deep V types. I know plenty with lite wheels that can't pull a lick!:D

late 10-06-08 06:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Amani576 (Post 7614956)
Not that I'm going to, but, what would be the least amount of spokes I could use
GR

Standard build... 32 spokes, 3 cross

Amani576 10-06-08 06:17 PM

Oh, I'm all fine for going with 32 spokes. That's actually what I was thinking. I just personally don't like the look of Deep-V's and don't think they'd look right on this bike. I'll look into the CXP33's. And as far as weight, I'm doing more of a resto-mod on this bike, so, I want to keep it stock looking all the while amping up it's performance (I know, rider skill has more to do with that).
Really, though, thanks for the input guys. I'll be making a standalone post for the Panasonic in a few weeks when I start collecting parts for it. You can keep up with it's progress from there, if any of you want to see.
GR

adrien 10-06-08 08:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jaxgtr (Post 7615002)
I don't think the front is nearly a big of deal as the rear. I think you could easily go with 28 on the front, maybe even 24. When I had my Deep V done, the other option for me was the CXP33. The builder told me either option was good.

+1.

Front deals with less weight, no torque issues and no dishing.

I have deep Vs on ultegra hubs...230 or so, often carry extra for the commute. I have 36 rears and 28 front. Needed to true rears after a crash (rough terrain followed by endo at about 17mph :twitchy:). Haven't touched the fronts other than a re-tensioning adjustment. About 4000 miles on the wheels right now.

Soemthing others have not mentioned: ensure a hand build, brass nipples, re-tension at 200-400 miles, by hand. Ask around -- wheel building is an art. Many have had luck on line (mine came from spin lite, and i remain in awe of their workmanship):love:


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