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-   -   Clyde-friendly saddles...suggestions? (http://www.bikeforums.net/clydesdales-athenas-200-lb-91-kg/476004-clyde-friendly-saddles-suggestions.html)

Fusion5 10-12-08 04:49 PM

Clyde-friendly saddles...suggestions?
 
Am 300lbs, 6'3, and am having no luck in the saddle department. I can't find anything I can tolerate for more than 6 miles or so, it's the only thing holding me back from really increasing my range.

So far, tried most of the Selle gel saddles, the RX, the ones with the cut out's, etc. Tried a Serfas. Even tried a few women's seats thinking maybe a bit wider would help. That was not correct. :)

The local shop has the B-17 saddle, but looking at it, it's rock hard and has rivets all around, it looks like a torture device :) I would imagine it has to break in, but good lord what painful miles those must be.

Thanks!!

10 Wheels 10-12-08 04:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fusion5 (Post 7651338)



I would imagine it has to break in, but good lord what painful miles those must be.

Thanks!!

I have now rode 8700 miles this year. My Butt is Now Tuff.
After reading all theses saddle posts, I have come to the conclusion that it is not the saddle , but Your Butt.
Does anyone else agree?

Servo888 10-12-08 05:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 10 Wheels (Post 7651355)
I have now rode 8700 miles this year. My Butt is Now Tuff.
After reading all theses saddle posts, I have come to the conclusion that it is not the saddle , but Your Butt.
Does anyone else agree?

I want to know too... Does your butt get better? I'm at ~600 miles so far this year (I don't do much riding *sigh*), and just finished a 32 mile ride today; I'm 216lbs, and my butt was SORE. I could have kept going for another 16 more miles if my butt wasn't in such bad shape.

I'm [---] close to buying new shorts, mine don't give any cushion it seems...

nobull60 10-12-08 05:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 10 Wheels (Post 7651355)
I have now rode 8700 miles this year. My Butt is Now Tuff.
After reading all theses saddle posts, I have come to the conclusion that it is not the saddle , but Your Butt.
Does anyone else agree?

Agree. I was feeling it also BUTT I stuck it out and now I don't even think about it and the pain is gone. :thumb: I just hit 2500 miles and feel fine. Stick it out and you'll be fine. I

late 10-12-08 05:41 PM

1) Are you riding a hybrid, a roadie or something in between.

2) It takes time to toughen up your butt even on a good saddle.

3) There are a few bikes that come with good saddles. You can also win the lottery, too.

4) The B67 is great if you are bolt upright or darn close to it. The B17 is good
for bikes with the bar at, or close to, the level of the saddle.

5) The width between your sit bones makes a difference. They need to be supported. Yours are going to be pretty wide. What I am getting at is that the
B17 was designed by guys that were about 5'9" a long time ago. If you are wide, find out how wide. Sit on a few layers of cardboard, and measure the distance between the dents. If a B17 does fit, it's one of the 2 or 3 best on the planet. If you get one, get the B17 Champion Special. Don't put anything on it. Adjustment can be a bit tricky, your LBS can prob help there.

6) I use a Selle Anatomica Titanico. It's hideously expensive. But it works.
I'd try some others first, and make sure you don't have other options.

badmother 10-12-08 05:44 PM

Your butt is going to be better, but if someting is wery wrong then you are still in troubbel.

Somebody mentioned a gel saddel, and I do not know any of the ones mentioned.

What I do know is that you do not want a soft saddel, you want a hard one.

Theory is you are going to sit on your sit bones, not on the softer areas in front of them and beteen them. If the saddel is soft your sitbones is sinking into the saddel and your weight is resting on the saddle on the softer parts of your body. That is going to hurt and you are newer going to get used to it.

I like hard brooks saddels, B17 is good. Depending on your riding style you could also look into a sprung Brooks. Being a clyde means alot of punishment on the bike, especially the rear wheel. A sprung saddle can help your rear wheel survive.

Most of the time I do not use padded trousers. Be patient. Ride short distances but often as a start, not long rides once a week.

Remember the area where you sit on a horses saddel is not soft, and you can ride for days but are going to be sore the first weeks.

I remember when I started riding bikes again. Bike from 1980, hard plastc saddel, sore bum. Had problems for many days after riding 8 km.

buddyp 10-12-08 05:49 PM

to a certain extent you just have to HTFU, on the other hand every body is different and some saddles are going to fit some people better than others.

to generalize a bit, the really cushy wide saddles targeted at beginners are not going to be comfortable on longer rides. The padding compresses and ends up putting pressure on parts that shouldn't have pressure on them. The Brooks saddles are really comfy when they are broken in. I'm told they dont take that long to break in but I've never had a new one myself, only used ones. The Brooks have a few downsides: they are really heavy (I guess thats not a big deal for a clyde) and they dont like to get wet

wayne pattee 10-12-08 05:59 PM

Quote:

I have come to the conclusion that it is not the saddle , but Your Butt.
Yep, you gotta get your butt in shape.
I bought an old brooks B17 at a garage sale last spring and it has turned out to be the best saddle I own. Done a few 30 to 35 mile rides with it this summer.
I've never had a new one and I hear there is some break in miles.

theetruscan 10-12-08 06:28 PM

Given that I just wrote a whole thread about how awesome the SA titanico is, I recommend it. To some extent there's getting your butt in shape, but there are great, good, mediocre, bad and ****tastic seats for all of us.
http://www.bikeforums.net/clydesdales-athenas-200-lb-91-kg/475996-shameless-plug-clyde-saddle.html

Neil_B 10-12-08 06:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 10 Wheels (Post 7651355)
I have now rode 8700 miles this year. My Butt is Now Tuff.
After reading all theses saddle posts, I have come to the conclusion that it is not the saddle , but Your Butt.
Does anyone else agree?

No, I don't. I rode 3000 miles on a saddle assuming the problem was my butt. (Yes, I am stubborn.) It wasn't.

cohophysh 10-12-08 08:07 PM

Bigger isn't necessarily better. I weigh 310 and use a 143mm saddle. You might want to go to the LBS and get measured....they have a measuring device, assos meter, assos scale...oh, I can't think of what it's called.

EasyEd 10-12-08 08:07 PM

I think it's about 1/3 butt, and 2/3 saddle. I bought a brooks flyer and I love it. Also, if you havn't had someone help you fit/adjust the bike to you, look into that before buying any more saddles. Finding just the right hight and angle was realy important for me, when it came to comfort.

StephenH 10-12-08 11:12 PM

I'm riding a cruiser with a big ol' cruiser saddle, and that works fine for me. It'd look silly on a road bike, but it's been done.

Tom Stormcrowe 10-12-08 11:37 PM

Actually, a big old cruiser saddle on a road bike is a terrible idea. You'll damage your Sciatic Nerve and restrict the circulation to your legs. The main point to a proper saddle is proper width to fit the lower portion of your pelvis, the Ischial protuberances, aka the sit bones. Too narrow and you support yourself on soft tissue, too wide is also bad.

Too much padding or gel and you get the padding flowing into soft tissue areas on longer rides.

My saddle width is 135 mm, by the way and either leather or my Allez has a board saddle, the Avatar from Specialized. All look like ass hatchets, but are very comfortable.

Quote:

Originally Posted by StephenH (Post 7653718)
I'm riding a cruiser with a big ol' cruiser saddle, and that works fine for me. It'd look silly on a road bike, but it's been done.


Raven87 10-12-08 11:47 PM

VERY comfortable - but hard to balance on the seat post OR to cinch it down.

:roflmao2::roflmao2::roflmao2:

http://www.saddleonline.com/images/0867t.jpg

imeridian 10-13-08 12:53 AM

I think I may be looking for a new saddle too. I mentioned it in the biggest loser thread, and since then I've spent a good bit of time working on adjustments. I don't think adjustments are going to do it for me, though, at this point. Since it's on-topic, I hope the OP doesn't mind me asking a couple of questions that may help both of us.

Is it a sign of a too narrow saddle if you can sort of rock side to side on it, like a weeble wobble? I mean to say, I don't feel very firmly planted, as if my sit bones are slipping off to either side.

Where are the sit bones supposed to land on the saddle? I know the answer to that question seems obvious, but should they be in the middle of the 'butt pad' area?

Mine are very near the edge, in so far as I can tell, and I think that may be the primary contributing factor to my tingling (which I suspect would be full-on numbness if I were to ride greater distance. If my sit bones aren't being adequately supported it stands to reason that I'm therefore putting significant pressure on the soft tissues.

Do you need to sit on the saddle 'just right' in order to be comfortable? I'm thinking that perhaps I'm sitting too far forward or backwards so that I'm at the widest part of the saddle. If it were just a tiny bit wider, perhaps I'd have much more of a range of comfortable positions. Though, according to the specs my saddle is already 143mm... *shrug*

TechKnowGN 10-13-08 09:47 AM

I bought a wider "comfort" seat from Schwinn at Target. Although I am dramatically more comfortable than on the stock seat from my 1993 Trek 800, I find after 6+ miles, I start having discomfort issues. I stand occasionally, or take the "top of the hill" breaks my quads so desperately need, but I still have crotchal discomfort. I am not a completely upright rider, but more up than down. What should I be looking at? I do not have budget for anything over say $50.

Current seat is this guy, I think:

http://cgi.ebay.com/Schwinn-Pillow-T...QQcmdZViewItem

Neil_B 10-13-08 09:56 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TechKnowGN (Post 7655515)
I bought a wider "comfort" seat from Schwinn at Target. Although I am dramatically more comfortable than on the stock seat from my 1993 Trek 800, I find after 6+ miles, I start having discomfort issues. I stand occasionally, or take the "top of the hill" breaks my quads so desperately need, but I still have crotchal discomfort. I am not a completely upright rider, but more up than down. What should I be looking at? I do not have budget for anything over say $50.

Current seat is this guy, I think:

http://cgi.ebay.com/Schwinn-Pillow-T...QQcmdZViewItem


My Serfas Gel Rx saddle chafed me, but that has to do with my sitting crooked on it, not the saddle itself. It's pretty good for a gel saddle, and you can get it for under 50 dollars online, I think.

Before you invest in a new saddle, try adjusting the old one. Is it level?

andrelam 10-13-08 10:55 AM

As the others have pointed out, there is an interaction between seat fit to your body, your fit on the bike, and the "hardness" of your body.

If you just can get comfortable make sure you are sitting properly on the bike for the kind of riding you do. Once you know that your are lined up well and the saddle is adjusted properly, then you may need to try a few different saddles. There is not fingle solution for that problem. Be sure to go to a store that lets you exchange the saddle. I had Bontrager saddle on my hybird and it was OK. When I 1st started riding daily (10 mile RT commute), I found that I was fine on the commute. When I did a straight run of 30 miles, I always started to hurt around the 10 mile mark and then was able to get past that feeling around the 20 mile mark. As I rode more and more this became less of a problem. This is part of the body getting used to riding. You muscles get stronger, etc. I also find that the lighter I ride, the more my posterior hurts. I guess the more you push with your legs, the more you push your body up as well therefore making the load a little less.

I bought a road bike this Spring. Even through by this the time I got the the new bike I could ride 30 miles not problem on the hybrid, my posterior became very painful, and my privates would go numb on the OEM Bontrager Race saddle on the bike. I switched to a Selle Royal Dardo and life immediately improved a lot. I don't think this is the best saddle in the world... but for the money it was good value and I can now ride a century.

During the early Summer my OEM Bontrager saddle on the hybrid started to get squeek. I replaced it with a Selle Royal ErgoGel. This saddle is very firm, but hugs in all the right places. There is a clearly improved reduction in pressure on critical area in the middle.

Gel in saddles can be very helpful, but the important part is that there isn't too much. You need to properly support the body. Too much gel (think cheap over-sized Schwinn saddle you'll find at Target) may look and feel nice and soft. The problem is that the weight gets spread around to too much of the soft tissues and will actually do more hard than good. You have to do a little trial and error to find what will work right for you.

Happy riding,
André

Wogster 10-13-08 12:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fusion5 (Post 7651338)
Am 300lbs, 6'3, and am having no luck in the saddle department. I can't find anything I can tolerate for more than 6 miles or so, it's the only thing holding me back from really increasing my range.

So far, tried most of the Selle gel saddles, the RX, the ones with the cut out's, etc. Tried a Serfas. Even tried a few women's seats thinking maybe a bit wider would help. That was not correct. :)

The local shop has the B-17 saddle, but looking at it, it's rock hard and has rivets all around, it looks like a torture device :) I would imagine it has to break in, but good lord what painful miles those must be.

Thanks!!

Amazingly enough, those rock hard saddles with the rivets, are actually better then soft saddles, there is a reason why after 100 years Brooks still makes the same basic design. . In your butt there are two bones sticking out, the sit bones, these should be centred on the widest part of the saddle, there may be no relation between the width of this framework, and the width of the "bumper" it's attached to.

People think they are uncomfortable, because people have butts used to thickly upholstered furniture, yes it does take time to get used to a harder saddle, not as long as you think though.....

TechKnowGN 10-13-08 12:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by The Historian (Post 7655572)
Before you invest in a new saddle, try adjusting the old one. Is it level?

It is level.

jesspal 10-13-08 12:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 10 Wheels (Post 7651355)
I have now rode 8700 miles this year. My Butt is Now Tuff.
After reading all theses saddle posts, I have come to the conclusion that it is not the saddle , but Your Butt.
Does anyone else agree?

definately agree

schnee 10-13-08 12:57 PM

It depends on how wide your hips are. I have a big frame, so I got the Specialized Avatar Gel in the widest size. Most other saddles felt like butt-hatchets in comparison. Don't let the name fool you, the saddle is still quite hard... it still took me a while to get used to it, but now I can do 4-5 hour rides and not get saddle sores.

funrover 10-13-08 01:04 PM

it's weird, but the thin, narrow saddles are a lot more comfortable for me than the padded, gel or wide ones!

TechKnowGN 10-13-08 01:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by schnee (Post 7656904)
It depends on how wide your hips are. I have a big frame, so I got the Specialized Avatar Gel in the widest size. Most other saddles felt like butt-hatchets in comparison. Don't let the name fool you, the saddle is still quite hard... it still took me a while to get used to it, but now I can do 4-5 hour rides and not get saddle sores.

And it took the pressure off your perineum/pudendal nerve?


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