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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

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Old 10-18-08, 03:39 PM   #1
TrekJapan
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Does anyone make, sell, and market a bicycle geared towards Clyde's?

I'm not a Clyde anymore but I was once a Clyde extraordinaire. I still lurk here because I like the discussions but it seems to me that some bike company could capture a market segment just by making a small line of beefier bikes.

Maybe I'm wrong but most people who buy bikes probably buy them to tone up and drop a few pounds, right?

As it is it seems like a Clyde has to get a bike and then upgrade wheels, seat, etc. I'm sure I'm missing something. I'm sure the companies want to project an image of fitness, blah, blah, blah but the reality is we're not all 145 lb. road racing machines.

Maybe I should make a specialty bike and sell it!

John
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Old 10-18-08, 05:44 PM   #2
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"Big guys need bigger, sturdier, well designed bikes. The Kona Hoss came from the Clydesdale class
and has been a popular choice for people who slam a bike around like a good bike should be."

http://www.konaworld.com/08_hoss_w.htm

http://www.konaworld.com/09_hoss_u.cfm
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Old 10-18-08, 08:28 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by TrekJapan View Post
I'm not a Clyde anymore but I was once a Clyde extraordinaire. I still lurk here because I like the discussions but it seems to me that some bike company could capture a market segment just by making a small line of beefier bikes.

Maybe I'm wrong but most people who buy bikes probably buy them to tone up and drop a few pounds, right?

As it is it seems like a Clyde has to get a bike and then upgrade wheels, seat, etc. I'm sure I'm missing something. I'm sure the companies want to project an image of fitness, blah, blah, blah but the reality is we're not all 145 lb. road racing machines.

Maybe I should make a specialty bike and sell it!

John
They do, make more friendly bikes, they call them touring bikes, heavier duty to carry a heavier load, designed to be more comfortable for long distances at reasonable speeds, often with heavy duty wheels. They also have lots of attachment points for accessories, so as you lose weight, you can carry extra stuff with you.
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Old 10-19-08, 04:19 AM   #4
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Worksman bikes are bombproof, but they're pretty beefy:

http://www.worksman.com/
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Old 10-19-08, 05:37 AM   #5
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Sort of...

Disc brake equipped 700c drop bar bikes - drop bar, discbrake, 700c, off the peg (stock saddles and wheels may need to be changed out)
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Old 10-19-08, 06:30 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by Wogsterca View Post
They do, make more friendly bikes, they call them touring bikes, heavier duty to carry a heavier load, designed to be more comfortable for long distances at reasonable speeds, often with heavy duty wheels. They also have lots of attachment points for accessories, so as you lose weight, you can carry extra stuff with you.
+1

A bike like the LHT is a terrific choice for lots of people, not just Clydes.
Traditional sport bikes (like the Surly Pacer or Gunnar Sport) are another thought.
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Old 10-19-08, 09:10 AM   #7
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They've been doing it for years. Makers like Merckx (sure I spelt it wrong) make hefty versions. But they are pricey as they are usually high end mfg'ers. I think DeRosa along with a few others.

As far as better wheels, I doubt they would equip them with something durable. That would take away from the bike aftermarket. Heck, even the bikes sold to skinny guys don't have good wheels. Bontrager for example. Lots of problems but the bike companies don't care cause they make mo down the line. Wheels only good enough for a testride and to get the bike out the door.

If the MFG'er cared that much, every bike would be sold with DA and great wheels. But they would lose money in the long run since not many would need more bikestuff!

Anothe problem is that Clydes aren't willing to spend money on good equipment. Most think $1500 is outrageous. Yes, some do but for the most part, no! I'm really shocked that when I mention buying a $50 rim online(Deep V), most freak cause they think it's big money for a rim.
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Old 10-19-08, 09:12 AM   #8
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I believe Klien built for heavier users.
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Old 10-19-08, 09:44 AM   #9
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aftermarket.
Anothe problem is that Clydes aren't willing to spend money on good equipment. .
That's true for some, but I think it's a misperception. Very few people jump into the
sport and spend 2 or 3K on a bike.

But after a year or three, it starts to make sense.

I like the CXP33 a little better than the Deep V, I think it's a little lighter and it's plenty tough. Currently I am using Ambrosio Excellence rims and I am liking them a lot. They make a fine wheel for a Clyde, and look good doing it.
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Old 10-22-08, 03:45 PM   #10
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I haven't used one of these (too pricey for my budget), but they make bikes for big people.

http://www.supersizedcycles.com/home

I weigh 325 pounds and I usually carry a backpack full of camera gear and books (another 25-50 pounds), and I ride a freebie Giant Yukon with few problems. My only issue has been I've bent a couple of back axles because I prefer the quick-release set-up so I can switch to studded tires in winter (we get a lot of ice and freezing rain where I live). Some of the terrain I ride on has a lot of bumps and potholes, so the back wheel/axle really take a pounding. The bolt-down version would be heavier duty than the quick-release tires, but I appreciate the convenience of being able to take off the tires to throw the bike in a car trunk.
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